Second annual Meat Goat Expo held in Nebraska | TSLN.com

Second annual Meat Goat Expo held in Nebraska

Photo by Gayle SmithGloria Floyd shows Melanie Foos how to body condition score her goat during the Meat Goat Expo.

MITCHELL, NE – Meat goat producers gathered in western Nebraska to learn more about their industry and how to become more efficient producers and marketers. The second annual Panhandle Meat Goat Expo was held in Mitchell, NE June 5-7. The event drew producers from Nebraska, Utah, Kansas, Colorado and Wyoming. In addition to educational seminars, a 4-H progress goat show was held on Saturday and a show and sale on Sunday for show goat producers.

One of the main speakers at the event, Tom Boyer of Chalk Creek Boers in Coalville, UT, told the crowd events like this were important for goat producers to attend.

“This is a great opportunity for producers to come together and learn more about the industry,” he said, adding it is also good public relations for producers to be able to bring their goats to show and sell, as well. “Events like this are good exposure for everyone. You have the opportunity to meet new people in an educational setting and talk about goats.”

Boyer also encouraged the group to attend meetings like this to see the competition.

“Competition is good,” he explained. “You can see what your neighbor is doing. Competition helps us become better producers. It is important to come to events like this and pay attention to where your goats fit in related to the rest of the group. If you take a hard look at it and be honest, you’ll market a lot more bucks, commercially, rather than save them for breeding stock. This needs to be done all over the country.

“We have a big surplus of breeding bucks and does out there and not nearly enough commercial stock to meet the demand,” Boyer said.

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It should be a prime goal of the seedstock producer to market their goats to commercial producers, he added.

“They should market their cull does, and I’m not talking about ones with bad teats and health, but ones that aren’t quite up to par in the seedstock operation, to commercial producers,” he says. “The same with the bucks.”

Boyer urged the group to keep the vision of what the meat goat industry is about – goat meat. Ethnic groups currently make up the fastest growing sector of the population in the United States.

“Everybody but us consumes goat meat,” he said. “There is a lot of opportunity for growth in meat goat production. There is a huge demand for goat meat in the world and we are not close to meeting it. If ethnic groups continue to go without it, they will eventually find something else, whether it be chicken or pork or something else, to replace it.”

MITCHELL, NE – Meat goat producers gathered in western Nebraska to learn more about their industry and how to become more efficient producers and marketers. The second annual Panhandle Meat Goat Expo was held in Mitchell, NE June 5-7. The event drew producers from Nebraska, Utah, Kansas, Colorado and Wyoming. In addition to educational seminars, a 4-H progress goat show was held on Saturday and a show and sale on Sunday for show goat producers.

One of the main speakers at the event, Tom Boyer of Chalk Creek Boers in Coalville, UT, told the crowd events like this were important for goat producers to attend.

“This is a great opportunity for producers to come together and learn more about the industry,” he said, adding it is also good public relations for producers to be able to bring their goats to show and sell, as well. “Events like this are good exposure for everyone. You have the opportunity to meet new people in an educational setting and talk about goats.”

Boyer also encouraged the group to attend meetings like this to see the competition.

“Competition is good,” he explained. “You can see what your neighbor is doing. Competition helps us become better producers. It is important to come to events like this and pay attention to where your goats fit in related to the rest of the group. If you take a hard look at it and be honest, you’ll market a lot more bucks, commercially, rather than save them for breeding stock. This needs to be done all over the country.

“We have a big surplus of breeding bucks and does out there and not nearly enough commercial stock to meet the demand,” Boyer said.

It should be a prime goal of the seedstock producer to market their goats to commercial producers, he added.

“They should market their cull does, and I’m not talking about ones with bad teats and health, but ones that aren’t quite up to par in the seedstock operation, to commercial producers,” he says. “The same with the bucks.”

Boyer urged the group to keep the vision of what the meat goat industry is about – goat meat. Ethnic groups currently make up the fastest growing sector of the population in the United States.

“Everybody but us consumes goat meat,” he said. “There is a lot of opportunity for growth in meat goat production. There is a huge demand for goat meat in the world and we are not close to meeting it. If ethnic groups continue to go without it, they will eventually find something else, whether it be chicken or pork or something else, to replace it.”

MITCHELL, NE – Meat goat producers gathered in western Nebraska to learn more about their industry and how to become more efficient producers and marketers. The second annual Panhandle Meat Goat Expo was held in Mitchell, NE June 5-7. The event drew producers from Nebraska, Utah, Kansas, Colorado and Wyoming. In addition to educational seminars, a 4-H progress goat show was held on Saturday and a show and sale on Sunday for show goat producers.

One of the main speakers at the event, Tom Boyer of Chalk Creek Boers in Coalville, UT, told the crowd events like this were important for goat producers to attend.

“This is a great opportunity for producers to come together and learn more about the industry,” he said, adding it is also good public relations for producers to be able to bring their goats to show and sell, as well. “Events like this are good exposure for everyone. You have the opportunity to meet new people in an educational setting and talk about goats.”

Boyer also encouraged the group to attend meetings like this to see the competition.

“Competition is good,” he explained. “You can see what your neighbor is doing. Competition helps us become better producers. It is important to come to events like this and pay attention to where your goats fit in related to the rest of the group. If you take a hard look at it and be honest, you’ll market a lot more bucks, commercially, rather than save them for breeding stock. This needs to be done all over the country.

“We have a big surplus of breeding bucks and does out there and not nearly enough commercial stock to meet the demand,” Boyer said.

It should be a prime goal of the seedstock producer to market their goats to commercial producers, he added.

“They should market their cull does, and I’m not talking about ones with bad teats and health, but ones that aren’t quite up to par in the seedstock operation, to commercial producers,” he says. “The same with the bucks.”

Boyer urged the group to keep the vision of what the meat goat industry is about – goat meat. Ethnic groups currently make up the fastest growing sector of the population in the United States.

“Everybody but us consumes goat meat,” he said. “There is a lot of opportunity for growth in meat goat production. There is a huge demand for goat meat in the world and we are not close to meeting it. If ethnic groups continue to go without it, they will eventually find something else, whether it be chicken or pork or something else, to replace it.”

MITCHELL, NE – Meat goat producers gathered in western Nebraska to learn more about their industry and how to become more efficient producers and marketers. The second annual Panhandle Meat Goat Expo was held in Mitchell, NE June 5-7. The event drew producers from Nebraska, Utah, Kansas, Colorado and Wyoming. In addition to educational seminars, a 4-H progress goat show was held on Saturday and a show and sale on Sunday for show goat producers.

One of the main speakers at the event, Tom Boyer of Chalk Creek Boers in Coalville, UT, told the crowd events like this were important for goat producers to attend.

“This is a great opportunity for producers to come together and learn more about the industry,” he said, adding it is also good public relations for producers to be able to bring their goats to show and sell, as well. “Events like this are good exposure for everyone. You have the opportunity to meet new people in an educational setting and talk about goats.”

Boyer also encouraged the group to attend meetings like this to see the competition.

“Competition is good,” he explained. “You can see what your neighbor is doing. Competition helps us become better producers. It is important to come to events like this and pay attention to where your goats fit in related to the rest of the group. If you take a hard look at it and be honest, you’ll market a lot more bucks, commercially, rather than save them for breeding stock. This needs to be done all over the country.

“We have a big surplus of breeding bucks and does out there and not nearly enough commercial stock to meet the demand,” Boyer said.

It should be a prime goal of the seedstock producer to market their goats to commercial producers, he added.

“They should market their cull does, and I’m not talking about ones with bad teats and health, but ones that aren’t quite up to par in the seedstock operation, to commercial producers,” he says. “The same with the bucks.”

Boyer urged the group to keep the vision of what the meat goat industry is about – goat meat. Ethnic groups currently make up the fastest growing sector of the population in the United States.

“Everybody but us consumes goat meat,” he said. “There is a lot of opportunity for growth in meat goat production. There is a huge demand for goat meat in the world and we are not close to meeting it. If ethnic groups continue to go without it, they will eventually find something else, whether it be chicken or pork or something else, to replace it.”