Schaefer Family Chiangus Cattle | TSLN.com

Schaefer Family Chiangus Cattle

All photos courtesy Schaefer ChiangusThe Schaefer family farm near Des Lacs, ND.

The Schaefer family, ranching near the small town of Des Lacs, ND, got started with Chianina cattle more than 35 years ago. Theirs is a family operation, involving Jerry and Jean Schaefer and their sons.

“We are probably one of the few Chiangus breeders in this country who keep a fairly high percentage of Chi in our Chiangus genetics,” says Jerry. “Our set of bulls this year, for instance, runs just under 30 percent Chianina, on average. That’s not the norm, but we have found that our commercial people and purebred clients want a little higher percentage of Chianina in the mix. Then they can take those genetics and use them to their advantage by either continuing that percentage or breeding them down or up.”

Commercial customers tend to like a little bit more Chianina in the cattle, to get more kick from the hybrid vigor.

“They get a little bit more growth in those cattle,” says Jerry. “The Chiangus genetics have definitely evolved into a great beef breed. In the earlier years, when Chianina were first brought to this country, the fullblood cattle were really big framed, and that whole concept has changed tremendously now with the Chiangus and Chimaine programs that have been built off those genetics in recent years. People have the thought when they hear the word Chi that these are big, tall, lanky cattle, but they are really not, anymore.”

The breed mixes complement one another.

“We’ve drawn greatly from Angus genetics, over the years,” says Jerry. “We are proud of the bloodlines we have used, and the different bulls that have brought different genetics into our program. As our program has evolved, we’ve found that our genetics are becoming more multi-generation than they were in the past. Over half our bulls in the production sale this year will be PCA (purebred Chiangus) and some are multi-generation PCA already. That’s something our program can add to other people’s breeding programs; they can benefit from several generations of stacked Chiangus genetics. This has become a uniform composite.

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The Schaefer family, ranching near the small town of Des Lacs, ND, got started with Chianina cattle more than 35 years ago. Theirs is a family operation, involving Jerry and Jean Schaefer and their sons.

“We are probably one of the few Chiangus breeders in this country who keep a fairly high percentage of Chi in our Chiangus genetics,” says Jerry. “Our set of bulls this year, for instance, runs just under 30 percent Chianina, on average. That’s not the norm, but we have found that our commercial people and purebred clients want a little higher percentage of Chianina in the mix. Then they can take those genetics and use them to their advantage by either continuing that percentage or breeding them down or up.”

Commercial customers tend to like a little bit more Chianina in the cattle, to get more kick from the hybrid vigor.

“They get a little bit more growth in those cattle,” says Jerry. “The Chiangus genetics have definitely evolved into a great beef breed. In the earlier years, when Chianina were first brought to this country, the fullblood cattle were really big framed, and that whole concept has changed tremendously now with the Chiangus and Chimaine programs that have been built off those genetics in recent years. People have the thought when they hear the word Chi that these are big, tall, lanky cattle, but they are really not, anymore.”

The breed mixes complement one another.

“We’ve drawn greatly from Angus genetics, over the years,” says Jerry. “We are proud of the bloodlines we have used, and the different bulls that have brought different genetics into our program. As our program has evolved, we’ve found that our genetics are becoming more multi-generation than they were in the past. Over half our bulls in the production sale this year will be PCA (purebred Chiangus) and some are multi-generation PCA already. That’s something our program can add to other people’s breeding programs; they can benefit from several generations of stacked Chiangus genetics. This has become a uniform composite.

The Schaefer family, ranching near the small town of Des Lacs, ND, got started with Chianina cattle more than 35 years ago. Theirs is a family operation, involving Jerry and Jean Schaefer and their sons.

“We are probably one of the few Chiangus breeders in this country who keep a fairly high percentage of Chi in our Chiangus genetics,” says Jerry. “Our set of bulls this year, for instance, runs just under 30 percent Chianina, on average. That’s not the norm, but we have found that our commercial people and purebred clients want a little higher percentage of Chianina in the mix. Then they can take those genetics and use them to their advantage by either continuing that percentage or breeding them down or up.”

Commercial customers tend to like a little bit more Chianina in the cattle, to get more kick from the hybrid vigor.

“They get a little bit more growth in those cattle,” says Jerry. “The Chiangus genetics have definitely evolved into a great beef breed. In the earlier years, when Chianina were first brought to this country, the fullblood cattle were really big framed, and that whole concept has changed tremendously now with the Chiangus and Chimaine programs that have been built off those genetics in recent years. People have the thought when they hear the word Chi that these are big, tall, lanky cattle, but they are really not, anymore.”

The breed mixes complement one another.

“We’ve drawn greatly from Angus genetics, over the years,” says Jerry. “We are proud of the bloodlines we have used, and the different bulls that have brought different genetics into our program. As our program has evolved, we’ve found that our genetics are becoming more multi-generation than they were in the past. Over half our bulls in the production sale this year will be PCA (purebred Chiangus) and some are multi-generation PCA already. That’s something our program can add to other people’s breeding programs; they can benefit from several generations of stacked Chiangus genetics. This has become a uniform composite.

The Schaefer family, ranching near the small town of Des Lacs, ND, got started with Chianina cattle more than 35 years ago. Theirs is a family operation, involving Jerry and Jean Schaefer and their sons.

“We are probably one of the few Chiangus breeders in this country who keep a fairly high percentage of Chi in our Chiangus genetics,” says Jerry. “Our set of bulls this year, for instance, runs just under 30 percent Chianina, on average. That’s not the norm, but we have found that our commercial people and purebred clients want a little higher percentage of Chianina in the mix. Then they can take those genetics and use them to their advantage by either continuing that percentage or breeding them down or up.”

Commercial customers tend to like a little bit more Chianina in the cattle, to get more kick from the hybrid vigor.

“They get a little bit more growth in those cattle,” says Jerry. “The Chiangus genetics have definitely evolved into a great beef breed. In the earlier years, when Chianina were first brought to this country, the fullblood cattle were really big framed, and that whole concept has changed tremendously now with the Chiangus and Chimaine programs that have been built off those genetics in recent years. People have the thought when they hear the word Chi that these are big, tall, lanky cattle, but they are really not, anymore.”

The breed mixes complement one another.

“We’ve drawn greatly from Angus genetics, over the years,” says Jerry. “We are proud of the bloodlines we have used, and the different bulls that have brought different genetics into our program. As our program has evolved, we’ve found that our genetics are becoming more multi-generation than they were in the past. Over half our bulls in the production sale this year will be PCA (purebred Chiangus) and some are multi-generation PCA already. That’s something our program can add to other people’s breeding programs; they can benefit from several generations of stacked Chiangus genetics. This has become a uniform composite.

The Schaefer family, ranching near the small town of Des Lacs, ND, got started with Chianina cattle more than 35 years ago. Theirs is a family operation, involving Jerry and Jean Schaefer and their sons.

“We are probably one of the few Chiangus breeders in this country who keep a fairly high percentage of Chi in our Chiangus genetics,” says Jerry. “Our set of bulls this year, for instance, runs just under 30 percent Chianina, on average. That’s not the norm, but we have found that our commercial people and purebred clients want a little higher percentage of Chianina in the mix. Then they can take those genetics and use them to their advantage by either continuing that percentage or breeding them down or up.”

Commercial customers tend to like a little bit more Chianina in the cattle, to get more kick from the hybrid vigor.

“They get a little bit more growth in those cattle,” says Jerry. “The Chiangus genetics have definitely evolved into a great beef breed. In the earlier years, when Chianina were first brought to this country, the fullblood cattle were really big framed, and that whole concept has changed tremendously now with the Chiangus and Chimaine programs that have been built off those genetics in recent years. People have the thought when they hear the word Chi that these are big, tall, lanky cattle, but they are really not, anymore.”

The breed mixes complement one another.

“We’ve drawn greatly from Angus genetics, over the years,” says Jerry. “We are proud of the bloodlines we have used, and the different bulls that have brought different genetics into our program. As our program has evolved, we’ve found that our genetics are becoming more multi-generation than they were in the past. Over half our bulls in the production sale this year will be PCA (purebred Chiangus) and some are multi-generation PCA already. That’s something our program can add to other people’s breeding programs; they can benefit from several generations of stacked Chiangus genetics. This has become a uniform composite.