Rodeo center opens in Fort Pierre | TSLN.com

Rodeo center opens in Fort Pierre

The broad beautiful, deceptively lazy-looking Missouri River has witnessed more history in progress than most any other part of America. Transporting a rare breed of wild, adventuresome, freedom-seeking humanity, it developed into the big artery nurturing the heart of the infant West… symbol of the pioneer spirit that made men and women willing to board some type of watercraft at St. Louis and brave whatever unknown and unexpected danger each bend and turn might bring.

How fitting that a modern-day tribute to the unbridled spirit of the cowboy stands today on a shale bluff overlooking a breathtaking vista of that very river! And what a tribute it is – the Casey Tibbs South Dakota Rodeo Center & Mattie Goff-Newcombe Conference Center; a museum devoted exclusively to the cowboy sports spawned by the 1880’s cattle industry across the West, and the continuing influence that culture exerts on South Dakota.

Looming above its hometown of Fort Pierre, the unassuming exterior of the Center is completely deceptive. Only the brilliant purple rodeo silhouettes – depicting Mattie performing the Liberty stand and Casey spurring a big saddle bronc in his inimitable style – hint at the colorful explosion of history and culture to be found inside.

Visitors are greeted and welcomed by breathtaking, life sized Tony Chytka bronzes of Casey getting down in the chute on a bronc and Mattie trick riding on her favorite horse – fitting centerpieces for the ground floor rotunda. The theater/viewing room showcasing the history of South Dakota rodeo stirs visitors’ adrenaline and sends chills down their spines as they experience a crash course in the sport. Moving on from there they discover exhibits highlighting rodeo producers, announcers, clowns, specialty acts and queens; and data on 4-H, Little Britches, High School, Intercollegiate, Indian, Pro and Amateur rodeo associations. Big screens feature video productions by Steve Hall and Dave Hobson profiling the lives and accomplishments of South Dakota’s 18 World Champions. Younger guests flock to interactive Bronc Room and Dress-Up areas, where they’re free to make hands-on connections to any facets of rodeo that inspire them, including a simulated 8-second roughstock ride.

A dedicated Casey Tibbs segment houses the largest collection of historic memorabilia highlighting the many-times World Champion cowboy’s colorful childhood, rugged youth, meteoric rodeo career and lasting contributions to the sport.

Attractive and historically-accurate interpretative signs front the many sparkling enclosed cases scattered throughout both floors of the Center, each displaying priceless rodeo or pioneer memorabilia. Glass-topped display stands, in wagon wheel motif, contain championship buckles, photos and awards earned by the many honorees. Realistic murals morph into touchable reality as you come face to face with the homemade wooden horse trailer in which Mattie Goff transported her trick riding horse.

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Amplifying the museum concept, the state-of-the-art Mattie Goff Newcombe Conference Center offers every amenity for special events, meetings, conventions and receptions. Available for day and evening events, the Center can accommodate over 400 in stand-up receptions; the Theatre can seat 275-300. The full catering kitchen is equipped with dishes, flatware and serving pieces, and the dining area will easily seat 200-plus in rounds. Stereo sound permeates the meeting space, which is equipped with ample power floor outlets to accommodate laptop use and VCR/ DVD presentations. Polycom conference phone, Fax and copier business services, and both handheld and lavaliere wireless microphones are available, while parking is almost unlimited.

This amazing venue, “where legends live on,” was officially opened last weekend, Aug. 14-16, attracting visitors from across the nation, as far away as Arkansas, Texas, and Indiana. Overflow crowds for the three-day blowout enjoyed a large vendor’s showcase, an ongoing program of varied Western entertainment, cowboy breakfast, beef & beans chuckwagon cookout, honoree/sponsor/donor reception, “hog wild” barbecue, “Born to Buck” Champion’s Dinner; bull riding competition, street dance, and the arrival and parade of the Fort Bennett to Fort Pierre “Casey Tibbs Memorial Ride” Wagon Train. Special traveling art exhibits by Mick Harrison, Mavis Madison, John Lopez, Kat Thompson and Tony Chytka beautified the museum and grounds for the big weekend.

All this is fruition of the dreams and vision of Mattie Goff Newcombe and Casey Tibbs, supported and brought to reality by innumerable generous people who donated money, time, talent and artifacts to enhance the collection. The Casey Tibbs Foundation (a 501©3 not-for-profit institution with the purpose and mission to preserve the heritage of rodeo and the western culture of South Dakota while promoting athletic and educational activities and opportunities for both the young people and adult citizens of South Dakota) was begun in 1989. It started as rodeo supporters, friends and family members visited with Casey during his last year of life, catching his vision for a facility that would pay tribute not only to his personal rodeo record but also to all South Dakota rodeo legends. A Foundation Tribute Dinner has been held annually since 1990, where deserving South Dakotan’s have been honored in five categories each year – Ranch Cowboy Family, Past Rodeo Great, Rodeo Promoter, Present Rodeo Cowgirl Great and Present Rodeo Cowboy Great. Two walls in the second story of the Center are covered with photos and information about those South Dakota heroes.

The Foundation’s hardworking Board of Directors currently includes President Dayle Tibbs Angyal; Vice President Pat Duffy; Secretary Jessie Tibbs Keckler; and Treasurer Bernie Duffy. Other board members include Bryan Hanson, Dick Herman, Gary Johnson, Betty Lou Kost, Diana Melvin, Johnny Smith, and Larry Tibbs.

South Dakota has produced 18 World Champion cowboys and cowgirls since records have been kept. They include 1927 Trick Riding Champion Mattie Goff Newcombe; 1929 All Around Cowboy and 1929 and ’31 Saddle Bronc Champ Earl Thode; 1946 Bull Riding Champion Pee Wee Morris; Casey Tibbs, Saddle Bronc Champion of 1949, 1951-1954 and 1959 as well as 1951 Bareback Champion and All Around Cowboy of 1951 and 1955. Then there’s Jack Buschbom, 1949, 1959 and 1960 Bareback Champion; Alvin Nelson, 1957 Saddle Bronc Champ; Paul Tierney, 1970 Tie-Down Roping Champion and 1980 All Around Cowboy; Clint Johnson who was Saddle Bronc Champion in 1980, 1987, 1988 and 1989; Ote Berry, Steer Wrestling Champ in 1985, 1990, ’91 and ’95; Bareback Champion for 1988, 1989, 1994 and 1995 Marvin Garrett; and Robert Etbauer, Saddle Bronc Champion in 1990 and 1991. In Tie Down Roping Troy Pruitt is honored for his 1990 Championship; Billy Etbauer held Saddle Bronc titles in 1992, 1996, 1999 and 2004; Mark Garrett, 1996 Bareback Champion; Frank Thompson, 2000 Steer Wrestling Champ; 2001 Saddle Bronc Champion Tom Reeves; Jeff Willert, who emulated his fellow Belvidere cowboy by picking up the world Saddle Bronc crown in 2005; and Chad Ferley, who earned the 2006 Saddle Bronc Championship. At least six of them were present for the opening of the Rodeo Center.

Veteran rodeo announcer and radio personality Jim Thompson, who launched his radio career in Pierre, was back in town to host the tribute discussion Friday evening the 14th when many cowboy and cowgirl voices showcased all facets of the man and the legend that was and is Casey Tibbs.

Monte James emceed the Saturday nite dinner, where The Company Cowboys entertained in impeccable style, sparking countless fond memories of the late Kyle Evans and his musical legacy to the West. Rodeo Center project manager Mike Damani, designers Split Rock Studios and Chris Johnson, researcher Kate Craven and workhorses Diana Melvin and Janice Bartels were recognized for their major contributions to the creation and growth of the Center.

Student assistant Ashley Worth commented that much of it had been accomplished with only three months work. Janice and Diana can’t quit enumerating the many who have been instrumental in enabling the project to come together, the ones they cannot find enough words to thank… the donors, sponsors, encouragers, people who have shared history and artifacts, photos, insight and suggestions… the multitudinous pieces that unite to make a masterpiece. The names Jim and Peg Aplan came up again and again as “we couldn’t have done it without them” stories were related.

Fantastic prime rib and all the trimmings were served to the overflow crowd by members of the Pierre-Fort Pierre Rodeo Club and the local Mothers of Pre-Schoolers (MOPS) group. Many rodeo champions from several eras were introduced and honored. The size of the crowd prevented this writer from having full information as to who all was there – but some attendees whose names you’d recognize include Jack Buschbom, Alvin Nelson, Duane Howard, Jerry Olson, Pete Fredericks, Duane Reichert, Paul Tierney, Ote Berry, Marvin Garrett, Bryan Fulton, Frank Thompson, Larry O’Neil, Mr. & Mrs. Lyle Etbauer (parents of the famed Etbauer boys), and Gayla Sue Purcell and Glenda Dawn Hester (daughters of the late Pee Wee Morris) who came all the way from Indiana.

Saturday evening a beautiful selection of valuable donated items – many of them handmade, many contributed by board members or their families – were vied for and bought in both silent and live bidding. Auctioneer Brian Hanson kept buyers pitted against one another, and the event accrued some $8,000 to help fund the Foundation’s continuing vision for the Rodeo Center.

That vision encompasses construction of a courtyard patio, archival storage area, and continuing historical projects. This writer, having visited many museums and halls of fame, is truly impressed by the quality of the Rodeo Center – the design, the continuity, the variety and the completeness of the story it tells, the history it portrays. It is truly one of the finest I have enjoyed; and everyone who has taken a hand in its development should be saluted.

To learn more, go to http://www.caseytibbs.com; or stop by the beautiful facilty on the banks of the wide Missouri. To comment or contribute, contact the Rodeo Center at Box 37, Fort Pierre, SD 57532, or info@caseytibbs.com.

The broad beautiful, deceptively lazy-looking Missouri River has witnessed more history in progress than most any other part of America. Transporting a rare breed of wild, adventuresome, freedom-seeking humanity, it developed into the big artery nurturing the heart of the infant West… symbol of the pioneer spirit that made men and women willing to board some type of watercraft at St. Louis and brave whatever unknown and unexpected danger each bend and turn might bring.

How fitting that a modern-day tribute to the unbridled spirit of the cowboy stands today on a shale bluff overlooking a breathtaking vista of that very river! And what a tribute it is – the Casey Tibbs South Dakota Rodeo Center & Mattie Goff-Newcombe Conference Center; a museum devoted exclusively to the cowboy sports spawned by the 1880’s cattle industry across the West, and the continuing influence that culture exerts on South Dakota.

Looming above its hometown of Fort Pierre, the unassuming exterior of the Center is completely deceptive. Only the brilliant purple rodeo silhouettes – depicting Mattie performing the Liberty stand and Casey spurring a big saddle bronc in his inimitable style – hint at the colorful explosion of history and culture to be found inside.

Visitors are greeted and welcomed by breathtaking, life sized Tony Chytka bronzes of Casey getting down in the chute on a bronc and Mattie trick riding on her favorite horse – fitting centerpieces for the ground floor rotunda. The theater/viewing room showcasing the history of South Dakota rodeo stirs visitors’ adrenaline and sends chills down their spines as they experience a crash course in the sport. Moving on from there they discover exhibits highlighting rodeo producers, announcers, clowns, specialty acts and queens; and data on 4-H, Little Britches, High School, Intercollegiate, Indian, Pro and Amateur rodeo associations. Big screens feature video productions by Steve Hall and Dave Hobson profiling the lives and accomplishments of South Dakota’s 18 World Champions. Younger guests flock to interactive Bronc Room and Dress-Up areas, where they’re free to make hands-on connections to any facets of rodeo that inspire them, including a simulated 8-second roughstock ride.

A dedicated Casey Tibbs segment houses the largest collection of historic memorabilia highlighting the many-times World Champion cowboy’s colorful childhood, rugged youth, meteoric rodeo career and lasting contributions to the sport.

Attractive and historically-accurate interpretative signs front the many sparkling enclosed cases scattered throughout both floors of the Center, each displaying priceless rodeo or pioneer memorabilia. Glass-topped display stands, in wagon wheel motif, contain championship buckles, photos and awards earned by the many honorees. Realistic murals morph into touchable reality as you come face to face with the homemade wooden horse trailer in which Mattie Goff transported her trick riding horse.

Amplifying the museum concept, the state-of-the-art Mattie Goff Newcombe Conference Center offers every amenity for special events, meetings, conventions and receptions. Available for day and evening events, the Center can accommodate over 400 in stand-up receptions; the Theatre can seat 275-300. The full catering kitchen is equipped with dishes, flatware and serving pieces, and the dining area will easily seat 200-plus in rounds. Stereo sound permeates the meeting space, which is equipped with ample power floor outlets to accommodate laptop use and VCR/ DVD presentations. Polycom conference phone, Fax and copier business services, and both handheld and lavaliere wireless microphones are available, while parking is almost unlimited.

This amazing venue, “where legends live on,” was officially opened last weekend, Aug. 14-16, attracting visitors from across the nation, as far away as Arkansas, Texas, and Indiana. Overflow crowds for the three-day blowout enjoyed a large vendor’s showcase, an ongoing program of varied Western entertainment, cowboy breakfast, beef & beans chuckwagon cookout, honoree/sponsor/donor reception, “hog wild” barbecue, “Born to Buck” Champion’s Dinner; bull riding competition, street dance, and the arrival and parade of the Fort Bennett to Fort Pierre “Casey Tibbs Memorial Ride” Wagon Train. Special traveling art exhibits by Mick Harrison, Mavis Madison, John Lopez, Kat Thompson and Tony Chytka beautified the museum and grounds for the big weekend.

All this is fruition of the dreams and vision of Mattie Goff Newcombe and Casey Tibbs, supported and brought to reality by innumerable generous people who donated money, time, talent and artifacts to enhance the collection. The Casey Tibbs Foundation (a 501©3 not-for-profit institution with the purpose and mission to preserve the heritage of rodeo and the western culture of South Dakota while promoting athletic and educational activities and opportunities for both the young people and adult citizens of South Dakota) was begun in 1989. It started as rodeo supporters, friends and family members visited with Casey during his last year of life, catching his vision for a facility that would pay tribute not only to his personal rodeo record but also to all South Dakota rodeo legends. A Foundation Tribute Dinner has been held annually since 1990, where deserving South Dakotan’s have been honored in five categories each year – Ranch Cowboy Family, Past Rodeo Great, Rodeo Promoter, Present Rodeo Cowgirl Great and Present Rodeo Cowboy Great. Two walls in the second story of the Center are covered with photos and information about those South Dakota heroes.

The Foundation’s hardworking Board of Directors currently includes President Dayle Tibbs Angyal; Vice President Pat Duffy; Secretary Jessie Tibbs Keckler; and Treasurer Bernie Duffy. Other board members include Bryan Hanson, Dick Herman, Gary Johnson, Betty Lou Kost, Diana Melvin, Johnny Smith, and Larry Tibbs.

South Dakota has produced 18 World Champion cowboys and cowgirls since records have been kept. They include 1927 Trick Riding Champion Mattie Goff Newcombe; 1929 All Around Cowboy and 1929 and ’31 Saddle Bronc Champ Earl Thode; 1946 Bull Riding Champion Pee Wee Morris; Casey Tibbs, Saddle Bronc Champion of 1949, 1951-1954 and 1959 as well as 1951 Bareback Champion and All Around Cowboy of 1951 and 1955. Then there’s Jack Buschbom, 1949, 1959 and 1960 Bareback Champion; Alvin Nelson, 1957 Saddle Bronc Champ; Paul Tierney, 1970 Tie-Down Roping Champion and 1980 All Around Cowboy; Clint Johnson who was Saddle Bronc Champion in 1980, 1987, 1988 and 1989; Ote Berry, Steer Wrestling Champ in 1985, 1990, ’91 and ’95; Bareback Champion for 1988, 1989, 1994 and 1995 Marvin Garrett; and Robert Etbauer, Saddle Bronc Champion in 1990 and 1991. In Tie Down Roping Troy Pruitt is honored for his 1990 Championship; Billy Etbauer held Saddle Bronc titles in 1992, 1996, 1999 and 2004; Mark Garrett, 1996 Bareback Champion; Frank Thompson, 2000 Steer Wrestling Champ; 2001 Saddle Bronc Champion Tom Reeves; Jeff Willert, who emulated his fellow Belvidere cowboy by picking up the world Saddle Bronc crown in 2005; and Chad Ferley, who earned the 2006 Saddle Bronc Championship. At least six of them were present for the opening of the Rodeo Center.

Veteran rodeo announcer and radio personality Jim Thompson, who launched his radio career in Pierre, was back in town to host the tribute discussion Friday evening the 14th when many cowboy and cowgirl voices showcased all facets of the man and the legend that was and is Casey Tibbs.

Monte James emceed the Saturday nite dinner, where The Company Cowboys entertained in impeccable style, sparking countless fond memories of the late Kyle Evans and his musical legacy to the West. Rodeo Center project manager Mike Damani, designers Split Rock Studios and Chris Johnson, researcher Kate Craven and workhorses Diana Melvin and Janice Bartels were recognized for their major contributions to the creation and growth of the Center.

Student assistant Ashley Worth commented that much of it had been accomplished with only three months work. Janice and Diana can’t quit enumerating the many who have been instrumental in enabling the project to come together, the ones they cannot find enough words to thank… the donors, sponsors, encouragers, people who have shared history and artifacts, photos, insight and suggestions… the multitudinous pieces that unite to make a masterpiece. The names Jim and Peg Aplan came up again and again as “we couldn’t have done it without them” stories were related.

Fantastic prime rib and all the trimmings were served to the overflow crowd by members of the Pierre-Fort Pierre Rodeo Club and the local Mothers of Pre-Schoolers (MOPS) group. Many rodeo champions from several eras were introduced and honored. The size of the crowd prevented this writer from having full information as to who all was there – but some attendees whose names you’d recognize include Jack Buschbom, Alvin Nelson, Duane Howard, Jerry Olson, Pete Fredericks, Duane Reichert, Paul Tierney, Ote Berry, Marvin Garrett, Bryan Fulton, Frank Thompson, Larry O’Neil, Mr. & Mrs. Lyle Etbauer (parents of the famed Etbauer boys), and Gayla Sue Purcell and Glenda Dawn Hester (daughters of the late Pee Wee Morris) who came all the way from Indiana.

Saturday evening a beautiful selection of valuable donated items – many of them handmade, many contributed by board members or their families – were vied for and bought in both silent and live bidding. Auctioneer Brian Hanson kept buyers pitted against one another, and the event accrued some $8,000 to help fund the Foundation’s continuing vision for the Rodeo Center.

That vision encompasses construction of a courtyard patio, archival storage area, and continuing historical projects. This writer, having visited many museums and halls of fame, is truly impressed by the quality of the Rodeo Center – the design, the continuity, the variety and the completeness of the story it tells, the history it portrays. It is truly one of the finest I have enjoyed; and everyone who has taken a hand in its development should be saluted.

To learn more, go to http://www.caseytibbs.com; or stop by the beautiful facilty on the banks of the wide Missouri. To comment or contribute, contact the Rodeo Center at Box 37, Fort Pierre, SD 57532, or info@caseytibbs.com.

The broad beautiful, deceptively lazy-looking Missouri River has witnessed more history in progress than most any other part of America. Transporting a rare breed of wild, adventuresome, freedom-seeking humanity, it developed into the big artery nurturing the heart of the infant West… symbol of the pioneer spirit that made men and women willing to board some type of watercraft at St. Louis and brave whatever unknown and unexpected danger each bend and turn might bring.

How fitting that a modern-day tribute to the unbridled spirit of the cowboy stands today on a shale bluff overlooking a breathtaking vista of that very river! And what a tribute it is – the Casey Tibbs South Dakota Rodeo Center & Mattie Goff-Newcombe Conference Center; a museum devoted exclusively to the cowboy sports spawned by the 1880’s cattle industry across the West, and the continuing influence that culture exerts on South Dakota.

Looming above its hometown of Fort Pierre, the unassuming exterior of the Center is completely deceptive. Only the brilliant purple rodeo silhouettes – depicting Mattie performing the Liberty stand and Casey spurring a big saddle bronc in his inimitable style – hint at the colorful explosion of history and culture to be found inside.

Visitors are greeted and welcomed by breathtaking, life sized Tony Chytka bronzes of Casey getting down in the chute on a bronc and Mattie trick riding on her favorite horse – fitting centerpieces for the ground floor rotunda. The theater/viewing room showcasing the history of South Dakota rodeo stirs visitors’ adrenaline and sends chills down their spines as they experience a crash course in the sport. Moving on from there they discover exhibits highlighting rodeo producers, announcers, clowns, specialty acts and queens; and data on 4-H, Little Britches, High School, Intercollegiate, Indian, Pro and Amateur rodeo associations. Big screens feature video productions by Steve Hall and Dave Hobson profiling the lives and accomplishments of South Dakota’s 18 World Champions. Younger guests flock to interactive Bronc Room and Dress-Up areas, where they’re free to make hands-on connections to any facets of rodeo that inspire them, including a simulated 8-second roughstock ride.

A dedicated Casey Tibbs segment houses the largest collection of historic memorabilia highlighting the many-times World Champion cowboy’s colorful childhood, rugged youth, meteoric rodeo career and lasting contributions to the sport.

Attractive and historically-accurate interpretative signs front the many sparkling enclosed cases scattered throughout both floors of the Center, each displaying priceless rodeo or pioneer memorabilia. Glass-topped display stands, in wagon wheel motif, contain championship buckles, photos and awards earned by the many honorees. Realistic murals morph into touchable reality as you come face to face with the homemade wooden horse trailer in which Mattie Goff transported her trick riding horse.

Amplifying the museum concept, the state-of-the-art Mattie Goff Newcombe Conference Center offers every amenity for special events, meetings, conventions and receptions. Available for day and evening events, the Center can accommodate over 400 in stand-up receptions; the Theatre can seat 275-300. The full catering kitchen is equipped with dishes, flatware and serving pieces, and the dining area will easily seat 200-plus in rounds. Stereo sound permeates the meeting space, which is equipped with ample power floor outlets to accommodate laptop use and VCR/ DVD presentations. Polycom conference phone, Fax and copier business services, and both handheld and lavaliere wireless microphones are available, while parking is almost unlimited.

This amazing venue, “where legends live on,” was officially opened last weekend, Aug. 14-16, attracting visitors from across the nation, as far away as Arkansas, Texas, and Indiana. Overflow crowds for the three-day blowout enjoyed a large vendor’s showcase, an ongoing program of varied Western entertainment, cowboy breakfast, beef & beans chuckwagon cookout, honoree/sponsor/donor reception, “hog wild” barbecue, “Born to Buck” Champion’s Dinner; bull riding competition, street dance, and the arrival and parade of the Fort Bennett to Fort Pierre “Casey Tibbs Memorial Ride” Wagon Train. Special traveling art exhibits by Mick Harrison, Mavis Madison, John Lopez, Kat Thompson and Tony Chytka beautified the museum and grounds for the big weekend.

All this is fruition of the dreams and vision of Mattie Goff Newcombe and Casey Tibbs, supported and brought to reality by innumerable generous people who donated money, time, talent and artifacts to enhance the collection. The Casey Tibbs Foundation (a 501©3 not-for-profit institution with the purpose and mission to preserve the heritage of rodeo and the western culture of South Dakota while promoting athletic and educational activities and opportunities for both the young people and adult citizens of South Dakota) was begun in 1989. It started as rodeo supporters, friends and family members visited with Casey during his last year of life, catching his vision for a facility that would pay tribute not only to his personal rodeo record but also to all South Dakota rodeo legends. A Foundation Tribute Dinner has been held annually since 1990, where deserving South Dakotan’s have been honored in five categories each year – Ranch Cowboy Family, Past Rodeo Great, Rodeo Promoter, Present Rodeo Cowgirl Great and Present Rodeo Cowboy Great. Two walls in the second story of the Center are covered with photos and information about those South Dakota heroes.

The Foundation’s hardworking Board of Directors currently includes President Dayle Tibbs Angyal; Vice President Pat Duffy; Secretary Jessie Tibbs Keckler; and Treasurer Bernie Duffy. Other board members include Bryan Hanson, Dick Herman, Gary Johnson, Betty Lou Kost, Diana Melvin, Johnny Smith, and Larry Tibbs.

South Dakota has produced 18 World Champion cowboys and cowgirls since records have been kept. They include 1927 Trick Riding Champion Mattie Goff Newcombe; 1929 All Around Cowboy and 1929 and ’31 Saddle Bronc Champ Earl Thode; 1946 Bull Riding Champion Pee Wee Morris; Casey Tibbs, Saddle Bronc Champion of 1949, 1951-1954 and 1959 as well as 1951 Bareback Champion and All Around Cowboy of 1951 and 1955. Then there’s Jack Buschbom, 1949, 1959 and 1960 Bareback Champion; Alvin Nelson, 1957 Saddle Bronc Champ; Paul Tierney, 1970 Tie-Down Roping Champion and 1980 All Around Cowboy; Clint Johnson who was Saddle Bronc Champion in 1980, 1987, 1988 and 1989; Ote Berry, Steer Wrestling Champ in 1985, 1990, ’91 and ’95; Bareback Champion for 1988, 1989, 1994 and 1995 Marvin Garrett; and Robert Etbauer, Saddle Bronc Champion in 1990 and 1991. In Tie Down Roping Troy Pruitt is honored for his 1990 Championship; Billy Etbauer held Saddle Bronc titles in 1992, 1996, 1999 and 2004; Mark Garrett, 1996 Bareback Champion; Frank Thompson, 2000 Steer Wrestling Champ; 2001 Saddle Bronc Champion Tom Reeves; Jeff Willert, who emulated his fellow Belvidere cowboy by picking up the world Saddle Bronc crown in 2005; and Chad Ferley, who earned the 2006 Saddle Bronc Championship. At least six of them were present for the opening of the Rodeo Center.

Veteran rodeo announcer and radio personality Jim Thompson, who launched his radio career in Pierre, was back in town to host the tribute discussion Friday evening the 14th when many cowboy and cowgirl voices showcased all facets of the man and the legend that was and is Casey Tibbs.

Monte James emceed the Saturday nite dinner, where The Company Cowboys entertained in impeccable style, sparking countless fond memories of the late Kyle Evans and his musical legacy to the West. Rodeo Center project manager Mike Damani, designers Split Rock Studios and Chris Johnson, researcher Kate Craven and workhorses Diana Melvin and Janice Bartels were recognized for their major contributions to the creation and growth of the Center.

Student assistant Ashley Worth commented that much of it had been accomplished with only three months work. Janice and Diana can’t quit enumerating the many who have been instrumental in enabling the project to come together, the ones they cannot find enough words to thank… the donors, sponsors, encouragers, people who have shared history and artifacts, photos, insight and suggestions… the multitudinous pieces that unite to make a masterpiece. The names Jim and Peg Aplan came up again and again as “we couldn’t have done it without them” stories were related.

Fantastic prime rib and all the trimmings were served to the overflow crowd by members of the Pierre-Fort Pierre Rodeo Club and the local Mothers of Pre-Schoolers (MOPS) group. Many rodeo champions from several eras were introduced and honored. The size of the crowd prevented this writer from having full information as to who all was there – but some attendees whose names you’d recognize include Jack Buschbom, Alvin Nelson, Duane Howard, Jerry Olson, Pete Fredericks, Duane Reichert, Paul Tierney, Ote Berry, Marvin Garrett, Bryan Fulton, Frank Thompson, Larry O’Neil, Mr. & Mrs. Lyle Etbauer (parents of the famed Etbauer boys), and Gayla Sue Purcell and Glenda Dawn Hester (daughters of the late Pee Wee Morris) who came all the way from Indiana.

Saturday evening a beautiful selection of valuable donated items – many of them handmade, many contributed by board members or their families – were vied for and bought in both silent and live bidding. Auctioneer Brian Hanson kept buyers pitted against one another, and the event accrued some $8,000 to help fund the Foundation’s continuing vision for the Rodeo Center.

That vision encompasses construction of a courtyard patio, archival storage area, and continuing historical projects. This writer, having visited many museums and halls of fame, is truly impressed by the quality of the Rodeo Center – the design, the continuity, the variety and the completeness of the story it tells, the history it portrays. It is truly one of the finest I have enjoyed; and everyone who has taken a hand in its development should be saluted.

To learn more, go to http://www.caseytibbs.com; or stop by the beautiful facilty on the banks of the wide Missouri. To comment or contribute, contact the Rodeo Center at Box 37, Fort Pierre, SD 57532, or info@caseytibbs.com.

The broad beautiful, deceptively lazy-looking Missouri River has witnessed more history in progress than most any other part of America. Transporting a rare breed of wild, adventuresome, freedom-seeking humanity, it developed into the big artery nurturing the heart of the infant West… symbol of the pioneer spirit that made men and women willing to board some type of watercraft at St. Louis and brave whatever unknown and unexpected danger each bend and turn might bring.

How fitting that a modern-day tribute to the unbridled spirit of the cowboy stands today on a shale bluff overlooking a breathtaking vista of that very river! And what a tribute it is – the Casey Tibbs South Dakota Rodeo Center & Mattie Goff-Newcombe Conference Center; a museum devoted exclusively to the cowboy sports spawned by the 1880’s cattle industry across the West, and the continuing influence that culture exerts on South Dakota.

Looming above its hometown of Fort Pierre, the unassuming exterior of the Center is completely deceptive. Only the brilliant purple rodeo silhouettes – depicting Mattie performing the Liberty stand and Casey spurring a big saddle bronc in his inimitable style – hint at the colorful explosion of history and culture to be found inside.

Visitors are greeted and welcomed by breathtaking, life sized Tony Chytka bronzes of Casey getting down in the chute on a bronc and Mattie trick riding on her favorite horse – fitting centerpieces for the ground floor rotunda. The theater/viewing room showcasing the history of South Dakota rodeo stirs visitors’ adrenaline and sends chills down their spines as they experience a crash course in the sport. Moving on from there they discover exhibits highlighting rodeo producers, announcers, clowns, specialty acts and queens; and data on 4-H, Little Britches, High School, Intercollegiate, Indian, Pro and Amateur rodeo associations. Big screens feature video productions by Steve Hall and Dave Hobson profiling the lives and accomplishments of South Dakota’s 18 World Champions. Younger guests flock to interactive Bronc Room and Dress-Up areas, where they’re free to make hands-on connections to any facets of rodeo that inspire them, including a simulated 8-second roughstock ride.

A dedicated Casey Tibbs segment houses the largest collection of historic memorabilia highlighting the many-times World Champion cowboy’s colorful childhood, rugged youth, meteoric rodeo career and lasting contributions to the sport.

Attractive and historically-accurate interpretative signs front the many sparkling enclosed cases scattered throughout both floors of the Center, each displaying priceless rodeo or pioneer memorabilia. Glass-topped display stands, in wagon wheel motif, contain championship buckles, photos and awards earned by the many honorees. Realistic murals morph into touchable reality as you come face to face with the homemade wooden horse trailer in which Mattie Goff transported her trick riding horse.

Amplifying the museum concept, the state-of-the-art Mattie Goff Newcombe Conference Center offers every amenity for special events, meetings, conventions and receptions. Available for day and evening events, the Center can accommodate over 400 in stand-up receptions; the Theatre can seat 275-300. The full catering kitchen is equipped with dishes, flatware and serving pieces, and the dining area will easily seat 200-plus in rounds. Stereo sound permeates the meeting space, which is equipped with ample power floor outlets to accommodate laptop use and VCR/ DVD presentations. Polycom conference phone, Fax and copier business services, and both handheld and lavaliere wireless microphones are available, while parking is almost unlimited.

This amazing venue, “where legends live on,” was officially opened last weekend, Aug. 14-16, attracting visitors from across the nation, as far away as Arkansas, Texas, and Indiana. Overflow crowds for the three-day blowout enjoyed a large vendor’s showcase, an ongoing program of varied Western entertainment, cowboy breakfast, beef & beans chuckwagon cookout, honoree/sponsor/donor reception, “hog wild” barbecue, “Born to Buck” Champion’s Dinner; bull riding competition, street dance, and the arrival and parade of the Fort Bennett to Fort Pierre “Casey Tibbs Memorial Ride” Wagon Train. Special traveling art exhibits by Mick Harrison, Mavis Madison, John Lopez, Kat Thompson and Tony Chytka beautified the museum and grounds for the big weekend.

All this is fruition of the dreams and vision of Mattie Goff Newcombe and Casey Tibbs, supported and brought to reality by innumerable generous people who donated money, time, talent and artifacts to enhance the collection. The Casey Tibbs Foundation (a 501©3 not-for-profit institution with the purpose and mission to preserve the heritage of rodeo and the western culture of South Dakota while promoting athletic and educational activities and opportunities for both the young people and adult citizens of South Dakota) was begun in 1989. It started as rodeo supporters, friends and family members visited with Casey during his last year of life, catching his vision for a facility that would pay tribute not only to his personal rodeo record but also to all South Dakota rodeo legends. A Foundation Tribute Dinner has been held annually since 1990, where deserving South Dakotan’s have been honored in five categories each year – Ranch Cowboy Family, Past Rodeo Great, Rodeo Promoter, Present Rodeo Cowgirl Great and Present Rodeo Cowboy Great. Two walls in the second story of the Center are covered with photos and information about those South Dakota heroes.

The Foundation’s hardworking Board of Directors currently includes President Dayle Tibbs Angyal; Vice President Pat Duffy; Secretary Jessie Tibbs Keckler; and Treasurer Bernie Duffy. Other board members include Bryan Hanson, Dick Herman, Gary Johnson, Betty Lou Kost, Diana Melvin, Johnny Smith, and Larry Tibbs.

South Dakota has produced 18 World Champion cowboys and cowgirls since records have been kept. They include 1927 Trick Riding Champion Mattie Goff Newcombe; 1929 All Around Cowboy and 1929 and ’31 Saddle Bronc Champ Earl Thode; 1946 Bull Riding Champion Pee Wee Morris; Casey Tibbs, Saddle Bronc Champion of 1949, 1951-1954 and 1959 as well as 1951 Bareback Champion and All Around Cowboy of 1951 and 1955. Then there’s Jack Buschbom, 1949, 1959 and 1960 Bareback Champion; Alvin Nelson, 1957 Saddle Bronc Champ; Paul Tierney, 1970 Tie-Down Roping Champion and 1980 All Around Cowboy; Clint Johnson who was Saddle Bronc Champion in 1980, 1987, 1988 and 1989; Ote Berry, Steer Wrestling Champ in 1985, 1990, ’91 and ’95; Bareback Champion for 1988, 1989, 1994 and 1995 Marvin Garrett; and Robert Etbauer, Saddle Bronc Champion in 1990 and 1991. In Tie Down Roping Troy Pruitt is honored for his 1990 Championship; Billy Etbauer held Saddle Bronc titles in 1992, 1996, 1999 and 2004; Mark Garrett, 1996 Bareback Champion; Frank Thompson, 2000 Steer Wrestling Champ; 2001 Saddle Bronc Champion Tom Reeves; Jeff Willert, who emulated his fellow Belvidere cowboy by picking up the world Saddle Bronc crown in 2005; and Chad Ferley, who earned the 2006 Saddle Bronc Championship. At least six of them were present for the opening of the Rodeo Center.

Veteran rodeo announcer and radio personality Jim Thompson, who launched his radio career in Pierre, was back in town to host the tribute discussion Friday evening the 14th when many cowboy and cowgirl voices showcased all facets of the man and the legend that was and is Casey Tibbs.

Monte James emceed the Saturday nite dinner, where The Company Cowboys entertained in impeccable style, sparking countless fond memories of the late Kyle Evans and his musical legacy to the West. Rodeo Center project manager Mike Damani, designers Split Rock Studios and Chris Johnson, researcher Kate Craven and workhorses Diana Melvin and Janice Bartels were recognized for their major contributions to the creation and growth of the Center.

Student assistant Ashley Worth commented that much of it had been accomplished with only three months work. Janice and Diana can’t quit enumerating the many who have been instrumental in enabling the project to come together, the ones they cannot find enough words to thank… the donors, sponsors, encouragers, people who have shared history and artifacts, photos, insight and suggestions… the multitudinous pieces that unite to make a masterpiece. The names Jim and Peg Aplan came up again and again as “we couldn’t have done it without them” stories were related.

Fantastic prime rib and all the trimmings were served to the overflow crowd by members of the Pierre-Fort Pierre Rodeo Club and the local Mothers of Pre-Schoolers (MOPS) group. Many rodeo champions from several eras were introduced and honored. The size of the crowd prevented this writer from having full information as to who all was there – but some attendees whose names you’d recognize include Jack Buschbom, Alvin Nelson, Duane Howard, Jerry Olson, Pete Fredericks, Duane Reichert, Paul Tierney, Ote Berry, Marvin Garrett, Bryan Fulton, Frank Thompson, Larry O’Neil, Mr. & Mrs. Lyle Etbauer (parents of the famed Etbauer boys), and Gayla Sue Purcell and Glenda Dawn Hester (daughters of the late Pee Wee Morris) who came all the way from Indiana.

Saturday evening a beautiful selection of valuable donated items – many of them handmade, many contributed by board members or their families – were vied for and bought in both silent and live bidding. Auctioneer Brian Hanson kept buyers pitted against one another, and the event accrued some $8,000 to help fund the Foundation’s continuing vision for the Rodeo Center.

That vision encompasses construction of a courtyard patio, archival storage area, and continuing historical projects. This writer, having visited many museums and halls of fame, is truly impressed by the quality of the Rodeo Center – the design, the continuity, the variety and the completeness of the story it tells, the history it portrays. It is truly one of the finest I have enjoyed; and everyone who has taken a hand in its development should be saluted.

To learn more, go to http://www.caseytibbs.com; or stop by the beautiful facilty on the banks of the wide Missouri. To comment or contribute, contact the Rodeo Center at Box 37, Fort Pierre, SD 57532, or info@caseytibbs.com.

The broad beautiful, deceptively lazy-looking Missouri River has witnessed more history in progress than most any other part of America. Transporting a rare breed of wild, adventuresome, freedom-seeking humanity, it developed into the big artery nurturing the heart of the infant West… symbol of the pioneer spirit that made men and women willing to board some type of watercraft at St. Louis and brave whatever unknown and unexpected danger each bend and turn might bring.

How fitting that a modern-day tribute to the unbridled spirit of the cowboy stands today on a shale bluff overlooking a breathtaking vista of that very river! And what a tribute it is – the Casey Tibbs South Dakota Rodeo Center & Mattie Goff-Newcombe Conference Center; a museum devoted exclusively to the cowboy sports spawned by the 1880’s cattle industry across the West, and the continuing influence that culture exerts on South Dakota.

Looming above its hometown of Fort Pierre, the unassuming exterior of the Center is completely deceptive. Only the brilliant purple rodeo silhouettes – depicting Mattie performing the Liberty stand and Casey spurring a big saddle bronc in his inimitable style – hint at the colorful explosion of history and culture to be found inside.

Visitors are greeted and welcomed by breathtaking, life sized Tony Chytka bronzes of Casey getting down in the chute on a bronc and Mattie trick riding on her favorite horse – fitting centerpieces for the ground floor rotunda. The theater/viewing room showcasing the history of South Dakota rodeo stirs visitors’ adrenaline and sends chills down their spines as they experience a crash course in the sport. Moving on from there they discover exhibits highlighting rodeo producers, announcers, clowns, specialty acts and queens; and data on 4-H, Little Britches, High School, Intercollegiate, Indian, Pro and Amateur rodeo associations. Big screens feature video productions by Steve Hall and Dave Hobson profiling the lives and accomplishments of South Dakota’s 18 World Champions. Younger guests flock to interactive Bronc Room and Dress-Up areas, where they’re free to make hands-on connections to any facets of rodeo that inspire them, including a simulated 8-second roughstock ride.

A dedicated Casey Tibbs segment houses the largest collection of historic memorabilia highlighting the many-times World Champion cowboy’s colorful childhood, rugged youth, meteoric rodeo career and lasting contributions to the sport.

Attractive and historically-accurate interpretative signs front the many sparkling enclosed cases scattered throughout both floors of the Center, each displaying priceless rodeo or pioneer memorabilia. Glass-topped display stands, in wagon wheel motif, contain championship buckles, photos and awards earned by the many honorees. Realistic murals morph into touchable reality as you come face to face with the homemade wooden horse trailer in which Mattie Goff transported her trick riding horse.

Amplifying the museum concept, the state-of-the-art Mattie Goff Newcombe Conference Center offers every amenity for special events, meetings, conventions and receptions. Available for day and evening events, the Center can accommodate over 400 in stand-up receptions; the Theatre can seat 275-300. The full catering kitchen is equipped with dishes, flatware and serving pieces, and the dining area will easily seat 200-plus in rounds. Stereo sound permeates the meeting space, which is equipped with ample power floor outlets to accommodate laptop use and VCR/ DVD presentations. Polycom conference phone, Fax and copier business services, and both handheld and lavaliere wireless microphones are available, while parking is almost unlimited.

This amazing venue, “where legends live on,” was officially opened last weekend, Aug. 14-16, attracting visitors from across the nation, as far away as Arkansas, Texas, and Indiana. Overflow crowds for the three-day blowout enjoyed a large vendor’s showcase, an ongoing program of varied Western entertainment, cowboy breakfast, beef & beans chuckwagon cookout, honoree/sponsor/donor reception, “hog wild” barbecue, “Born to Buck” Champion’s Dinner; bull riding competition, street dance, and the arrival and parade of the Fort Bennett to Fort Pierre “Casey Tibbs Memorial Ride” Wagon Train. Special traveling art exhibits by Mick Harrison, Mavis Madison, John Lopez, Kat Thompson and Tony Chytka beautified the museum and grounds for the big weekend.

All this is fruition of the dreams and vision of Mattie Goff Newcombe and Casey Tibbs, supported and brought to reality by innumerable generous people who donated money, time, talent and artifacts to enhance the collection. The Casey Tibbs Foundation (a 501©3 not-for-profit institution with the purpose and mission to preserve the heritage of rodeo and the western culture of South Dakota while promoting athletic and educational activities and opportunities for both the young people and adult citizens of South Dakota) was begun in 1989. It started as rodeo supporters, friends and family members visited with Casey during his last year of life, catching his vision for a facility that would pay tribute not only to his personal rodeo record but also to all South Dakota rodeo legends. A Foundation Tribute Dinner has been held annually since 1990, where deserving South Dakotan’s have been honored in five categories each year – Ranch Cowboy Family, Past Rodeo Great, Rodeo Promoter, Present Rodeo Cowgirl Great and Present Rodeo Cowboy Great. Two walls in the second story of the Center are covered with photos and information about those South Dakota heroes.

The Foundation’s hardworking Board of Directors currently includes President Dayle Tibbs Angyal; Vice President Pat Duffy; Secretary Jessie Tibbs Keckler; and Treasurer Bernie Duffy. Other board members include Bryan Hanson, Dick Herman, Gary Johnson, Betty Lou Kost, Diana Melvin, Johnny Smith, and Larry Tibbs.

South Dakota has produced 18 World Champion cowboys and cowgirls since records have been kept. They include 1927 Trick Riding Champion Mattie Goff Newcombe; 1929 All Around Cowboy and 1929 and ’31 Saddle Bronc Champ Earl Thode; 1946 Bull Riding Champion Pee Wee Morris; Casey Tibbs, Saddle Bronc Champion of 1949, 1951-1954 and 1959 as well as 1951 Bareback Champion and All Around Cowboy of 1951 and 1955. Then there’s Jack Buschbom, 1949, 1959 and 1960 Bareback Champion; Alvin Nelson, 1957 Saddle Bronc Champ; Paul Tierney, 1970 Tie-Down Roping Champion and 1980 All Around Cowboy; Clint Johnson who was Saddle Bronc Champion in 1980, 1987, 1988 and 1989; Ote Berry, Steer Wrestling Champ in 1985, 1990, ’91 and ’95; Bareback Champion for 1988, 1989, 1994 and 1995 Marvin Garrett; and Robert Etbauer, Saddle Bronc Champion in 1990 and 1991. In Tie Down Roping Troy Pruitt is honored for his 1990 Championship; Billy Etbauer held Saddle Bronc titles in 1992, 1996, 1999 and 2004; Mark Garrett, 1996 Bareback Champion; Frank Thompson, 2000 Steer Wrestling Champ; 2001 Saddle Bronc Champion Tom Reeves; Jeff Willert, who emulated his fellow Belvidere cowboy by picking up the world Saddle Bronc crown in 2005; and Chad Ferley, who earned the 2006 Saddle Bronc Championship. At least six of them were present for the opening of the Rodeo Center.

Veteran rodeo announcer and radio personality Jim Thompson, who launched his radio career in Pierre, was back in town to host the tribute discussion Friday evening the 14th when many cowboy and cowgirl voices showcased all facets of the man and the legend that was and is Casey Tibbs.

Monte James emceed the Saturday nite dinner, where The Company Cowboys entertained in impeccable style, sparking countless fond memories of the late Kyle Evans and his musical legacy to the West. Rodeo Center project manager Mike Damani, designers Split Rock Studios and Chris Johnson, researcher Kate Craven and workhorses Diana Melvin and Janice Bartels were recognized for their major contributions to the creation and growth of the Center.

Student assistant Ashley Worth commented that much of it had been accomplished with only three months work. Janice and Diana can’t quit enumerating the many who have been instrumental in enabling the project to come together, the ones they cannot find enough words to thank… the donors, sponsors, encouragers, people who have shared history and artifacts, photos, insight and suggestions… the multitudinous pieces that unite to make a masterpiece. The names Jim and Peg Aplan came up again and again as “we couldn’t have done it without them” stories were related.

Fantastic prime rib and all the trimmings were served to the overflow crowd by members of the Pierre-Fort Pierre Rodeo Club and the local Mothers of Pre-Schoolers (MOPS) group. Many rodeo champions from several eras were introduced and honored. The size of the crowd prevented this writer from having full information as to who all was there – but some attendees whose names you’d recognize include Jack Buschbom, Alvin Nelson, Duane Howard, Jerry Olson, Pete Fredericks, Duane Reichert, Paul Tierney, Ote Berry, Marvin Garrett, Bryan Fulton, Frank Thompson, Larry O’Neil, Mr. & Mrs. Lyle Etbauer (parents of the famed Etbauer boys), and Gayla Sue Purcell and Glenda Dawn Hester (daughters of the late Pee Wee Morris) who came all the way from Indiana.

Saturday evening a beautiful selection of valuable donated items – many of them handmade, many contributed by board members or their families – were vied for and bought in both silent and live bidding. Auctioneer Brian Hanson kept buyers pitted against one another, and the event accrued some $8,000 to help fund the Foundation’s continuing vision for the Rodeo Center.

That vision encompasses construction of a courtyard patio, archival storage area, and continuing historical projects. This writer, having visited many museums and halls of fame, is truly impressed by the quality of the Rodeo Center – the design, the continuity, the variety and the completeness of the story it tells, the history it portrays. It is truly one of the finest I have enjoyed; and everyone who has taken a hand in its development should be saluted.

To learn more, go to http://www.caseytibbs.com; or stop by the beautiful facilty on the banks of the wide Missouri. To comment or contribute, contact the Rodeo Center at Box 37, Fort Pierre, SD 57532, or info@caseytibbs.com.

The broad beautiful, deceptively lazy-looking Missouri River has witnessed more history in progress than most any other part of America. Transporting a rare breed of wild, adventuresome, freedom-seeking humanity, it developed into the big artery nurturing the heart of the infant West… symbol of the pioneer spirit that made men and women willing to board some type of watercraft at St. Louis and brave whatever unknown and unexpected danger each bend and turn might bring.

How fitting that a modern-day tribute to the unbridled spirit of the cowboy stands today on a shale bluff overlooking a breathtaking vista of that very river! And what a tribute it is – the Casey Tibbs South Dakota Rodeo Center & Mattie Goff-Newcombe Conference Center; a museum devoted exclusively to the cowboy sports spawned by the 1880’s cattle industry across the West, and the continuing influence that culture exerts on South Dakota.

Looming above its hometown of Fort Pierre, the unassuming exterior of the Center is completely deceptive. Only the brilliant purple rodeo silhouettes – depicting Mattie performing the Liberty stand and Casey spurring a big saddle bronc in his inimitable style – hint at the colorful explosion of history and culture to be found inside.

Visitors are greeted and welcomed by breathtaking, life sized Tony Chytka bronzes of Casey getting down in the chute on a bronc and Mattie trick riding on her favorite horse – fitting centerpieces for the ground floor rotunda. The theater/viewing room showcasing the history of South Dakota rodeo stirs visitors’ adrenaline and sends chills down their spines as they experience a crash course in the sport. Moving on from there they discover exhibits highlighting rodeo producers, announcers, clowns, specialty acts and queens; and data on 4-H, Little Britches, High School, Intercollegiate, Indian, Pro and Amateur rodeo associations. Big screens feature video productions by Steve Hall and Dave Hobson profiling the lives and accomplishments of South Dakota’s 18 World Champions. Younger guests flock to interactive Bronc Room and Dress-Up areas, where they’re free to make hands-on connections to any facets of rodeo that inspire them, including a simulated 8-second roughstock ride.

A dedicated Casey Tibbs segment houses the largest collection of historic memorabilia highlighting the many-times World Champion cowboy’s colorful childhood, rugged youth, meteoric rodeo career and lasting contributions to the sport.

Attractive and historically-accurate interpretative signs front the many sparkling enclosed cases scattered throughout both floors of the Center, each displaying priceless rodeo or pioneer memorabilia. Glass-topped display stands, in wagon wheel motif, contain championship buckles, photos and awards earned by the many honorees. Realistic murals morph into touchable reality as you come face to face with the homemade wooden horse trailer in which Mattie Goff transported her trick riding horse.

Amplifying the museum concept, the state-of-the-art Mattie Goff Newcombe Conference Center offers every amenity for special events, meetings, conventions and receptions. Available for day and evening events, the Center can accommodate over 400 in stand-up receptions; the Theatre can seat 275-300. The full catering kitchen is equipped with dishes, flatware and serving pieces, and the dining area will easily seat 200-plus in rounds. Stereo sound permeates the meeting space, which is equipped with ample power floor outlets to accommodate laptop use and VCR/ DVD presentations. Polycom conference phone, Fax and copier business services, and both handheld and lavaliere wireless microphones are available, while parking is almost unlimited.

This amazing venue, “where legends live on,” was officially opened last weekend, Aug. 14-16, attracting visitors from across the nation, as far away as Arkansas, Texas, and Indiana. Overflow crowds for the three-day blowout enjoyed a large vendor’s showcase, an ongoing program of varied Western entertainment, cowboy breakfast, beef & beans chuckwagon cookout, honoree/sponsor/donor reception, “hog wild” barbecue, “Born to Buck” Champion’s Dinner; bull riding competition, street dance, and the arrival and parade of the Fort Bennett to Fort Pierre “Casey Tibbs Memorial Ride” Wagon Train. Special traveling art exhibits by Mick Harrison, Mavis Madison, John Lopez, Kat Thompson and Tony Chytka beautified the museum and grounds for the big weekend.

All this is fruition of the dreams and vision of Mattie Goff Newcombe and Casey Tibbs, supported and brought to reality by innumerable generous people who donated money, time, talent and artifacts to enhance the collection. The Casey Tibbs Foundation (a 501©3 not-for-profit institution with the purpose and mission to preserve the heritage of rodeo and the western culture of South Dakota while promoting athletic and educational activities and opportunities for both the young people and adult citizens of South Dakota) was begun in 1989. It started as rodeo supporters, friends and family members visited with Casey during his last year of life, catching his vision for a facility that would pay tribute not only to his personal rodeo record but also to all South Dakota rodeo legends. A Foundation Tribute Dinner has been held annually since 1990, where deserving South Dakotan’s have been honored in five categories each year – Ranch Cowboy Family, Past Rodeo Great, Rodeo Promoter, Present Rodeo Cowgirl Great and Present Rodeo Cowboy Great. Two walls in the second story of the Center are covered with photos and information about those South Dakota heroes.

The Foundation’s hardworking Board of Directors currently includes President Dayle Tibbs Angyal; Vice President Pat Duffy; Secretary Jessie Tibbs Keckler; and Treasurer Bernie Duffy. Other board members include Bryan Hanson, Dick Herman, Gary Johnson, Betty Lou Kost, Diana Melvin, Johnny Smith, and Larry Tibbs.

South Dakota has produced 18 World Champion cowboys and cowgirls since records have been kept. They include 1927 Trick Riding Champion Mattie Goff Newcombe; 1929 All Around Cowboy and 1929 and ’31 Saddle Bronc Champ Earl Thode; 1946 Bull Riding Champion Pee Wee Morris; Casey Tibbs, Saddle Bronc Champion of 1949, 1951-1954 and 1959 as well as 1951 Bareback Champion and All Around Cowboy of 1951 and 1955. Then there’s Jack Buschbom, 1949, 1959 and 1960 Bareback Champion; Alvin Nelson, 1957 Saddle Bronc Champ; Paul Tierney, 1970 Tie-Down Roping Champion and 1980 All Around Cowboy; Clint Johnson who was Saddle Bronc Champion in 1980, 1987, 1988 and 1989; Ote Berry, Steer Wrestling Champ in 1985, 1990, ’91 and ’95; Bareback Champion for 1988, 1989, 1994 and 1995 Marvin Garrett; and Robert Etbauer, Saddle Bronc Champion in 1990 and 1991. In Tie Down Roping Troy Pruitt is honored for his 1990 Championship; Billy Etbauer held Saddle Bronc titles in 1992, 1996, 1999 and 2004; Mark Garrett, 1996 Bareback Champion; Frank Thompson, 2000 Steer Wrestling Champ; 2001 Saddle Bronc Champion Tom Reeves; Jeff Willert, who emulated his fellow Belvidere cowboy by picking up the world Saddle Bronc crown in 2005; and Chad Ferley, who earned the 2006 Saddle Bronc Championship. At least six of them were present for the opening of the Rodeo Center.

Veteran rodeo announcer and radio personality Jim Thompson, who launched his radio career in Pierre, was back in town to host the tribute discussion Friday evening the 14th when many cowboy and cowgirl voices showcased all facets of the man and the legend that was and is Casey Tibbs.

Monte James emceed the Saturday nite dinner, where The Company Cowboys entertained in impeccable style, sparking countless fond memories of the late Kyle Evans and his musical legacy to the West. Rodeo Center project manager Mike Damani, designers Split Rock Studios and Chris Johnson, researcher Kate Craven and workhorses Diana Melvin and Janice Bartels were recognized for their major contributions to the creation and growth of the Center.

Student assistant Ashley Worth commented that much of it had been accomplished with only three months work. Janice and Diana can’t quit enumerating the many who have been instrumental in enabling the project to come together, the ones they cannot find enough words to thank… the donors, sponsors, encouragers, people who have shared history and artifacts, photos, insight and suggestions… the multitudinous pieces that unite to make a masterpiece. The names Jim and Peg Aplan came up again and again as “we couldn’t have done it without them” stories were related.

Fantastic prime rib and all the trimmings were served to the overflow crowd by members of the Pierre-Fort Pierre Rodeo Club and the local Mothers of Pre-Schoolers (MOPS) group. Many rodeo champions from several eras were introduced and honored. The size of the crowd prevented this writer from having full information as to who all was there – but some attendees whose names you’d recognize include Jack Buschbom, Alvin Nelson, Duane Howard, Jerry Olson, Pete Fredericks, Duane Reichert, Paul Tierney, Ote Berry, Marvin Garrett, Bryan Fulton, Frank Thompson, Larry O’Neil, Mr. & Mrs. Lyle Etbauer (parents of the famed Etbauer boys), and Gayla Sue Purcell and Glenda Dawn Hester (daughters of the late Pee Wee Morris) who came all the way from Indiana.

Saturday evening a beautiful selection of valuable donated items – many of them handmade, many contributed by board members or their families – were vied for and bought in both silent and live bidding. Auctioneer Brian Hanson kept buyers pitted against one another, and the event accrued some $8,000 to help fund the Foundation’s continuing vision for the Rodeo Center.

That vision encompasses construction of a courtyard patio, archival storage area, and continuing historical projects. This writer, having visited many museums and halls of fame, is truly impressed by the quality of the Rodeo Center – the design, the continuity, the variety and the completeness of the story it tells, the history it portrays. It is truly one of the finest I have enjoyed; and everyone who has taken a hand in its development should be saluted.

To learn more, go to http://www.caseytibbs.com; or stop by the beautiful facilty on the banks of the wide Missouri. To comment or contribute, contact the Rodeo Center at Box 37, Fort Pierre, SD 57532, or info@caseytibbs.com.

The broad beautiful, deceptively lazy-looking Missouri River has witnessed more history in progress than most any other part of America. Transporting a rare breed of wild, adventuresome, freedom-seeking humanity, it developed into the big artery nurturing the heart of the infant West… symbol of the pioneer spirit that made men and women willing to board some type of watercraft at St. Louis and brave whatever unknown and unexpected danger each bend and turn might bring.

How fitting that a modern-day tribute to the unbridled spirit of the cowboy stands today on a shale bluff overlooking a breathtaking vista of that very river! And what a tribute it is – the Casey Tibbs South Dakota Rodeo Center & Mattie Goff-Newcombe Conference Center; a museum devoted exclusively to the cowboy sports spawned by the 1880’s cattle industry across the West, and the continuing influence that culture exerts on South Dakota.

Looming above its hometown of Fort Pierre, the unassuming exterior of the Center is completely deceptive. Only the brilliant purple rodeo silhouettes – depicting Mattie performing the Liberty stand and Casey spurring a big saddle bronc in his inimitable style – hint at the colorful explosion of history and culture to be found inside.

Visitors are greeted and welcomed by breathtaking, life sized Tony Chytka bronzes of Casey getting down in the chute on a bronc and Mattie trick riding on her favorite horse – fitting centerpieces for the ground floor rotunda. The theater/viewing room showcasing the history of South Dakota rodeo stirs visitors’ adrenaline and sends chills down their spines as they experience a crash course in the sport. Moving on from there they discover exhibits highlighting rodeo producers, announcers, clowns, specialty acts and queens; and data on 4-H, Little Britches, High School, Intercollegiate, Indian, Pro and Amateur rodeo associations. Big screens feature video productions by Steve Hall and Dave Hobson profiling the lives and accomplishments of South Dakota’s 18 World Champions. Younger guests flock to interactive Bronc Room and Dress-Up areas, where they’re free to make hands-on connections to any facets of rodeo that inspire them, including a simulated 8-second roughstock ride.

A dedicated Casey Tibbs segment houses the largest collection of historic memorabilia highlighting the many-times World Champion cowboy’s colorful childhood, rugged youth, meteoric rodeo career and lasting contributions to the sport.

Attractive and historically-accurate interpretative signs front the many sparkling enclosed cases scattered throughout both floors of the Center, each displaying priceless rodeo or pioneer memorabilia. Glass-topped display stands, in wagon wheel motif, contain championship buckles, photos and awards earned by the many honorees. Realistic murals morph into touchable reality as you come face to face with the homemade wooden horse trailer in which Mattie Goff transported her trick riding horse.

Amplifying the museum concept, the state-of-the-art Mattie Goff Newcombe Conference Center offers every amenity for special events, meetings, conventions and receptions. Available for day and evening events, the Center can accommodate over 400 in stand-up receptions; the Theatre can seat 275-300. The full catering kitchen is equipped with dishes, flatware and serving pieces, and the dining area will easily seat 200-plus in rounds. Stereo sound permeates the meeting space, which is equipped with ample power floor outlets to accommodate laptop use and VCR/ DVD presentations. Polycom conference phone, Fax and copier business services, and both handheld and lavaliere wireless microphones are available, while parking is almost unlimited.

This amazing venue, “where legends live on,” was officially opened last weekend, Aug. 14-16, attracting visitors from across the nation, as far away as Arkansas, Texas, and Indiana. Overflow crowds for the three-day blowout enjoyed a large vendor’s showcase, an ongoing program of varied Western entertainment, cowboy breakfast, beef & beans chuckwagon cookout, honoree/sponsor/donor reception, “hog wild” barbecue, “Born to Buck” Champion’s Dinner; bull riding competition, street dance, and the arrival and parade of the Fort Bennett to Fort Pierre “Casey Tibbs Memorial Ride” Wagon Train. Special traveling art exhibits by Mick Harrison, Mavis Madison, John Lopez, Kat Thompson and Tony Chytka beautified the museum and grounds for the big weekend.

All this is fruition of the dreams and vision of Mattie Goff Newcombe and Casey Tibbs, supported and brought to reality by innumerable generous people who donated money, time, talent and artifacts to enhance the collection. The Casey Tibbs Foundation (a 501©3 not-for-profit institution with the purpose and mission to preserve the heritage of rodeo and the western culture of South Dakota while promoting athletic and educational activities and opportunities for both the young people and adult citizens of South Dakota) was begun in 1989. It started as rodeo supporters, friends and family members visited with Casey during his last year of life, catching his vision for a facility that would pay tribute not only to his personal rodeo record but also to all South Dakota rodeo legends. A Foundation Tribute Dinner has been held annually since 1990, where deserving South Dakotan’s have been honored in five categories each year – Ranch Cowboy Family, Past Rodeo Great, Rodeo Promoter, Present Rodeo Cowgirl Great and Present Rodeo Cowboy Great. Two walls in the second story of the Center are covered with photos and information about those South Dakota heroes.

The Foundation’s hardworking Board of Directors currently includes President Dayle Tibbs Angyal; Vice President Pat Duffy; Secretary Jessie Tibbs Keckler; and Treasurer Bernie Duffy. Other board members include Bryan Hanson, Dick Herman, Gary Johnson, Betty Lou Kost, Diana Melvin, Johnny Smith, and Larry Tibbs.

South Dakota has produced 18 World Champion cowboys and cowgirls since records have been kept. They include 1927 Trick Riding Champion Mattie Goff Newcombe; 1929 All Around Cowboy and 1929 and ’31 Saddle Bronc Champ Earl Thode; 1946 Bull Riding Champion Pee Wee Morris; Casey Tibbs, Saddle Bronc Champion of 1949, 1951-1954 and 1959 as well as 1951 Bareback Champion and All Around Cowboy of 1951 and 1955. Then there’s Jack Buschbom, 1949, 1959 and 1960 Bareback Champion; Alvin Nelson, 1957 Saddle Bronc Champ; Paul Tierney, 1970 Tie-Down Roping Champion and 1980 All Around Cowboy; Clint Johnson who was Saddle Bronc Champion in 1980, 1987, 1988 and 1989; Ote Berry, Steer Wrestling Champ in 1985, 1990, ’91 and ’95; Bareback Champion for 1988, 1989, 1994 and 1995 Marvin Garrett; and Robert Etbauer, Saddle Bronc Champion in 1990 and 1991. In Tie Down Roping Troy Pruitt is honored for his 1990 Championship; Billy Etbauer held Saddle Bronc titles in 1992, 1996, 1999 and 2004; Mark Garrett, 1996 Bareback Champion; Frank Thompson, 2000 Steer Wrestling Champ; 2001 Saddle Bronc Champion Tom Reeves; Jeff Willert, who emulated his fellow Belvidere cowboy by picking up the world Saddle Bronc crown in 2005; and Chad Ferley, who earned the 2006 Saddle Bronc Championship. At least six of them were present for the opening of the Rodeo Center.

Veteran rodeo announcer and radio personality Jim Thompson, who launched his radio career in Pierre, was back in town to host the tribute discussion Friday evening the 14th when many cowboy and cowgirl voices showcased all facets of the man and the legend that was and is Casey Tibbs.

Monte James emceed the Saturday nite dinner, where The Company Cowboys entertained in impeccable style, sparking countless fond memories of the late Kyle Evans and his musical legacy to the West. Rodeo Center project manager Mike Damani, designers Split Rock Studios and Chris Johnson, researcher Kate Craven and workhorses Diana Melvin and Janice Bartels were recognized for their major contributions to the creation and growth of the Center.

Student assistant Ashley Worth commented that much of it had been accomplished with only three months work. Janice and Diana can’t quit enumerating the many who have been instrumental in enabling the project to come together, the ones they cannot find enough words to thank… the donors, sponsors, encouragers, people who have shared history and artifacts, photos, insight and suggestions… the multitudinous pieces that unite to make a masterpiece. The names Jim and Peg Aplan came up again and again as “we couldn’t have done it without them” stories were related.

Fantastic prime rib and all the trimmings were served to the overflow crowd by members of the Pierre-Fort Pierre Rodeo Club and the local Mothers of Pre-Schoolers (MOPS) group. Many rodeo champions from several eras were introduced and honored. The size of the crowd prevented this writer from having full information as to who all was there – but some attendees whose names you’d recognize include Jack Buschbom, Alvin Nelson, Duane Howard, Jerry Olson, Pete Fredericks, Duane Reichert, Paul Tierney, Ote Berry, Marvin Garrett, Bryan Fulton, Frank Thompson, Larry O’Neil, Mr. & Mrs. Lyle Etbauer (parents of the famed Etbauer boys), and Gayla Sue Purcell and Glenda Dawn Hester (daughters of the late Pee Wee Morris) who came all the way from Indiana.

Saturday evening a beautiful selection of valuable donated items – many of them handmade, many contributed by board members or their families – were vied for and bought in both silent and live bidding. Auctioneer Brian Hanson kept buyers pitted against one another, and the event accrued some $8,000 to help fund the Foundation’s continuing vision for the Rodeo Center.

That vision encompasses construction of a courtyard patio, archival storage area, and continuing historical projects. This writer, having visited many museums and halls of fame, is truly impressed by the quality of the Rodeo Center – the design, the continuity, the variety and the completeness of the story it tells, the history it portrays. It is truly one of the finest I have enjoyed; and everyone who has taken a hand in its development should be saluted.

To learn more, go to http://www.caseytibbs.com; or stop by the beautiful facilty on the banks of the wide Missouri. To comment or contribute, contact the Rodeo Center at Box 37, Fort Pierre, SD 57532, or info@caseytibbs.com.

The broad beautiful, deceptively lazy-looking Missouri River has witnessed more history in progress than most any other part of America. Transporting a rare breed of wild, adventuresome, freedom-seeking humanity, it developed into the big artery nurturing the heart of the infant West… symbol of the pioneer spirit that made men and women willing to board some type of watercraft at St. Louis and brave whatever unknown and unexpected danger each bend and turn might bring.

How fitting that a modern-day tribute to the unbridled spirit of the cowboy stands today on a shale bluff overlooking a breathtaking vista of that very river! And what a tribute it is – the Casey Tibbs South Dakota Rodeo Center & Mattie Goff-Newcombe Conference Center; a museum devoted exclusively to the cowboy sports spawned by the 1880’s cattle industry across the West, and the continuing influence that culture exerts on South Dakota.

Looming above its hometown of Fort Pierre, the unassuming exterior of the Center is completely deceptive. Only the brilliant purple rodeo silhouettes – depicting Mattie performing the Liberty stand and Casey spurring a big saddle bronc in his inimitable style – hint at the colorful explosion of history and culture to be found inside.

Visitors are greeted and welcomed by breathtaking, life sized Tony Chytka bronzes of Casey getting down in the chute on a bronc and Mattie trick riding on her favorite horse – fitting centerpieces for the ground floor rotunda. The theater/viewing room showcasing the history of South Dakota rodeo stirs visitors’ adrenaline and sends chills down their spines as they experience a crash course in the sport. Moving on from there they discover exhibits highlighting rodeo producers, announcers, clowns, specialty acts and queens; and data on 4-H, Little Britches, High School, Intercollegiate, Indian, Pro and Amateur rodeo associations. Big screens feature video productions by Steve Hall and Dave Hobson profiling the lives and accomplishments of South Dakota’s 18 World Champions. Younger guests flock to interactive Bronc Room and Dress-Up areas, where they’re free to make hands-on connections to any facets of rodeo that inspire them, including a simulated 8-second roughstock ride.

A dedicated Casey Tibbs segment houses the largest collection of historic memorabilia highlighting the many-times World Champion cowboy’s colorful childhood, rugged youth, meteoric rodeo career and lasting contributions to the sport.

Attractive and historically-accurate interpretative signs front the many sparkling enclosed cases scattered throughout both floors of the Center, each displaying priceless rodeo or pioneer memorabilia. Glass-topped display stands, in wagon wheel motif, contain championship buckles, photos and awards earned by the many honorees. Realistic murals morph into touchable reality as you come face to face with the homemade wooden horse trailer in which Mattie Goff transported her trick riding horse.

Amplifying the museum concept, the state-of-the-art Mattie Goff Newcombe Conference Center offers every amenity for special events, meetings, conventions and receptions. Available for day and evening events, the Center can accommodate over 400 in stand-up receptions; the Theatre can seat 275-300. The full catering kitchen is equipped with dishes, flatware and serving pieces, and the dining area will easily seat 200-plus in rounds. Stereo sound permeates the meeting space, which is equipped with ample power floor outlets to accommodate laptop use and VCR/ DVD presentations. Polycom conference phone, Fax and copier business services, and both handheld and lavaliere wireless microphones are available, while parking is almost unlimited.

This amazing venue, “where legends live on,” was officially opened last weekend, Aug. 14-16, attracting visitors from across the nation, as far away as Arkansas, Texas, and Indiana. Overflow crowds for the three-day blowout enjoyed a large vendor’s showcase, an ongoing program of varied Western entertainment, cowboy breakfast, beef & beans chuckwagon cookout, honoree/sponsor/donor reception, “hog wild” barbecue, “Born to Buck” Champion’s Dinner; bull riding competition, street dance, and the arrival and parade of the Fort Bennett to Fort Pierre “Casey Tibbs Memorial Ride” Wagon Train. Special traveling art exhibits by Mick Harrison, Mavis Madison, John Lopez, Kat Thompson and Tony Chytka beautified the museum and grounds for the big weekend.

All this is fruition of the dreams and vision of Mattie Goff Newcombe and Casey Tibbs, supported and brought to reality by innumerable generous people who donated money, time, talent and artifacts to enhance the collection. The Casey Tibbs Foundation (a 501©3 not-for-profit institution with the purpose and mission to preserve the heritage of rodeo and the western culture of South Dakota while promoting athletic and educational activities and opportunities for both the young people and adult citizens of South Dakota) was begun in 1989. It started as rodeo supporters, friends and family members visited with Casey during his last year of life, catching his vision for a facility that would pay tribute not only to his personal rodeo record but also to all South Dakota rodeo legends. A Foundation Tribute Dinner has been held annually since 1990, where deserving South Dakotan’s have been honored in five categories each year – Ranch Cowboy Family, Past Rodeo Great, Rodeo Promoter, Present Rodeo Cowgirl Great and Present Rodeo Cowboy Great. Two walls in the second story of the Center are covered with photos and information about those South Dakota heroes.

The Foundation’s hardworking Board of Directors currently includes President Dayle Tibbs Angyal; Vice President Pat Duffy; Secretary Jessie Tibbs Keckler; and Treasurer Bernie Duffy. Other board members include Bryan Hanson, Dick Herman, Gary Johnson, Betty Lou Kost, Diana Melvin, Johnny Smith, and Larry Tibbs.

South Dakota has produced 18 World Champion cowboys and cowgirls since records have been kept. They include 1927 Trick Riding Champion Mattie Goff Newcombe; 1929 All Around Cowboy and 1929 and ’31 Saddle Bronc Champ Earl Thode; 1946 Bull Riding Champion Pee Wee Morris; Casey Tibbs, Saddle Bronc Champion of 1949, 1951-1954 and 1959 as well as 1951 Bareback Champion and All Around Cowboy of 1951 and 1955. Then there’s Jack Buschbom, 1949, 1959 and 1960 Bareback Champion; Alvin Nelson, 1957 Saddle Bronc Champ; Paul Tierney, 1970 Tie-Down Roping Champion and 1980 All Around Cowboy; Clint Johnson who was Saddle Bronc Champion in 1980, 1987, 1988 and 1989; Ote Berry, Steer Wrestling Champ in 1985, 1990, ’91 and ’95; Bareback Champion for 1988, 1989, 1994 and 1995 Marvin Garrett; and Robert Etbauer, Saddle Bronc Champion in 1990 and 1991. In Tie Down Roping Troy Pruitt is honored for his 1990 Championship; Billy Etbauer held Saddle Bronc titles in 1992, 1996, 1999 and 2004; Mark Garrett, 1996 Bareback Champion; Frank Thompson, 2000 Steer Wrestling Champ; 2001 Saddle Bronc Champion Tom Reeves; Jeff Willert, who emulated his fellow Belvidere cowboy by picking up the world Saddle Bronc crown in 2005; and Chad Ferley, who earned the 2006 Saddle Bronc Championship. At least six of them were present for the opening of the Rodeo Center.

Veteran rodeo announcer and radio personality Jim Thompson, who launched his radio career in Pierre, was back in town to host the tribute discussion Friday evening the 14th when many cowboy and cowgirl voices showcased all facets of the man and the legend that was and is Casey Tibbs.

Monte James emceed the Saturday nite dinner, where The Company Cowboys entertained in impeccable style, sparking countless fond memories of the late Kyle Evans and his musical legacy to the West. Rodeo Center project manager Mike Damani, designers Split Rock Studios and Chris Johnson, researcher Kate Craven and workhorses Diana Melvin and Janice Bartels were recognized for their major contributions to the creation and growth of the Center.

Student assistant Ashley Worth commented that much of it had been accomplished with only three months work. Janice and Diana can’t quit enumerating the many who have been instrumental in enabling the project to come together, the ones they cannot find enough words to thank… the donors, sponsors, encouragers, people who have shared history and artifacts, photos, insight and suggestions… the multitudinous pieces that unite to make a masterpiece. The names Jim and Peg Aplan came up again and again as “we couldn’t have done it without them” stories were related.

Fantastic prime rib and all the trimmings were served to the overflow crowd by members of the Pierre-Fort Pierre Rodeo Club and the local Mothers of Pre-Schoolers (MOPS) group. Many rodeo champions from several eras were introduced and honored. The size of the crowd prevented this writer from having full information as to who all was there – but some attendees whose names you’d recognize include Jack Buschbom, Alvin Nelson, Duane Howard, Jerry Olson, Pete Fredericks, Duane Reichert, Paul Tierney, Ote Berry, Marvin Garrett, Bryan Fulton, Frank Thompson, Larry O’Neil, Mr. & Mrs. Lyle Etbauer (parents of the famed Etbauer boys), and Gayla Sue Purcell and Glenda Dawn Hester (daughters of the late Pee Wee Morris) who came all the way from Indiana.

Saturday evening a beautiful selection of valuable donated items – many of them handmade, many contributed by board members or their families – were vied for and bought in both silent and live bidding. Auctioneer Brian Hanson kept buyers pitted against one another, and the event accrued some $8,000 to help fund the Foundation’s continuing vision for the Rodeo Center.

That vision encompasses construction of a courtyard patio, archival storage area, and continuing historical projects. This writer, having visited many museums and halls of fame, is truly impressed by the quality of the Rodeo Center – the design, the continuity, the variety and the completeness of the story it tells, the history it portrays. It is truly one of the finest I have enjoyed; and everyone who has taken a hand in its development should be saluted.

To learn more, go to http://www.caseytibbs.com; or stop by the beautiful facilty on the banks of the wide Missouri. To comment or contribute, contact the Rodeo Center at Box 37, Fort Pierre, SD 57532, or info@caseytibbs.com.