Range Report | TSLN.com

Range Report

Warmer weather continues to facilitate the development of row crops and small grains in South Dakota. However, dry conditions in some parts of the state are causing early indications of moisture stress in some crops and hay. There were 6.6 days suitable for fieldwork in the past week. Farm activities focused on the cutting of hay, application of fertilizer and chemicals, general care of livestock and preparing machinery for the harvest of small grains.

This report is based on information from county extension educators, Farm Service Agency county directors, and other reporters across the states.

Temperatures went into the 90s over nearly the whole state last week, according to the State Climate Office of South Dakota. Average temperatures for the week were still were below average over much of the western part of the state, by as much as 4°F. However, average temperatures stayed a couple degrees above average over much of the eastern part of the state. But GDD accumulations since the beginning of the growing season are still from 25 to 300 GDDs behind average.

Storms were generally confined to western parts of the state during the week, with over 1 inch rainfalls in Milesville and in the Black Hills. Generally, accumulations were much less than an inch at stations. This is leading to problems in the eastern part of the state where accumulations over the last 30 days are less than 50 percent of average. Large hail, greater than an inch in diameter, was reported during storms in the western and northern parts of the state on Wednesday and Thursday.

Lack of recent precipitation in some areas of the state has caused topsoil moisture ratings in the adequate and surplus categories to drop 17 percentage points from last week, this week rated at 65 percent. Subsoil moisture is also drying out, this week rated at 80 percent adequate to surplus. The U.S. Drought Monitor has rated 18.1 percent of the state as abnormally dry, with the rating covering areas in the southwest, northwest and northeast corners of the state.

The first cutting of alfalfa advanced to 90 percent complete and second cutting is also progressing well, this week estimated at 19 percent complete. Range and pasture conditions declined slightly, down four percentage points in the good to excellent categories, now estimated at 82 percent. Feed supplies and stock water supplies remain strong, rated at 94 percent and 92 percent adequate to surplus.

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With no major reports of any livestock problems, cattle and sheep conditions remain high at 91 percent and 94 percent good to excellent, respectively.

Warmer weather continues to facilitate the development of row crops and small grains in South Dakota. However, dry conditions in some parts of the state are causing early indications of moisture stress in some crops and hay. There were 6.6 days suitable for fieldwork in the past week. Farm activities focused on the cutting of hay, application of fertilizer and chemicals, general care of livestock and preparing machinery for the harvest of small grains.

This report is based on information from county extension educators, Farm Service Agency county directors, and other reporters across the states.

Temperatures went into the 90s over nearly the whole state last week, according to the State Climate Office of South Dakota. Average temperatures for the week were still were below average over much of the western part of the state, by as much as 4°F. However, average temperatures stayed a couple degrees above average over much of the eastern part of the state. But GDD accumulations since the beginning of the growing season are still from 25 to 300 GDDs behind average.

Storms were generally confined to western parts of the state during the week, with over 1 inch rainfalls in Milesville and in the Black Hills. Generally, accumulations were much less than an inch at stations. This is leading to problems in the eastern part of the state where accumulations over the last 30 days are less than 50 percent of average. Large hail, greater than an inch in diameter, was reported during storms in the western and northern parts of the state on Wednesday and Thursday.

Lack of recent precipitation in some areas of the state has caused topsoil moisture ratings in the adequate and surplus categories to drop 17 percentage points from last week, this week rated at 65 percent. Subsoil moisture is also drying out, this week rated at 80 percent adequate to surplus. The U.S. Drought Monitor has rated 18.1 percent of the state as abnormally dry, with the rating covering areas in the southwest, northwest and northeast corners of the state.

The first cutting of alfalfa advanced to 90 percent complete and second cutting is also progressing well, this week estimated at 19 percent complete. Range and pasture conditions declined slightly, down four percentage points in the good to excellent categories, now estimated at 82 percent. Feed supplies and stock water supplies remain strong, rated at 94 percent and 92 percent adequate to surplus.

With no major reports of any livestock problems, cattle and sheep conditions remain high at 91 percent and 94 percent good to excellent, respectively.

Warmer weather continues to facilitate the development of row crops and small grains in South Dakota. However, dry conditions in some parts of the state are causing early indications of moisture stress in some crops and hay. There were 6.6 days suitable for fieldwork in the past week. Farm activities focused on the cutting of hay, application of fertilizer and chemicals, general care of livestock and preparing machinery for the harvest of small grains.

This report is based on information from county extension educators, Farm Service Agency county directors, and other reporters across the states.

Temperatures went into the 90s over nearly the whole state last week, according to the State Climate Office of South Dakota. Average temperatures for the week were still were below average over much of the western part of the state, by as much as 4°F. However, average temperatures stayed a couple degrees above average over much of the eastern part of the state. But GDD accumulations since the beginning of the growing season are still from 25 to 300 GDDs behind average.

Storms were generally confined to western parts of the state during the week, with over 1 inch rainfalls in Milesville and in the Black Hills. Generally, accumulations were much less than an inch at stations. This is leading to problems in the eastern part of the state where accumulations over the last 30 days are less than 50 percent of average. Large hail, greater than an inch in diameter, was reported during storms in the western and northern parts of the state on Wednesday and Thursday.

Lack of recent precipitation in some areas of the state has caused topsoil moisture ratings in the adequate and surplus categories to drop 17 percentage points from last week, this week rated at 65 percent. Subsoil moisture is also drying out, this week rated at 80 percent adequate to surplus. The U.S. Drought Monitor has rated 18.1 percent of the state as abnormally dry, with the rating covering areas in the southwest, northwest and northeast corners of the state.

The first cutting of alfalfa advanced to 90 percent complete and second cutting is also progressing well, this week estimated at 19 percent complete. Range and pasture conditions declined slightly, down four percentage points in the good to excellent categories, now estimated at 82 percent. Feed supplies and stock water supplies remain strong, rated at 94 percent and 92 percent adequate to surplus.

With no major reports of any livestock problems, cattle and sheep conditions remain high at 91 percent and 94 percent good to excellent, respectively.

Warmer weather continues to facilitate the development of row crops and small grains in South Dakota. However, dry conditions in some parts of the state are causing early indications of moisture stress in some crops and hay. There were 6.6 days suitable for fieldwork in the past week. Farm activities focused on the cutting of hay, application of fertilizer and chemicals, general care of livestock and preparing machinery for the harvest of small grains.

This report is based on information from county extension educators, Farm Service Agency county directors, and other reporters across the states.

Temperatures went into the 90s over nearly the whole state last week, according to the State Climate Office of South Dakota. Average temperatures for the week were still were below average over much of the western part of the state, by as much as 4°F. However, average temperatures stayed a couple degrees above average over much of the eastern part of the state. But GDD accumulations since the beginning of the growing season are still from 25 to 300 GDDs behind average.

Storms were generally confined to western parts of the state during the week, with over 1 inch rainfalls in Milesville and in the Black Hills. Generally, accumulations were much less than an inch at stations. This is leading to problems in the eastern part of the state where accumulations over the last 30 days are less than 50 percent of average. Large hail, greater than an inch in diameter, was reported during storms in the western and northern parts of the state on Wednesday and Thursday.

Lack of recent precipitation in some areas of the state has caused topsoil moisture ratings in the adequate and surplus categories to drop 17 percentage points from last week, this week rated at 65 percent. Subsoil moisture is also drying out, this week rated at 80 percent adequate to surplus. The U.S. Drought Monitor has rated 18.1 percent of the state as abnormally dry, with the rating covering areas in the southwest, northwest and northeast corners of the state.

The first cutting of alfalfa advanced to 90 percent complete and second cutting is also progressing well, this week estimated at 19 percent complete. Range and pasture conditions declined slightly, down four percentage points in the good to excellent categories, now estimated at 82 percent. Feed supplies and stock water supplies remain strong, rated at 94 percent and 92 percent adequate to surplus.

With no major reports of any livestock problems, cattle and sheep conditions remain high at 91 percent and 94 percent good to excellent, respectively.

Warmer weather continues to facilitate the development of row crops and small grains in South Dakota. However, dry conditions in some parts of the state are causing early indications of moisture stress in some crops and hay. There were 6.6 days suitable for fieldwork in the past week. Farm activities focused on the cutting of hay, application of fertilizer and chemicals, general care of livestock and preparing machinery for the harvest of small grains.

This report is based on information from county extension educators, Farm Service Agency county directors, and other reporters across the states.

Temperatures went into the 90s over nearly the whole state last week, according to the State Climate Office of South Dakota. Average temperatures for the week were still were below average over much of the western part of the state, by as much as 4°F. However, average temperatures stayed a couple degrees above average over much of the eastern part of the state. But GDD accumulations since the beginning of the growing season are still from 25 to 300 GDDs behind average.

Storms were generally confined to western parts of the state during the week, with over 1 inch rainfalls in Milesville and in the Black Hills. Generally, accumulations were much less than an inch at stations. This is leading to problems in the eastern part of the state where accumulations over the last 30 days are less than 50 percent of average. Large hail, greater than an inch in diameter, was reported during storms in the western and northern parts of the state on Wednesday and Thursday.

Lack of recent precipitation in some areas of the state has caused topsoil moisture ratings in the adequate and surplus categories to drop 17 percentage points from last week, this week rated at 65 percent. Subsoil moisture is also drying out, this week rated at 80 percent adequate to surplus. The U.S. Drought Monitor has rated 18.1 percent of the state as abnormally dry, with the rating covering areas in the southwest, northwest and northeast corners of the state.

The first cutting of alfalfa advanced to 90 percent complete and second cutting is also progressing well, this week estimated at 19 percent complete. Range and pasture conditions declined slightly, down four percentage points in the good to excellent categories, now estimated at 82 percent. Feed supplies and stock water supplies remain strong, rated at 94 percent and 92 percent adequate to surplus.

With no major reports of any livestock problems, cattle and sheep conditions remain high at 91 percent and 94 percent good to excellent, respectively.