SD farm kid launches exciting cattle industry career | TSLN.com

SD farm kid launches exciting cattle industry career

Amanda Nolz

Lacey CaffeeThis is one of many photos Lacey took for Derek Jungels for the Memories in the Making club calf sale Memorial Day Weekend.

It’s no secret that the current cattle markets are less than ideal. With escalating input costs in the beef cattle business, it is becoming increasingly impossible for the next generation to stay involved in production agriculture. More often than not, farm and ranch kids are leaving home in pursuit of higher paying jobs in large cities, and who could blame them? Agriculture is a tough career choice, one that requires round-the-clock attention and long days of hard labor.

However, a growing number of young people are finding a way to be involved in production agriculture while pursuing exciting careers that help supplement their cattle businesses. So, is it possible to have your cake and eat it, too? For Lacey Caffee, who grew up on her family’s cattle operation near Wessington Springs, SD, having a career and staying involved in beef production is an option that she didn’t always dream possible.

It’s no secret that the current cattle markets are less than ideal. With escalating input costs in the beef cattle business, it is becoming increasingly impossible for the next generation to stay involved in production agriculture. More often than not, farm and ranch kids are leaving home in pursuit of higher paying jobs in large cities, and who could blame them? Agriculture is a tough career choice, one that requires round-the-clock attention and long days of hard labor.

However, a growing number of young people are finding a way to be involved in production agriculture while pursuing exciting careers that help supplement their cattle businesses. So, is it possible to have your cake and eat it, too? For Lacey Caffee, who grew up on her family’s cattle operation near Wessington Springs, SD, having a career and staying involved in beef production is an option that she didn’t always dream possible.

It’s no secret that the current cattle markets are less than ideal. With escalating input costs in the beef cattle business, it is becoming increasingly impossible for the next generation to stay involved in production agriculture. More often than not, farm and ranch kids are leaving home in pursuit of higher paying jobs in large cities, and who could blame them? Agriculture is a tough career choice, one that requires round-the-clock attention and long days of hard labor.

However, a growing number of young people are finding a way to be involved in production agriculture while pursuing exciting careers that help supplement their cattle businesses. So, is it possible to have your cake and eat it, too? For Lacey Caffee, who grew up on her family’s cattle operation near Wessington Springs, SD, having a career and staying involved in beef production is an option that she didn’t always dream possible.

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It’s no secret that the current cattle markets are less than ideal. With escalating input costs in the beef cattle business, it is becoming increasingly impossible for the next generation to stay involved in production agriculture. More often than not, farm and ranch kids are leaving home in pursuit of higher paying jobs in large cities, and who could blame them? Agriculture is a tough career choice, one that requires round-the-clock attention and long days of hard labor.

However, a growing number of young people are finding a way to be involved in production agriculture while pursuing exciting careers that help supplement their cattle businesses. So, is it possible to have your cake and eat it, too? For Lacey Caffee, who grew up on her family’s cattle operation near Wessington Springs, SD, having a career and staying involved in beef production is an option that she didn’t always dream possible.