Program designed to motivate, educate women in agriculture | TSLN.com

Program designed to motivate, educate women in agriculture

Amanda Nolz

Photo by Amanda NolzWomen attending the first class in the SASSY series on Oct. 20, 2009.

Women in agriculture are unsung heroes. When a woman vows to marry a farmer, she knows she is also marrying the operation, too, including the cattle, sheep, hogs, crops, hay and all of the work that goes with it. When marrying into farm life, she knows she will have a life full of blessings and a life full of trials. Yet, she takes it in stride, making it look easy as she balances things like off-the-farm work, home, family, food, bills, records, busy schedules, laundry, gardening, community service activities and the list goes on. However, despite how the farmwife manages to conquer the day-to-day tasks with ease, the one thing that is often forgotten is her.

That’s where Annie’s Project comes in. Annie’s Project is an educational program dedicated to strengthening women’s roles in the modern farm enterprise. This program is based on the life of a farm woman in Illinois, Annette (Kohlhagen) Fleck (1922-1997). Annie’s goal was to marry a farmer and she did. She spent her lifetime learning how to be an involved business partner with her farm husband. Of course, there were challenges including three generations living under one roof, low profitiability, changing farm enterprises and raising a family. Annie had to make many painful sacrifices that tested her conviction to be married to a farmer.

Despite the challenges, Annie was dedicated to keeping the farm business, her family and her marriage on track. Through it all, she kept records. Annie knew deadlines, reporting requirements, tax issues and risk management. Annie died a happy, wealthy woman, doing the things she loved in life. When Annie passed away, her daughter Ruth Fleck Hambleton recognized a need for a program that could help women like Annie, and so Annie’s Project was born. Currently, classes are being taught in 19 states. In South Dakota, the demand and popularity of Annie’s Project was so strong that soon the coordinators saw a need to expand the program, and SASSY (Sustaining Annie’s Across South Dakota for Years to Come) was created to fill that need.

Women in agriculture are unsung heroes. When a woman vows to marry a farmer, she knows she is also marrying the operation, too, including the cattle, sheep, hogs, crops, hay and all of the work that goes with it. When marrying into farm life, she knows she will have a life full of blessings and a life full of trials. Yet, she takes it in stride, making it look easy as she balances things like off-the-farm work, home, family, food, bills, records, busy schedules, laundry, gardening, community service activities and the list goes on. However, despite how the farmwife manages to conquer the day-to-day tasks with ease, the one thing that is often forgotten is her.

That’s where Annie’s Project comes in. Annie’s Project is an educational program dedicated to strengthening women’s roles in the modern farm enterprise. This program is based on the life of a farm woman in Illinois, Annette (Kohlhagen) Fleck (1922-1997). Annie’s goal was to marry a farmer and she did. She spent her lifetime learning how to be an involved business partner with her farm husband. Of course, there were challenges including three generations living under one roof, low profitiability, changing farm enterprises and raising a family. Annie had to make many painful sacrifices that tested her conviction to be married to a farmer.

Despite the challenges, Annie was dedicated to keeping the farm business, her family and her marriage on track. Through it all, she kept records. Annie knew deadlines, reporting requirements, tax issues and risk management. Annie died a happy, wealthy woman, doing the things she loved in life. When Annie passed away, her daughter Ruth Fleck Hambleton recognized a need for a program that could help women like Annie, and so Annie’s Project was born. Currently, classes are being taught in 19 states. In South Dakota, the demand and popularity of Annie’s Project was so strong that soon the coordinators saw a need to expand the program, and SASSY (Sustaining Annie’s Across South Dakota for Years to Come) was created to fill that need.

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Women in agriculture are unsung heroes. When a woman vows to marry a farmer, she knows she is also marrying the operation, too, including the cattle, sheep, hogs, crops, hay and all of the work that goes with it. When marrying into farm life, she knows she will have a life full of blessings and a life full of trials. Yet, she takes it in stride, making it look easy as she balances things like off-the-farm work, home, family, food, bills, records, busy schedules, laundry, gardening, community service activities and the list goes on. However, despite how the farmwife manages to conquer the day-to-day tasks with ease, the one thing that is often forgotten is her.

That’s where Annie’s Project comes in. Annie’s Project is an educational program dedicated to strengthening women’s roles in the modern farm enterprise. This program is based on the life of a farm woman in Illinois, Annette (Kohlhagen) Fleck (1922-1997). Annie’s goal was to marry a farmer and she did. She spent her lifetime learning how to be an involved business partner with her farm husband. Of course, there were challenges including three generations living under one roof, low profitiability, changing farm enterprises and raising a family. Annie had to make many painful sacrifices that tested her conviction to be married to a farmer.

Despite the challenges, Annie was dedicated to keeping the farm business, her family and her marriage on track. Through it all, she kept records. Annie knew deadlines, reporting requirements, tax issues and risk management. Annie died a happy, wealthy woman, doing the things she loved in life. When Annie passed away, her daughter Ruth Fleck Hambleton recognized a need for a program that could help women like Annie, and so Annie’s Project was born. Currently, classes are being taught in 19 states. In South Dakota, the demand and popularity of Annie’s Project was so strong that soon the coordinators saw a need to expand the program, and SASSY (Sustaining Annie’s Across South Dakota for Years to Come) was created to fill that need.