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Rodeo world turns to the College National Finals

The attention of the rodeo world is turning to the College National Finals Rodeo (CNFR) this week when more than 400 cowboys and cowgirls from the 11 regions of the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association (NIRA) compete at the Casper Events Center.

This premier event runs from June 13-19, with the who’s who of the rodeo world on hand to watch the up and coming future stars of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association in action.

“The CNFR represents the cream of the crop of our student athletes,” NIRA Commissioner Roger Walters said. “The top three students in each event and the top two men’s and women’s teams for the 11 regions are represented here at the Events Center during this ‘Rose Bowl’ at the college level.”



Under the rules, each member school can have a team competing even if there is only one contestant from that school. The individual points count towards team titles. There will be close to 150 member schools represented as well.

Each contestant has three preliminary rounds of competition prior to the final round on Saturday night, June 19. Scores and times from those three rounds will be added up and the 12 contestants with the fastest total times or highest total scores will advance to the finals. In addition, several special awards will be presented throughout the competition. Complete results will be available at http://www.cnfr.com.



Walters said Harry Vold, the well-known stock contractor of record from Southern Colorado, has added a number of sub-contractors to assure the depth of rough stock and timed-event livestock required to provide the quality of animals needed for the roster of high caliber contestants at the finals.

Jim Dewey Brown, the arena director, said the sub-contractors include stock from the Hal Burns Rodeo Company, Southwick Rodeo Company, Sutton Rodeo Company, Frontier Rodeo Company, Hyland Cattle Company, Broken Arrow Rodeo, James Real Bird and the Triple V from Casper.

When the championship performance is finished on June 19, individual event champions in saddle bronc riding, bareback riding, bull riding, tie-down roping, steer wrestling, team roping, barrel racing, breakaway roping and goat tying will be crowned along with the men’s and women’s team championships.

The star-studded roster of collegiate contestants arrived on June 12 for check-in and competitor meetings.

The actual competition began on Sunday, June 13, with the popular “Bulls, Broncs and Breakaway” matinee and evening performances. Action continues on Monday, June 14 with the slack starting at 7 a.m.

The first performance, and Walt Garrison Award presentation, begins at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, June 15. The second performance and “Coach of the Year” program gets underway at 7 p.m. on June 16.

Performances hold the spotlight at 7 p.m. on June 17 and June 18 with the sellout championship and fifth performance and awards program beginning at 7 p.m. on June 19 as the finale.

Although the prime focus is in the arena for the performances, there are a number of other activities scheduled to add excitement to this prime event in Casper.

On Saturday, June 12, the Stephanie Quayle & Savannah Jack concert takes place at the fairgrounds for a change of pace. Quayle is a western singer with her roots in Bozeman, MT, who is rapidly gaining popularity around the country.

Other major activities planned on Saturday, June 19 include the Special Olympics from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at the events center. Sixty to 100 students serve as hosts and help the contestants.

The Foundation Style Show at the Parkway Plaza begins at 11:30 a.m. During the style show, the audience is entertained by the Wrangler All Star Contestants from the Ozark Region displaying clothing donated by Wrangler. The emphasis, however, is focused on generating funds for the foundation to support activities that include the Injured Athlete Relief Fund, the Historical Preservation Fund, the Scholarship Fund and the Rawhide Fund.

To move the dirt in and prepare the events center, Walters said it takes a small army of volunteers and city workers to turn the center into a livestock facility. The CNFR is being advertised throughout the region and is recognized as a major event in equine and rodeo publications, Walters said.

The attention of the rodeo world is turning to the College National Finals Rodeo (CNFR) this week when more than 400 cowboys and cowgirls from the 11 regions of the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association (NIRA) compete at the Casper Events Center.

This premier event runs from June 13-19, with the who’s who of the rodeo world on hand to watch the up and coming future stars of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association in action.

“The CNFR represents the cream of the crop of our student athletes,” NIRA Commissioner Roger Walters said. “The top three students in each event and the top two men’s and women’s teams for the 11 regions are represented here at the Events Center during this ‘Rose Bowl’ at the college level.”

Under the rules, each member school can have a team competing even if there is only one contestant from that school. The individual points count towards team titles. There will be close to 150 member schools represented as well.

Each contestant has three preliminary rounds of competition prior to the final round on Saturday night, June 19. Scores and times from those three rounds will be added up and the 12 contestants with the fastest total times or highest total scores will advance to the finals. In addition, several special awards will be presented throughout the competition. Complete results will be available at http://www.cnfr.com.

Walters said Harry Vold, the well-known stock contractor of record from Southern Colorado, has added a number of sub-contractors to assure the depth of rough stock and timed-event livestock required to provide the quality of animals needed for the roster of high caliber contestants at the finals.

Jim Dewey Brown, the arena director, said the sub-contractors include stock from the Hal Burns Rodeo Company, Southwick Rodeo Company, Sutton Rodeo Company, Frontier Rodeo Company, Hyland Cattle Company, Broken Arrow Rodeo, James Real Bird and the Triple V from Casper.

When the championship performance is finished on June 19, individual event champions in saddle bronc riding, bareback riding, bull riding, tie-down roping, steer wrestling, team roping, barrel racing, breakaway roping and goat tying will be crowned along with the men’s and women’s team championships.

The star-studded roster of collegiate contestants arrived on June 12 for check-in and competitor meetings.

The actual competition began on Sunday, June 13, with the popular “Bulls, Broncs and Breakaway” matinee and evening performances. Action continues on Monday, June 14 with the slack starting at 7 a.m.

The first performance, and Walt Garrison Award presentation, begins at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, June 15. The second performance and “Coach of the Year” program gets underway at 7 p.m. on June 16.

Performances hold the spotlight at 7 p.m. on June 17 and June 18 with the sellout championship and fifth performance and awards program beginning at 7 p.m. on June 19 as the finale.

Although the prime focus is in the arena for the performances, there are a number of other activities scheduled to add excitement to this prime event in Casper.

On Saturday, June 12, the Stephanie Quayle & Savannah Jack concert takes place at the fairgrounds for a change of pace. Quayle is a western singer with her roots in Bozeman, MT, who is rapidly gaining popularity around the country.

Other major activities planned on Saturday, June 19 include the Special Olympics from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at the events center. Sixty to 100 students serve as hosts and help the contestants.

The Foundation Style Show at the Parkway Plaza begins at 11:30 a.m. During the style show, the audience is entertained by the Wrangler All Star Contestants from the Ozark Region displaying clothing donated by Wrangler. The emphasis, however, is focused on generating funds for the foundation to support activities that include the Injured Athlete Relief Fund, the Historical Preservation Fund, the Scholarship Fund and the Rawhide Fund.

To move the dirt in and prepare the events center, Walters said it takes a small army of volunteers and city workers to turn the center into a livestock facility. The CNFR is being advertised throughout the region and is recognized as a major event in equine and rodeo publications, Walters said.


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