Rocky Mountain College to host 20th anniversary Black Tie Blue Jeans benefit | TSLN.com

Rocky Mountain College to host 20th anniversary Black Tie Blue Jeans benefit

BILLINGS, MT – Rocky Mountain College (RMC) President Michael Mace appreciates how much the college owes to the Western tradition of self-reliance and can-do spirit.

On the 20th anniversary of the College’s Black Tie Blue Jeans (BTBJ) scholarship benefit, President Mace is honoring the heritage of the early BTBJ events by renewing the College’s historic use of its own brand. With Montana Livestock Department Executive Director Christian Mackay, whose grandfather served on the RMC Board in its formative years, spearheading the effort, the college hopes to enlist Montana ranchers in donating the proceeds from the sale of one calf from their herd to BTBJ. Co-chairing the RMC Donate-a-Calf Program is longtime Montana rancher and owner of Intermountain Equestrian Center, Barb Skelton.

“One graduate told me that a long time ago, his dad literally loaded up three calves and him into the pickup truck, drove to Rocky when it was Billings Polytechnic, and that’s how his dad paid his tuition,” Mace explained. “Twenty years ago, an offshoot of that were cattle ranchers agreeing to each brand one calf with the official RMC brand, which were then auctioned off at the event.”

Over the years, the logistics of branding calves and rounding them up was too cumbersome and the program faded.

What has not faded is Rocky’s connection to its rural roots. More than 60 percent of RMC’s students are Montana natives, and a good many of them have roots in ranching and farming, just like Christian Mackay and Barb Skelton.

“Rocky appreciates the commitment many in the ag industry have made to Rocky,” Mace said. “The help this program offers to our students in the form of scholarships often determines whether they can finish a college education. The young men and women who graduate from Rocky make enormous contributions in their careers and communities.”

Recommended Stories For You

Mackay said the program will indicate that the ag community is willing to once again show its support and commitment to higher education.

“In the early days of the College, students rolled up their sleeves to literally build the places where they would attend class,” says Mackay. “They quarried the rock and built many of the historic buildings still serving today’s students. They milled grain and sold the cereal door to door. They raised a dairy herd.”

BILLINGS, MT – Rocky Mountain College (RMC) President Michael Mace appreciates how much the college owes to the Western tradition of self-reliance and can-do spirit.

On the 20th anniversary of the College’s Black Tie Blue Jeans (BTBJ) scholarship benefit, President Mace is honoring the heritage of the early BTBJ events by renewing the College’s historic use of its own brand. With Montana Livestock Department Executive Director Christian Mackay, whose grandfather served on the RMC Board in its formative years, spearheading the effort, the college hopes to enlist Montana ranchers in donating the proceeds from the sale of one calf from their herd to BTBJ. Co-chairing the RMC Donate-a-Calf Program is longtime Montana rancher and owner of Intermountain Equestrian Center, Barb Skelton.

“One graduate told me that a long time ago, his dad literally loaded up three calves and him into the pickup truck, drove to Rocky when it was Billings Polytechnic, and that’s how his dad paid his tuition,” Mace explained. “Twenty years ago, an offshoot of that were cattle ranchers agreeing to each brand one calf with the official RMC brand, which were then auctioned off at the event.”

Over the years, the logistics of branding calves and rounding them up was too cumbersome and the program faded.

What has not faded is Rocky’s connection to its rural roots. More than 60 percent of RMC’s students are Montana natives, and a good many of them have roots in ranching and farming, just like Christian Mackay and Barb Skelton.

“Rocky appreciates the commitment many in the ag industry have made to Rocky,” Mace said. “The help this program offers to our students in the form of scholarships often determines whether they can finish a college education. The young men and women who graduate from Rocky make enormous contributions in their careers and communities.”

Mackay said the program will indicate that the ag community is willing to once again show its support and commitment to higher education.

“In the early days of the College, students rolled up their sleeves to literally build the places where they would attend class,” says Mackay. “They quarried the rock and built many of the historic buildings still serving today’s students. They milled grain and sold the cereal door to door. They raised a dairy herd.”

BILLINGS, MT – Rocky Mountain College (RMC) President Michael Mace appreciates how much the college owes to the Western tradition of self-reliance and can-do spirit.

On the 20th anniversary of the College’s Black Tie Blue Jeans (BTBJ) scholarship benefit, President Mace is honoring the heritage of the early BTBJ events by renewing the College’s historic use of its own brand. With Montana Livestock Department Executive Director Christian Mackay, whose grandfather served on the RMC Board in its formative years, spearheading the effort, the college hopes to enlist Montana ranchers in donating the proceeds from the sale of one calf from their herd to BTBJ. Co-chairing the RMC Donate-a-Calf Program is longtime Montana rancher and owner of Intermountain Equestrian Center, Barb Skelton.

“One graduate told me that a long time ago, his dad literally loaded up three calves and him into the pickup truck, drove to Rocky when it was Billings Polytechnic, and that’s how his dad paid his tuition,” Mace explained. “Twenty years ago, an offshoot of that were cattle ranchers agreeing to each brand one calf with the official RMC brand, which were then auctioned off at the event.”

Over the years, the logistics of branding calves and rounding them up was too cumbersome and the program faded.

What has not faded is Rocky’s connection to its rural roots. More than 60 percent of RMC’s students are Montana natives, and a good many of them have roots in ranching and farming, just like Christian Mackay and Barb Skelton.

“Rocky appreciates the commitment many in the ag industry have made to Rocky,” Mace said. “The help this program offers to our students in the form of scholarships often determines whether they can finish a college education. The young men and women who graduate from Rocky make enormous contributions in their careers and communities.”

Mackay said the program will indicate that the ag community is willing to once again show its support and commitment to higher education.

“In the early days of the College, students rolled up their sleeves to literally build the places where they would attend class,” says Mackay. “They quarried the rock and built many of the historic buildings still serving today’s students. They milled grain and sold the cereal door to door. They raised a dairy herd.”