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Pursuing a farming, ranching career

Amanda Nolz
Photo by Amanda NolzMatt Miller is the fifth generation of Millers to live and work on his family's operation near Howard, SD. Expansion has made it possible for him to return.

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Like many ranch kids, Matt Miller of Howard, SD got his start in the cattle business through a 4-H project. His parents, Dave and Marcia, gave him a show heifer each summer, and in turn, they would retain half of the calf crop to pay for feed costs, yardage and medicines. Not a bad way to get into the business, and it was all the fuel Miller needed to feed his growing passion for the beef cattle industry.

Today, the Miller family maintains 2,600 acres of pasture, 1,500 acres of corn and beans, 450 spring-calving cows and 100 more to calve in the fall. They retain 150-200 replacement heifers each year, synchronizing them for artificial insemination. They are also in partnership with Wulf Limousin, Morris, MN, placing 130 Wulf embryos in their cows each summer, with the calves contracted to be sold back to Wulfs two weeks after weaning. They breed their cows to Angus semen, and use Charolais bulls as clean up.

Like many ranch kids, Matt Miller of Howard, SD got his start in the cattle business through a 4-H project. His parents, Dave and Marcia, gave him a show heifer each summer, and in turn, they would retain half of the calf crop to pay for feed costs, yardage and medicines. Not a bad way to get into the business, and it was all the fuel Miller needed to feed his growing passion for the beef cattle industry.

Today, the Miller family maintains 2,600 acres of pasture, 1,500 acres of corn and beans, 450 spring-calving cows and 100 more to calve in the fall. They retain 150-200 replacement heifers each year, synchronizing them for artificial insemination. They are also in partnership with Wulf Limousin, Morris, MN, placing 130 Wulf embryos in their cows each summer, with the calves contracted to be sold back to Wulfs two weeks after weaning. They breed their cows to Angus semen, and use Charolais bulls as clean up.

Like many ranch kids, Matt Miller of Howard, SD got his start in the cattle business through a 4-H project. His parents, Dave and Marcia, gave him a show heifer each summer, and in turn, they would retain half of the calf crop to pay for feed costs, yardage and medicines. Not a bad way to get into the business, and it was all the fuel Miller needed to feed his growing passion for the beef cattle industry.

Today, the Miller family maintains 2,600 acres of pasture, 1,500 acres of corn and beans, 450 spring-calving cows and 100 more to calve in the fall. They retain 150-200 replacement heifers each year, synchronizing them for artificial insemination. They are also in partnership with Wulf Limousin, Morris, MN, placing 130 Wulf embryos in their cows each summer, with the calves contracted to be sold back to Wulfs two weeks after weaning. They breed their cows to Angus semen, and use Charolais bulls as clean up.


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