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Ryan Goodman launches ‘Agriculture Proud’ Web site to showcase lifestyle

“Agriculture, it’s more than part of life; It’s a passion, a lifestyle, a resilient community working together to feed the world,” opined Ryan Goodman on his Web site, agricultureproud.com.

Goodman hails from Prattsville, AR, where he works on a 1,500-head cow-calf operation. He is an animal science graduate from Oklahoma State University, and his passion is sharing the agriculture story and his personal experiences in the cattle business.

That’s why Goodman started Agriculture Proud, a Web site that reaches more than 3,000 people each month and focuses on the modern pioneers who work hard each day to feed the world. So, what does it mean to be agriculture proud?

“Being Agriculture Proud is simply telling your story,” explained Goodman. “Why are you proud to be a part of agriculture? Are you passionate about your job? If so, you should find no problem sharing this story with others.”

How is this done? Goodman offered five pieces of advice to effectively sharing the agriculture proud message with today’s consumers.

“First, be real and authentic about your passion for agriculture,” advised Goodman. “Second, show the enthusiasm for your passion. Third, keep it simple and to the point. Fourth, make it a candid point of view; everything in life is not flowers and sunshine. Fifth, stick to your experience; you can’t defend everyone.”

With these sound pieces of advice, Goodman practices what he preaches. His blog shares his personal ranch stories, an abundance of explanatory photo blogs, recipe contests, producer spotlights and educational resources for those curious about where their food comes from to check out.

And, one of Goodman’s newest adventures on Agriculture Proud is called, “Stamps, States and AgFacts,” which takes his goals one step further.

“To combine my love for collecting postcards with my passion of learning about agriculture, I set a goal in 2011 to collect postcards from all 50 states and beyond and learn something about agriculture unique to each area,” said Goodman. “I ask readers to send a postcard from their state and include an agriculture fact on the back.”

This idea came to Goodman when he was putting up hay one afternoon, and so far, he has had a great response from across the country.

“I have received 94 cards from 26 different states so far,” said Goodman. “I’m a little over the half-way mark, and I just started this in February. I was excited to receive a card from Hawaii; I’m hoping Alaska is next! Kansas has sent me 24 cards already. Basically, I’m using this project as a motivation to get agriculture folks to polish up their state agriculture facts with the hope that they will share those messages with others. I’ve tried to engage consumers in this, and it’s working. I have received consumer postcards from Chicago, New York City and Atlanta.”

Goodman doesn’t just use his Web site as a channel to share his message. His Facebook group is called, “I am Agriculture Proud.” His Twitter tag is #AgProud, and he maintains an “AgProud” YouTube channel, as well.

“Ever since I have been back to the ranch, I have been posting cattle 101 stuff, with twitter updates using the hashtag, #ranchlife,” said Goodman. “I hope to educate consumers about basic things like vaccinations, spring working, hay production and feeding.”

Agriculture Proud was started on accident one day with an open-ended question Goodman posted on Facebook: “Why are you proud to be in agriculture?” This question has been answered countless times since Goodman has launched it as a national sounding board for consumer and producer conversations, and he has received countless media interviews as a result of his efforts.

“I’m trying to be better at explaining the basics of ranching and putting a little education to my posts,” added Goodman. “My best advice for others is to just have fun with it. If you set out with a plan, and you mess up, it’s easy to get frustrated. Just look for new opportunities to have a conversation. For me, it’s worked out. Be social about it. I don’t have a smart phone, but I use text messaging to update my online accounts. You don’t have to have the best technology to be effective.”

While focusing on his online conversations, Goodman still manages to work on the ranch, and his biggest goal is to improve his own cowherd as time progresses. At the end of the day, whether a producer is raising grapes for wine or cattle for beef, all farmers and ranchers are agriculture proud.

“I am agriculture proud because I get to work on a daily basis doing what I love most – working with and raising cattle,” concluded Goodman. “I get the opportunity to work side-by-side with my family. I get to work everyday to feed people. And, that’s the best part.”

“Agriculture, it’s more than part of life; It’s a passion, a lifestyle, a resilient community working together to feed the world,” opined Ryan Goodman on his Web site, agricultureproud.com.

Goodman hails from Prattsville, AR, where he works on a 1,500-head cow-calf operation. He is an animal science graduate from Oklahoma State University, and his passion is sharing the agriculture story and his personal experiences in the cattle business.

That’s why Goodman started Agriculture Proud, a Web site that reaches more than 3,000 people each month and focuses on the modern pioneers who work hard each day to feed the world. So, what does it mean to be agriculture proud?

“Being Agriculture Proud is simply telling your story,” explained Goodman. “Why are you proud to be a part of agriculture? Are you passionate about your job? If so, you should find no problem sharing this story with others.”

How is this done? Goodman offered five pieces of advice to effectively sharing the agriculture proud message with today’s consumers.

“First, be real and authentic about your passion for agriculture,” advised Goodman. “Second, show the enthusiasm for your passion. Third, keep it simple and to the point. Fourth, make it a candid point of view; everything in life is not flowers and sunshine. Fifth, stick to your experience; you can’t defend everyone.”

With these sound pieces of advice, Goodman practices what he preaches. His blog shares his personal ranch stories, an abundance of explanatory photo blogs, recipe contests, producer spotlights and educational resources for those curious about where their food comes from to check out.

And, one of Goodman’s newest adventures on Agriculture Proud is called, “Stamps, States and AgFacts,” which takes his goals one step further.

“To combine my love for collecting postcards with my passion of learning about agriculture, I set a goal in 2011 to collect postcards from all 50 states and beyond and learn something about agriculture unique to each area,” said Goodman. “I ask readers to send a postcard from their state and include an agriculture fact on the back.”

This idea came to Goodman when he was putting up hay one afternoon, and so far, he has had a great response from across the country.

“I have received 94 cards from 26 different states so far,” said Goodman. “I’m a little over the half-way mark, and I just started this in February. I was excited to receive a card from Hawaii; I’m hoping Alaska is next! Kansas has sent me 24 cards already. Basically, I’m using this project as a motivation to get agriculture folks to polish up their state agriculture facts with the hope that they will share those messages with others. I’ve tried to engage consumers in this, and it’s working. I have received consumer postcards from Chicago, New York City and Atlanta.”

Goodman doesn’t just use his Web site as a channel to share his message. His Facebook group is called, “I am Agriculture Proud.” His Twitter tag is #AgProud, and he maintains an “AgProud” YouTube channel, as well.

“Ever since I have been back to the ranch, I have been posting cattle 101 stuff, with twitter updates using the hashtag, #ranchlife,” said Goodman. “I hope to educate consumers about basic things like vaccinations, spring working, hay production and feeding.”

Agriculture Proud was started on accident one day with an open-ended question Goodman posted on Facebook: “Why are you proud to be in agriculture?” This question has been answered countless times since Goodman has launched it as a national sounding board for consumer and producer conversations, and he has received countless media interviews as a result of his efforts.

“I’m trying to be better at explaining the basics of ranching and putting a little education to my posts,” added Goodman. “My best advice for others is to just have fun with it. If you set out with a plan, and you mess up, it’s easy to get frustrated. Just look for new opportunities to have a conversation. For me, it’s worked out. Be social about it. I don’t have a smart phone, but I use text messaging to update my online accounts. You don’t have to have the best technology to be effective.”

While focusing on his online conversations, Goodman still manages to work on the ranch, and his biggest goal is to improve his own cowherd as time progresses. At the end of the day, whether a producer is raising grapes for wine or cattle for beef, all farmers and ranchers are agriculture proud.

“I am agriculture proud because I get to work on a daily basis doing what I love most – working with and raising cattle,” concluded Goodman. “I get the opportunity to work side-by-side with my family. I get to work everyday to feed people. And, that’s the best part.”

“Agriculture, it’s more than part of life; It’s a passion, a lifestyle, a resilient community working together to feed the world,” opined Ryan Goodman on his Web site, agricultureproud.com.

Goodman hails from Prattsville, AR, where he works on a 1,500-head cow-calf operation. He is an animal science graduate from Oklahoma State University, and his passion is sharing the agriculture story and his personal experiences in the cattle business.

That’s why Goodman started Agriculture Proud, a Web site that reaches more than 3,000 people each month and focuses on the modern pioneers who work hard each day to feed the world. So, what does it mean to be agriculture proud?

“Being Agriculture Proud is simply telling your story,” explained Goodman. “Why are you proud to be a part of agriculture? Are you passionate about your job? If so, you should find no problem sharing this story with others.”

How is this done? Goodman offered five pieces of advice to effectively sharing the agriculture proud message with today’s consumers.

“First, be real and authentic about your passion for agriculture,” advised Goodman. “Second, show the enthusiasm for your passion. Third, keep it simple and to the point. Fourth, make it a candid point of view; everything in life is not flowers and sunshine. Fifth, stick to your experience; you can’t defend everyone.”

With these sound pieces of advice, Goodman practices what he preaches. His blog shares his personal ranch stories, an abundance of explanatory photo blogs, recipe contests, producer spotlights and educational resources for those curious about where their food comes from to check out.

And, one of Goodman’s newest adventures on Agriculture Proud is called, “Stamps, States and AgFacts,” which takes his goals one step further.

“To combine my love for collecting postcards with my passion of learning about agriculture, I set a goal in 2011 to collect postcards from all 50 states and beyond and learn something about agriculture unique to each area,” said Goodman. “I ask readers to send a postcard from their state and include an agriculture fact on the back.”

This idea came to Goodman when he was putting up hay one afternoon, and so far, he has had a great response from across the country.

“I have received 94 cards from 26 different states so far,” said Goodman. “I’m a little over the half-way mark, and I just started this in February. I was excited to receive a card from Hawaii; I’m hoping Alaska is next! Kansas has sent me 24 cards already. Basically, I’m using this project as a motivation to get agriculture folks to polish up their state agriculture facts with the hope that they will share those messages with others. I’ve tried to engage consumers in this, and it’s working. I have received consumer postcards from Chicago, New York City and Atlanta.”

Goodman doesn’t just use his Web site as a channel to share his message. His Facebook group is called, “I am Agriculture Proud.” His Twitter tag is #AgProud, and he maintains an “AgProud” YouTube channel, as well.

“Ever since I have been back to the ranch, I have been posting cattle 101 stuff, with twitter updates using the hashtag, #ranchlife,” said Goodman. “I hope to educate consumers about basic things like vaccinations, spring working, hay production and feeding.”

Agriculture Proud was started on accident one day with an open-ended question Goodman posted on Facebook: “Why are you proud to be in agriculture?” This question has been answered countless times since Goodman has launched it as a national sounding board for consumer and producer conversations, and he has received countless media interviews as a result of his efforts.

“I’m trying to be better at explaining the basics of ranching and putting a little education to my posts,” added Goodman. “My best advice for others is to just have fun with it. If you set out with a plan, and you mess up, it’s easy to get frustrated. Just look for new opportunities to have a conversation. For me, it’s worked out. Be social about it. I don’t have a smart phone, but I use text messaging to update my online accounts. You don’t have to have the best technology to be effective.”

While focusing on his online conversations, Goodman still manages to work on the ranch, and his biggest goal is to improve his own cowherd as time progresses. At the end of the day, whether a producer is raising grapes for wine or cattle for beef, all farmers and ranchers are agriculture proud.

“I am agriculture proud because I get to work on a daily basis doing what I love most – working with and raising cattle,” concluded Goodman. “I get the opportunity to work side-by-side with my family. I get to work everyday to feed people. And, that’s the best part.”

“Agriculture, it’s more than part of life; It’s a passion, a lifestyle, a resilient community working together to feed the world,” opined Ryan Goodman on his Web site, agricultureproud.com.

Goodman hails from Prattsville, AR, where he works on a 1,500-head cow-calf operation. He is an animal science graduate from Oklahoma State University, and his passion is sharing the agriculture story and his personal experiences in the cattle business.

That’s why Goodman started Agriculture Proud, a Web site that reaches more than 3,000 people each month and focuses on the modern pioneers who work hard each day to feed the world. So, what does it mean to be agriculture proud?

“Being Agriculture Proud is simply telling your story,” explained Goodman. “Why are you proud to be a part of agriculture? Are you passionate about your job? If so, you should find no problem sharing this story with others.”

How is this done? Goodman offered five pieces of advice to effectively sharing the agriculture proud message with today’s consumers.

“First, be real and authentic about your passion for agriculture,” advised Goodman. “Second, show the enthusiasm for your passion. Third, keep it simple and to the point. Fourth, make it a candid point of view; everything in life is not flowers and sunshine. Fifth, stick to your experience; you can’t defend everyone.”

With these sound pieces of advice, Goodman practices what he preaches. His blog shares his personal ranch stories, an abundance of explanatory photo blogs, recipe contests, producer spotlights and educational resources for those curious about where their food comes from to check out.

And, one of Goodman’s newest adventures on Agriculture Proud is called, “Stamps, States and AgFacts,” which takes his goals one step further.

“To combine my love for collecting postcards with my passion of learning about agriculture, I set a goal in 2011 to collect postcards from all 50 states and beyond and learn something about agriculture unique to each area,” said Goodman. “I ask readers to send a postcard from their state and include an agriculture fact on the back.”

This idea came to Goodman when he was putting up hay one afternoon, and so far, he has had a great response from across the country.

“I have received 94 cards from 26 different states so far,” said Goodman. “I’m a little over the half-way mark, and I just started this in February. I was excited to receive a card from Hawaii; I’m hoping Alaska is next! Kansas has sent me 24 cards already. Basically, I’m using this project as a motivation to get agriculture folks to polish up their state agriculture facts with the hope that they will share those messages with others. I’ve tried to engage consumers in this, and it’s working. I have received consumer postcards from Chicago, New York City and Atlanta.”

Goodman doesn’t just use his Web site as a channel to share his message. His Facebook group is called, “I am Agriculture Proud.” His Twitter tag is #AgProud, and he maintains an “AgProud” YouTube channel, as well.

“Ever since I have been back to the ranch, I have been posting cattle 101 stuff, with twitter updates using the hashtag, #ranchlife,” said Goodman. “I hope to educate consumers about basic things like vaccinations, spring working, hay production and feeding.”

Agriculture Proud was started on accident one day with an open-ended question Goodman posted on Facebook: “Why are you proud to be in agriculture?” This question has been answered countless times since Goodman has launched it as a national sounding board for consumer and producer conversations, and he has received countless media interviews as a result of his efforts.

“I’m trying to be better at explaining the basics of ranching and putting a little education to my posts,” added Goodman. “My best advice for others is to just have fun with it. If you set out with a plan, and you mess up, it’s easy to get frustrated. Just look for new opportunities to have a conversation. For me, it’s worked out. Be social about it. I don’t have a smart phone, but I use text messaging to update my online accounts. You don’t have to have the best technology to be effective.”

While focusing on his online conversations, Goodman still manages to work on the ranch, and his biggest goal is to improve his own cowherd as time progresses. At the end of the day, whether a producer is raising grapes for wine or cattle for beef, all farmers and ranchers are agriculture proud.

“I am agriculture proud because I get to work on a daily basis doing what I love most – working with and raising cattle,” concluded Goodman. “I get the opportunity to work side-by-side with my family. I get to work everyday to feed people. And, that’s the best part.”


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