Schlagel Farms | TSLN.com

Schlagel Farms

Amanda Nolz

Courtesy photoThe late Wilbur (Bill) Schlagel and his wife, Mona, have dedicated their lives to the equine industry, raising horses for local rodeo competitors.

In 1899, a young man by the name of Schlagel traveled from Illinois to South Dakota with his wife and four boys in tow. The journey was long, the pace was slow, but an opportunity awaited them that couldn’t be passed up. The Homestead Act of 1862 allowed anyone to file for a quarter section of free land (160 acres). The land belonged to the pioneer at the end of five years if that person built a house on it, dug a well, plowed 10 acres, fenced a specified amount and actually lived there.

When the Schlagel family arrived in the Dakota’s, they settled on a flat area of land located near present day Raymond, SD. It was the beginning of a new life, and in 1906, the claim was proved, and the land was theirs. When the Schlagel boys grew up, they wanted to settle on a plot of land to call their own. Eldest son Oscar continued to live on the homestead sight and another son, Fred, chose a plot a mile away.

In 1899, a young man by the name of Schlagel traveled from Illinois to South Dakota with his wife and four boys in tow. The journey was long, the pace was slow, but an opportunity awaited them that couldn’t be passed up. The Homestead Act of 1862 allowed anyone to file for a quarter section of free land (160 acres). The land belonged to the pioneer at the end of five years if that person built a house on it, dug a well, plowed 10 acres, fenced a specified amount and actually lived there.

When the Schlagel family arrived in the Dakota’s, they settled on a flat area of land located near present day Raymond, SD. It was the beginning of a new life, and in 1906, the claim was proved, and the land was theirs. When the Schlagel boys grew up, they wanted to settle on a plot of land to call their own. Eldest son Oscar continued to live on the homestead sight and another son, Fred, chose a plot a mile away.

In 1899, a young man by the name of Schlagel traveled from Illinois to South Dakota with his wife and four boys in tow. The journey was long, the pace was slow, but an opportunity awaited them that couldn’t be passed up. The Homestead Act of 1862 allowed anyone to file for a quarter section of free land (160 acres). The land belonged to the pioneer at the end of five years if that person built a house on it, dug a well, plowed 10 acres, fenced a specified amount and actually lived there.

When the Schlagel family arrived in the Dakota’s, they settled on a flat area of land located near present day Raymond, SD. It was the beginning of a new life, and in 1906, the claim was proved, and the land was theirs. When the Schlagel boys grew up, they wanted to settle on a plot of land to call their own. Eldest son Oscar continued to live on the homestead sight and another son, Fred, chose a plot a mile away.

Recommended Stories For You

In 1899, a young man by the name of Schlagel traveled from Illinois to South Dakota with his wife and four boys in tow. The journey was long, the pace was slow, but an opportunity awaited them that couldn’t be passed up. The Homestead Act of 1862 allowed anyone to file for a quarter section of free land (160 acres). The land belonged to the pioneer at the end of five years if that person built a house on it, dug a well, plowed 10 acres, fenced a specified amount and actually lived there.

When the Schlagel family arrived in the Dakota’s, they settled on a flat area of land located near present day Raymond, SD. It was the beginning of a new life, and in 1906, the claim was proved, and the land was theirs. When the Schlagel boys grew up, they wanted to settle on a plot of land to call their own. Eldest son Oscar continued to live on the homestead sight and another son, Fred, chose a plot a mile away.

In 1899, a young man by the name of Schlagel traveled from Illinois to South Dakota with his wife and four boys in tow. The journey was long, the pace was slow, but an opportunity awaited them that couldn’t be passed up. The Homestead Act of 1862 allowed anyone to file for a quarter section of free land (160 acres). The land belonged to the pioneer at the end of five years if that person built a house on it, dug a well, plowed 10 acres, fenced a specified amount and actually lived there.

When the Schlagel family arrived in the Dakota’s, they settled on a flat area of land located near present day Raymond, SD. It was the beginning of a new life, and in 1906, the claim was proved, and the land was theirs. When the Schlagel boys grew up, they wanted to settle on a plot of land to call their own. Eldest son Oscar continued to live on the homestead sight and another son, Fred, chose a plot a mile away.