Scotty Philip: The wind in my face | TSLN.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Scotty Philip: The wind in my face

Lonis Wendt
Courtesy photo

Buy Photo

To write a memorable, historic recap of South Dakota legend and Cowboy Hall of Fame member, Scotty Philip, is a daunting challenge and an honor as the communities of Philip, Midland and Ft. Pierre and all points in between commemorate the 100th anniversary of his death from a cerebral hemorrhage on July 23, 1911.

Many will remember the funeral service for Scotty Philip as a day when hundreds of toughened, range-savvy cowboys, Indians, bankers and businessmen from nearly every ranch, round-up wagon or town in western South Dakota congregated at the Philip ranch headquarters and, “with tears coursing down their faces, wept unashamedly.” Another oft-repeated story also tells of the famous buffalo herd drifting over the bluff to witness the last rites for one of South Dakota’s favorite sons.

Our task will be flavored by the many books, verbal stories and a multitude of articles which have appeared in innumerable newspapers, magazines and county Historical Society collections. It is my desire to recreate historic awareness to current and future generations of South Dakotans about the sacrifices and successes encountered by one of our earliest “West River” pioneers as he found his many “homes on the range” along the Bad, White and Missouri River. Hopefully readers will enjoy this brief historical interlude which is directly connected to the area in which we live.

My thanks to all those who originally gathered the stories and the photographs throughout the years.

To write a memorable, historic recap of South Dakota legend and Cowboy Hall of Fame member, Scotty Philip, is a daunting challenge and an honor as the communities of Philip, Midland and Ft. Pierre and all points in between commemorate the 100th anniversary of his death from a cerebral hemorrhage on July 23, 1911.

Many will remember the funeral service for Scotty Philip as a day when hundreds of toughened, range-savvy cowboys, Indians, bankers and businessmen from nearly every ranch, round-up wagon or town in western South Dakota congregated at the Philip ranch headquarters and, “with tears coursing down their faces, wept unashamedly.” Another oft-repeated story also tells of the famous buffalo herd drifting over the bluff to witness the last rites for one of South Dakota’s favorite sons.

Our task will be flavored by the many books, verbal stories and a multitude of articles which have appeared in innumerable newspapers, magazines and county Historical Society collections. It is my desire to recreate historic awareness to current and future generations of South Dakotans about the sacrifices and successes encountered by one of our earliest “West River” pioneers as he found his many “homes on the range” along the Bad, White and Missouri River. Hopefully readers will enjoy this brief historical interlude which is directly connected to the area in which we live.

My thanks to all those who originally gathered the stories and the photographs throughout the years.

Editor’s Note: Lonis Wendt is the Verendrye Museum historian and program coordinator for the Scotty Philip Days trail ride.

This is the first of five chapters commemorating Scotty Philips’ life, leading up to the 100th Scotty Philips Day celebration and trail ride, July 16-23. Coming up next, Chapter 2, “Where’s the gold?”


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User