Prospect of snow bigger news than Wheeler or Thunberg | TSLN.com

Prospect of snow bigger news than Wheeler or Thunberg

Jerry Hagstrom

WILTON, N.D. – Visiting the farm where I grew up and relatives and friends is always a risky proposition in October.

This year, I was rewarded with one beautiful, sunny day and now the prospect of a snowstorm that may last for several days and bring up to a foot of snow.

Farmers are worried that they will never get to harvest crops that were planted late this year. To top off the late planting, there have been big rains during the harvest season. The up side: The countryside is green with good conditions for next spring’s planting.

The prospect of the first big winter storm is bigger news here this week than the visits of Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler and Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg.

The Bismarck Tribune and the broadcast media have covered both Wheeler’s and Thunberg’s visits, but the planning for up to a foot of snow in the next few days has been a bigger, continuous story.

Wheeler participated in a roundtable discussion on the Waters of the United States rule in Bismarck, gave interviews on the Renewable Fuel Standard and visited Fargo. (See following story.)

Thunberg visited the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe at Fort Yates, the site of protests against the Dakota Pipeline, where she urged young people in a group called Indigenized Youth to follow her lead and make their voices heard on environmental issues.

Thunberg and her father, who traveled to the United States by boat rather than by air, are traveling around North America in an electric car loaned by actor and former California Republican Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. But in a sign of the gap between urban and rural America, they had to leave the electric car in Rapid City, S.D., due to the lack of charging stations in the Dakotas, and hitch a ride to Standing Rock with journalists, The Bismarck Tribune reported. After they return to South Dakota, the pair will visit Colorado and the tar sands region of Alberta, Canada.

–The Hagstrom Report