Showmanship | TSLN.com

Showmanship

Loretta Sorensen

Photo by Loretta SorensenSheep producers lined up for the judge during the Open and Jr Sheep Show at the Sioux Empire Fair in Sioux Falls.

Classic fair temperatures of more than 90 degrees didn’t deter either fair goers or participants at the Sioux Empire Fair in Sioux Falls, SD this week.

Brooke Ollerich of Colton, SD said her work with her Hereford breeding heifer started weeks before her family brought their livestock to the fair.

“It doesn’t take that long to train them to lead,” Brooke says. “But it takes a team of people to do it. You put one person in front, one behind and one on either side.”

Brooke has watched her brother Ty show cattle for the past seven years and picks up a lot of pointers from him. Their father, Tom, says he raises Herefords in part because of their calm disposition.

“They have very good gain rates too,” Tom says. “We keep our calves on pasture until they’re weaned. Then we bring them into the feedlot. Most of the 100 head we raise are sold for breeding stock because they have good depth of rib and good length. We’ve also selected our cattle for good milk from the mothers.”

The Ollerichs have used EPDs to select cattle for their herd. They watch for specific birth weight ranges and the body structure that translates to a quality carcass. Their work has brought them success at shows around the area.

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“Last year we won Reserve Champion in the Breeding Heifer class,” Tom’s wife Deb says. “That was probably one of the highlights of our showing activities.”

Classic fair temperatures of more than 90 degrees didn’t deter either fair goers or participants at the Sioux Empire Fair in Sioux Falls, SD this week.

Brooke Ollerich of Colton, SD said her work with her Hereford breeding heifer started weeks before her family brought their livestock to the fair.

“It doesn’t take that long to train them to lead,” Brooke says. “But it takes a team of people to do it. You put one person in front, one behind and one on either side.”

Brooke has watched her brother Ty show cattle for the past seven years and picks up a lot of pointers from him. Their father, Tom, says he raises Herefords in part because of their calm disposition.

“They have very good gain rates too,” Tom says. “We keep our calves on pasture until they’re weaned. Then we bring them into the feedlot. Most of the 100 head we raise are sold for breeding stock because they have good depth of rib and good length. We’ve also selected our cattle for good milk from the mothers.”

The Ollerichs have used EPDs to select cattle for their herd. They watch for specific birth weight ranges and the body structure that translates to a quality carcass. Their work has brought them success at shows around the area.

“Last year we won Reserve Champion in the Breeding Heifer class,” Tom’s wife Deb says. “That was probably one of the highlights of our showing activities.”

Classic fair temperatures of more than 90 degrees didn’t deter either fair goers or participants at the Sioux Empire Fair in Sioux Falls, SD this week.

Brooke Ollerich of Colton, SD said her work with her Hereford breeding heifer started weeks before her family brought their livestock to the fair.

“It doesn’t take that long to train them to lead,” Brooke says. “But it takes a team of people to do it. You put one person in front, one behind and one on either side.”

Brooke has watched her brother Ty show cattle for the past seven years and picks up a lot of pointers from him. Their father, Tom, says he raises Herefords in part because of their calm disposition.

“They have very good gain rates too,” Tom says. “We keep our calves on pasture until they’re weaned. Then we bring them into the feedlot. Most of the 100 head we raise are sold for breeding stock because they have good depth of rib and good length. We’ve also selected our cattle for good milk from the mothers.”

The Ollerichs have used EPDs to select cattle for their herd. They watch for specific birth weight ranges and the body structure that translates to a quality carcass. Their work has brought them success at shows around the area.

“Last year we won Reserve Champion in the Breeding Heifer class,” Tom’s wife Deb says. “That was probably one of the highlights of our showing activities.”

Classic fair temperatures of more than 90 degrees didn’t deter either fair goers or participants at the Sioux Empire Fair in Sioux Falls, SD this week.

Brooke Ollerich of Colton, SD said her work with her Hereford breeding heifer started weeks before her family brought their livestock to the fair.

“It doesn’t take that long to train them to lead,” Brooke says. “But it takes a team of people to do it. You put one person in front, one behind and one on either side.”

Brooke has watched her brother Ty show cattle for the past seven years and picks up a lot of pointers from him. Their father, Tom, says he raises Herefords in part because of their calm disposition.

“They have very good gain rates too,” Tom says. “We keep our calves on pasture until they’re weaned. Then we bring them into the feedlot. Most of the 100 head we raise are sold for breeding stock because they have good depth of rib and good length. We’ve also selected our cattle for good milk from the mothers.”

The Ollerichs have used EPDs to select cattle for their herd. They watch for specific birth weight ranges and the body structure that translates to a quality carcass. Their work has brought them success at shows around the area.

“Last year we won Reserve Champion in the Breeding Heifer class,” Tom’s wife Deb says. “That was probably one of the highlights of our showing activities.”