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Rocky Mountain Breeders Association ranch horse clinic held April 30

Bill Brewster
Photo by Bill BrewsterSharon Icenoggle's horse pays close attention while pulling a tire in the trail section during the Rocky Mountain Breeders Association day-long clinic held April 30 in Townsend, MT.

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A successful clinic that covered the basic components of ranch horse competition was the latest activity sponsored by the Rocky Mountain Breeders Association (RMBA).

The day-long clinic, held April 30, with six experienced trainers serving as instructors, was held at the Broadwater Co. Fairgrounds in Townsend, MT, with 20 participants. The clinic marked the start of a busy summer season for the organization.

Planned by RMBA show committee chairman Shad Lemke of Wilsall, the event featured rotating stations where participants could spend uninterrupted time with each of the instructors.

Farrel Wheeler of Dillon, conducted the cow-work segment during the day with assistance from Lemke. The dry work section was taught by Patrick Severance of Belgrade, and the roping work was conducted by J.R. Winter of Livingston, with assistance from Dewey Zupan of Wilsall. Josey Sutton of Lincoln, handled the trail work. One of Sutton’s projects each year is to start colts for the Galt Ranch located near White Sulphur Springs.

“The whole goal for the ranch horse competitions is geared to helping people and their horses so they learn and better their horsemanship and their horses,” Lemke said. “I always use the shows, for example, to better both my horse and myself.”

Lemke said he picked clinicians that were really good in their specific fields, besides being good at helping people.

“A lot of really good ideas were exchanged during the day,” he said, “and people were really having fun while they learned.”

Lemke, who works for a ranch in Park County (MT), said the ranch horse show schedule is set up similarly, so competitors can have a good time while showing.

One of the highlights of the show is the class for two years olds at each show, where the progression can be followed throughout the show season.

“I like it because everybody is there to learn and have a good time,” Lemke added. “We don’t really have a strict time limit with each event during the shows.”

A successful clinic that covered the basic components of ranch horse competition was the latest activity sponsored by the Rocky Mountain Breeders Association (RMBA).

The day-long clinic, held April 30, with six experienced trainers serving as instructors, was held at the Broadwater Co. Fairgrounds in Townsend, MT, with 20 participants. The clinic marked the start of a busy summer season for the organization.

Planned by RMBA show committee chairman Shad Lemke of Wilsall, the event featured rotating stations where participants could spend uninterrupted time with each of the instructors.

Farrel Wheeler of Dillon, conducted the cow-work segment during the day with assistance from Lemke. The dry work section was taught by Patrick Severance of Belgrade, and the roping work was conducted by J.R. Winter of Livingston, with assistance from Dewey Zupan of Wilsall. Josey Sutton of Lincoln, handled the trail work. One of Sutton’s projects each year is to start colts for the Galt Ranch located near White Sulphur Springs.

“The whole goal for the ranch horse competitions is geared to helping people and their horses so they learn and better their horsemanship and their horses,” Lemke said. “I always use the shows, for example, to better both my horse and myself.”

Lemke said he picked clinicians that were really good in their specific fields, besides being good at helping people.

“A lot of really good ideas were exchanged during the day,” he said, “and people were really having fun while they learned.”

Lemke, who works for a ranch in Park County (MT), said the ranch horse show schedule is set up similarly, so competitors can have a good time while showing.

One of the highlights of the show is the class for two years olds at each show, where the progression can be followed throughout the show season.

“I like it because everybody is there to learn and have a good time,” Lemke added. “We don’t really have a strict time limit with each event during the shows.”

A successful clinic that covered the basic components of ranch horse competition was the latest activity sponsored by the Rocky Mountain Breeders Association (RMBA).

The day-long clinic, held April 30, with six experienced trainers serving as instructors, was held at the Broadwater Co. Fairgrounds in Townsend, MT, with 20 participants. The clinic marked the start of a busy summer season for the organization.

Planned by RMBA show committee chairman Shad Lemke of Wilsall, the event featured rotating stations where participants could spend uninterrupted time with each of the instructors.

Farrel Wheeler of Dillon, conducted the cow-work segment during the day with assistance from Lemke. The dry work section was taught by Patrick Severance of Belgrade, and the roping work was conducted by J.R. Winter of Livingston, with assistance from Dewey Zupan of Wilsall. Josey Sutton of Lincoln, handled the trail work. One of Sutton’s projects each year is to start colts for the Galt Ranch located near White Sulphur Springs.

“The whole goal for the ranch horse competitions is geared to helping people and their horses so they learn and better their horsemanship and their horses,” Lemke said. “I always use the shows, for example, to better both my horse and myself.”

Lemke said he picked clinicians that were really good in their specific fields, besides being good at helping people.

“A lot of really good ideas were exchanged during the day,” he said, “and people were really having fun while they learned.”

Lemke, who works for a ranch in Park County (MT), said the ranch horse show schedule is set up similarly, so competitors can have a good time while showing.

One of the highlights of the show is the class for two years olds at each show, where the progression can be followed throughout the show season.

“I like it because everybody is there to learn and have a good time,” Lemke added. “We don’t really have a strict time limit with each event during the shows.”

A successful clinic that covered the basic components of ranch horse competition was the latest activity sponsored by the Rocky Mountain Breeders Association (RMBA).

The day-long clinic, held April 30, with six experienced trainers serving as instructors, was held at the Broadwater Co. Fairgrounds in Townsend, MT, with 20 participants. The clinic marked the start of a busy summer season for the organization.

Planned by RMBA show committee chairman Shad Lemke of Wilsall, the event featured rotating stations where participants could spend uninterrupted time with each of the instructors.

Farrel Wheeler of Dillon, conducted the cow-work segment during the day with assistance from Lemke. The dry work section was taught by Patrick Severance of Belgrade, and the roping work was conducted by J.R. Winter of Livingston, with assistance from Dewey Zupan of Wilsall. Josey Sutton of Lincoln, handled the trail work. One of Sutton’s projects each year is to start colts for the Galt Ranch located near White Sulphur Springs.

“The whole goal for the ranch horse competitions is geared to helping people and their horses so they learn and better their horsemanship and their horses,” Lemke said. “I always use the shows, for example, to better both my horse and myself.”

Lemke said he picked clinicians that were really good in their specific fields, besides being good at helping people.

“A lot of really good ideas were exchanged during the day,” he said, “and people were really having fun while they learned.”

Lemke, who works for a ranch in Park County (MT), said the ranch horse show schedule is set up similarly, so competitors can have a good time while showing.

One of the highlights of the show is the class for two years olds at each show, where the progression can be followed throughout the show season.

“I like it because everybody is there to learn and have a good time,” Lemke added. “We don’t really have a strict time limit with each event during the shows.”

A successful clinic that covered the basic components of ranch horse competition was the latest activity sponsored by the Rocky Mountain Breeders Association (RMBA).

The day-long clinic, held April 30, with six experienced trainers serving as instructors, was held at the Broadwater Co. Fairgrounds in Townsend, MT, with 20 participants. The clinic marked the start of a busy summer season for the organization.

Planned by RMBA show committee chairman Shad Lemke of Wilsall, the event featured rotating stations where participants could spend uninterrupted time with each of the instructors.

Farrel Wheeler of Dillon, conducted the cow-work segment during the day with assistance from Lemke. The dry work section was taught by Patrick Severance of Belgrade, and the roping work was conducted by J.R. Winter of Livingston, with assistance from Dewey Zupan of Wilsall. Josey Sutton of Lincoln, handled the trail work. One of Sutton’s projects each year is to start colts for the Galt Ranch located near White Sulphur Springs.

“The whole goal for the ranch horse competitions is geared to helping people and their horses so they learn and better their horsemanship and their horses,” Lemke said. “I always use the shows, for example, to better both my horse and myself.”

Lemke said he picked clinicians that were really good in their specific fields, besides being good at helping people.

“A lot of really good ideas were exchanged during the day,” he said, “and people were really having fun while they learned.”

Lemke, who works for a ranch in Park County (MT), said the ranch horse show schedule is set up similarly, so competitors can have a good time while showing.

One of the highlights of the show is the class for two years olds at each show, where the progression can be followed throughout the show season.

“I like it because everybody is there to learn and have a good time,” Lemke added. “We don’t really have a strict time limit with each event during the shows.”


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