Rural Women in Ag Conference discusses diverse issues | TSLN.com

Rural Women in Ag Conference discusses diverse issues

Melissa Burke

Approximately 50 women from South Dakota and surrounding states were in attendance at the sixth annual Rural Women in Ag Conference, held Sept. 26-27 at the Holiday Inn Convention Center in Spearfish, SD. The event was made possible through the Rural Women Conference Committee, which consisted of several County Extension Office employees plus a number of volunteers. Over a dozen additional sponsors helped contribute to the program.

The keynote speaker on Friday morning was Matt DeMarco of the American Farm Bureau. In this workshop, called “He Said, She Said: Exploring How Men and Women Communicate,” DeMarco examined the research of Dr. Deborah Tannen, author and professor of linguistics at Georgetown University.

According to Dr. Tannen, conversational gender differences begin in early childhood and continue through adulthood. This can affect productivity in the workplace.

DeMarco compared the behavior of boys and girls as they interact. He indicated that boys tend to play more frequently in groups, and generally with other boys. They also tend to be more competitive with each other, whether it be on the playground or in conversation, such as comparing what their fathers do at work. Girls, on the other hand, try to connect by finding a common experience.

Approximately 50 women from South Dakota and surrounding states were in attendance at the sixth annual Rural Women in Ag Conference, held Sept. 26-27 at the Holiday Inn Convention Center in Spearfish, SD. The event was made possible through the Rural Women Conference Committee, which consisted of several County Extension Office employees plus a number of volunteers. Over a dozen additional sponsors helped contribute to the program.

The keynote speaker on Friday morning was Matt DeMarco of the American Farm Bureau. In this workshop, called “He Said, She Said: Exploring How Men and Women Communicate,” DeMarco examined the research of Dr. Deborah Tannen, author and professor of linguistics at Georgetown University.

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According to Dr. Tannen, conversational gender differences begin in early childhood and continue through adulthood. This can affect productivity in the workplace.

DeMarco compared the behavior of boys and girls as they interact. He indicated that boys tend to play more frequently in groups, and generally with other boys. They also tend to be more competitive with each other, whether it be on the playground or in conversation, such as comparing what their fathers do at work. Girls, on the other hand, try to connect by finding a common experience.

Approximately 50 women from South Dakota and surrounding states were in attendance at the sixth annual Rural Women in Ag Conference, held Sept. 26-27 at the Holiday Inn Convention Center in Spearfish, SD. The event was made possible through the Rural Women Conference Committee, which consisted of several County Extension Office employees plus a number of volunteers. Over a dozen additional sponsors helped contribute to the program.

The keynote speaker on Friday morning was Matt DeMarco of the American Farm Bureau. In this workshop, called “He Said, She Said: Exploring How Men and Women Communicate,” DeMarco examined the research of Dr. Deborah Tannen, author and professor of linguistics at Georgetown University.

According to Dr. Tannen, conversational gender differences begin in early childhood and continue through adulthood. This can affect productivity in the workplace.

DeMarco compared the behavior of boys and girls as they interact. He indicated that boys tend to play more frequently in groups, and generally with other boys. They also tend to be more competitive with each other, whether it be on the playground or in conversation, such as comparing what their fathers do at work. Girls, on the other hand, try to connect by finding a common experience.