SD pork producer committed to sharing ag story | TSLN.com

SD pork producer committed to sharing ag story

Amanda Nolz

Photo by Amanda NolzNinety-eight percent of pork is raised by families, and the Greenway family (left to right: Brent, Peggy, Mandi and Brad), is one of those families dedicated to raising safe, wholesome pork.

It’s certainly not news to anyone in the agriculture industry that livestock producers, especially pork producers, are hurting. A weak economy coupled with high input costs, restrictive new ballot initiatives and a misnamed flu strain have all wreaked havoc on the swine industry.

According to the National Pork Producers Council, pork producers, who prior to the announcement of the H1N1 “outbreak” were already losing money, have seen losses accelerate to an average of $17.69 on each hog marketed since May 1, 2009. Total losses have escalated to 7.2 million a day. During the weeks of the “swine flu scare,” hog prices nationwide dropped to an average of about $59 per 100 pounds of carcass weight, down from about $62 the week before, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Typically, prices climb past $70 in the late spring months because of grilling season.

Despite these many downfalls, pork producers aren’t going to give up without a fight. In light of the misnamed “swine flu,” the industry launched an aggressive campaign to educate consumers about pork safety, and as a result, consumer confidence has now stabilized and returned to normal. However, the dollars lost in the pork industry continue to hurt farmers, and pork producer Brad Greenway is determined to help producers through media outreach and consumer education.

It’s certainly not news to anyone in the agriculture industry that livestock producers, especially pork producers, are hurting. A weak economy coupled with high input costs, restrictive new ballot initiatives and a misnamed flu strain have all wreaked havoc on the swine industry.

According to the National Pork Producers Council, pork producers, who prior to the announcement of the H1N1 “outbreak” were already losing money, have seen losses accelerate to an average of $17.69 on each hog marketed since May 1, 2009. Total losses have escalated to 7.2 million a day. During the weeks of the “swine flu scare,” hog prices nationwide dropped to an average of about $59 per 100 pounds of carcass weight, down from about $62 the week before, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Typically, prices climb past $70 in the late spring months because of grilling season.

Despite these many downfalls, pork producers aren’t going to give up without a fight. In light of the misnamed “swine flu,” the industry launched an aggressive campaign to educate consumers about pork safety, and as a result, consumer confidence has now stabilized and returned to normal. However, the dollars lost in the pork industry continue to hurt farmers, and pork producer Brad Greenway is determined to help producers through media outreach and consumer education.

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It’s certainly not news to anyone in the agriculture industry that livestock producers, especially pork producers, are hurting. A weak economy coupled with high input costs, restrictive new ballot initiatives and a misnamed flu strain have all wreaked havoc on the swine industry.

According to the National Pork Producers Council, pork producers, who prior to the announcement of the H1N1 “outbreak” were already losing money, have seen losses accelerate to an average of $17.69 on each hog marketed since May 1, 2009. Total losses have escalated to 7.2 million a day. During the weeks of the “swine flu scare,” hog prices nationwide dropped to an average of about $59 per 100 pounds of carcass weight, down from about $62 the week before, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Typically, prices climb past $70 in the late spring months because of grilling season.

Despite these many downfalls, pork producers aren’t going to give up without a fight. In light of the misnamed “swine flu,” the industry launched an aggressive campaign to educate consumers about pork safety, and as a result, consumer confidence has now stabilized and returned to normal. However, the dollars lost in the pork industry continue to hurt farmers, and pork producer Brad Greenway is determined to help producers through media outreach and consumer education.

It’s certainly not news to anyone in the agriculture industry that livestock producers, especially pork producers, are hurting. A weak economy coupled with high input costs, restrictive new ballot initiatives and a misnamed flu strain have all wreaked havoc on the swine industry.

According to the National Pork Producers Council, pork producers, who prior to the announcement of the H1N1 “outbreak” were already losing money, have seen losses accelerate to an average of $17.69 on each hog marketed since May 1, 2009. Total losses have escalated to 7.2 million a day. During the weeks of the “swine flu scare,” hog prices nationwide dropped to an average of about $59 per 100 pounds of carcass weight, down from about $62 the week before, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Typically, prices climb past $70 in the late spring months because of grilling season.

Despite these many downfalls, pork producers aren’t going to give up without a fight. In light of the misnamed “swine flu,” the industry launched an aggressive campaign to educate consumers about pork safety, and as a result, consumer confidence has now stabilized and returned to normal. However, the dollars lost in the pork industry continue to hurt farmers, and pork producer Brad Greenway is determined to help producers through media outreach and consumer education.