South Dakota: All-American Beef Battalion thanks troops with sizzling steaks on May 14 | TSLN.com
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South Dakota: All-American Beef Battalion thanks troops with sizzling steaks on May 14

Members of the 200th Engineer Company, which includes troops from Chamberlain, Mobridge and Pierre, SD, were treated to a meal for kings, provided by South Dakota cattle ranchers and the All-American Beef Battalion (AABB), a Kansas-based group dedicated to saying thanks to the troops with steak. Since 2008, the AABB has served more than 80,000 steaks in events held across the country.

Geared up with 8-oz. ribeyes for the troops and beef hot dogs for the kids, volunteers grilled up a beef feast for the group and their family members. Eight hundred people attended the steak-feed, which was held in Pierre, SD, on May 14 at the National Guard Armory.

This was the first steak feed to be hosted in South Dakota, which quickly gained support from cattlemen’s groups and community members in the state. Raising more than $13,000 from donations, the dollars more than covered the event, and AABB founder, Kansas cattleman and Vietnam veteran Bill Broadie expressed his gratitude for the strong showing in the state.

“Being up here, it’s evident that South Dakota is a proud state,” said Broadie. “Folks up here have a right to be. They put on a good event, with more than enough volunteers and dollars to cover all expenses, and then some. South Dakota cattle ranchers are certainly patriotic and have big hearts. I would rank this event in my top five steak feeds of all time.”

Despite the great turnout, the tone of the event was sad, with the 200th Engineer Company deploying to Afghanistan for a year-long tour of duty the following day. Although there were many tears, the fellowship of the troops and cattlemen was quite evident at the event. After a powerful and emotional national anthem, radio personality, Nebraska cattleman and motivational speaker Trent Loos, welcomed the group with a rousing speech.

“Today’s U.S. citizens simply don’t understand what a soldier’s 236 years of service to protect our freedoms means,” said Loos. “A few years ago, I asked my friends to join me in ‘Red Shirt Fridays,’ an effort to show our gratitude to the troops by wearing a red shirt. After it aired on the radio, I got a phone call from Bill Broadie, who told me that he wanted to start an organization that serves steak to the troops in a way to say thanks. Since then, 80,000 steaks have been served, close to $1 million have been donated and the AABB board of directors has traveled hundreds of thousands of miles just to say thanks to the troops with a ribeye. Behind this effort is a true visionary, Bill Broadie.”

Broadie was brought up to the stage, where he added a few emotional words.

“It’s been 44 years since I was in Vietnam, and I kind of know what you’re going through right now,” acknowledged Broadie. “I want to say thank you to everyone for their sacrifice for our country. God bless every one of you. I wish I was young enough to go with you because I would in a heartbeat.”

With the opening speeches concluded, the event took on a life of its own, with standing room only in the building. Families spent a few precious moments together, cherishing their loved ones before their big departure the next day.

As for the rancher volunteers, being able to witness the day’s events unfold made all of the hard work and donations worthwhile. Seventy-five thousand dollars was raised by Mobridge Livestock Exchange, with another $3,000 coming from the Fort Pierre Livestock Auction. Additional funding came from community members, and finally, the South Dakota Beef Industry Council (SDBIC) and the South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association (SDCA) each donated $1,000.

“The agriculture community in South Dakota sure made a strong showing of their support,” said Broadie. “South Dakota is only one of three state beef councils to make a donation to our cause, joined by California and Colorado. It’s time for other beef councils to step up, don’t you think?”

Patriotism and gratitude for the troops were matched by a new appreciation and understanding of beef producers, and that’s the entire goal of the AABB. To learn more about this non-profit organization, visit http://www.steaksfortroops.com.

Members of the 200th Engineer Company, which includes troops from Chamberlain, Mobridge and Pierre, SD, were treated to a meal for kings, provided by South Dakota cattle ranchers and the All-American Beef Battalion (AABB), a Kansas-based group dedicated to saying thanks to the troops with steak. Since 2008, the AABB has served more than 80,000 steaks in events held across the country.

Geared up with 8-oz. ribeyes for the troops and beef hot dogs for the kids, volunteers grilled up a beef feast for the group and their family members. Eight hundred people attended the steak-feed, which was held in Pierre, SD, on May 14 at the National Guard Armory.

This was the first steak feed to be hosted in South Dakota, which quickly gained support from cattlemen’s groups and community members in the state. Raising more than $13,000 from donations, the dollars more than covered the event, and AABB founder, Kansas cattleman and Vietnam veteran Bill Broadie expressed his gratitude for the strong showing in the state.

“Being up here, it’s evident that South Dakota is a proud state,” said Broadie. “Folks up here have a right to be. They put on a good event, with more than enough volunteers and dollars to cover all expenses, and then some. South Dakota cattle ranchers are certainly patriotic and have big hearts. I would rank this event in my top five steak feeds of all time.”

Despite the great turnout, the tone of the event was sad, with the 200th Engineer Company deploying to Afghanistan for a year-long tour of duty the following day. Although there were many tears, the fellowship of the troops and cattlemen was quite evident at the event. After a powerful and emotional national anthem, radio personality, Nebraska cattleman and motivational speaker Trent Loos, welcomed the group with a rousing speech.

“Today’s U.S. citizens simply don’t understand what a soldier’s 236 years of service to protect our freedoms means,” said Loos. “A few years ago, I asked my friends to join me in ‘Red Shirt Fridays,’ an effort to show our gratitude to the troops by wearing a red shirt. After it aired on the radio, I got a phone call from Bill Broadie, who told me that he wanted to start an organization that serves steak to the troops in a way to say thanks. Since then, 80,000 steaks have been served, close to $1 million have been donated and the AABB board of directors has traveled hundreds of thousands of miles just to say thanks to the troops with a ribeye. Behind this effort is a true visionary, Bill Broadie.”

Broadie was brought up to the stage, where he added a few emotional words.

“It’s been 44 years since I was in Vietnam, and I kind of know what you’re going through right now,” acknowledged Broadie. “I want to say thank you to everyone for their sacrifice for our country. God bless every one of you. I wish I was young enough to go with you because I would in a heartbeat.”

With the opening speeches concluded, the event took on a life of its own, with standing room only in the building. Families spent a few precious moments together, cherishing their loved ones before their big departure the next day.

As for the rancher volunteers, being able to witness the day’s events unfold made all of the hard work and donations worthwhile. Seventy-five thousand dollars was raised by Mobridge Livestock Exchange, with another $3,000 coming from the Fort Pierre Livestock Auction. Additional funding came from community members, and finally, the South Dakota Beef Industry Council (SDBIC) and the South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association (SDCA) each donated $1,000.

“The agriculture community in South Dakota sure made a strong showing of their support,” said Broadie. “South Dakota is only one of three state beef councils to make a donation to our cause, joined by California and Colorado. It’s time for other beef councils to step up, don’t you think?”

Patriotism and gratitude for the troops were matched by a new appreciation and understanding of beef producers, and that’s the entire goal of the AABB. To learn more about this non-profit organization, visit http://www.steaksfortroops.com.

Members of the 200th Engineer Company, which includes troops from Chamberlain, Mobridge and Pierre, SD, were treated to a meal for kings, provided by South Dakota cattle ranchers and the All-American Beef Battalion (AABB), a Kansas-based group dedicated to saying thanks to the troops with steak. Since 2008, the AABB has served more than 80,000 steaks in events held across the country.

Geared up with 8-oz. ribeyes for the troops and beef hot dogs for the kids, volunteers grilled up a beef feast for the group and their family members. Eight hundred people attended the steak-feed, which was held in Pierre, SD, on May 14 at the National Guard Armory.

This was the first steak feed to be hosted in South Dakota, which quickly gained support from cattlemen’s groups and community members in the state. Raising more than $13,000 from donations, the dollars more than covered the event, and AABB founder, Kansas cattleman and Vietnam veteran Bill Broadie expressed his gratitude for the strong showing in the state.

“Being up here, it’s evident that South Dakota is a proud state,” said Broadie. “Folks up here have a right to be. They put on a good event, with more than enough volunteers and dollars to cover all expenses, and then some. South Dakota cattle ranchers are certainly patriotic and have big hearts. I would rank this event in my top five steak feeds of all time.”

Despite the great turnout, the tone of the event was sad, with the 200th Engineer Company deploying to Afghanistan for a year-long tour of duty the following day. Although there were many tears, the fellowship of the troops and cattlemen was quite evident at the event. After a powerful and emotional national anthem, radio personality, Nebraska cattleman and motivational speaker Trent Loos, welcomed the group with a rousing speech.

“Today’s U.S. citizens simply don’t understand what a soldier’s 236 years of service to protect our freedoms means,” said Loos. “A few years ago, I asked my friends to join me in ‘Red Shirt Fridays,’ an effort to show our gratitude to the troops by wearing a red shirt. After it aired on the radio, I got a phone call from Bill Broadie, who told me that he wanted to start an organization that serves steak to the troops in a way to say thanks. Since then, 80,000 steaks have been served, close to $1 million have been donated and the AABB board of directors has traveled hundreds of thousands of miles just to say thanks to the troops with a ribeye. Behind this effort is a true visionary, Bill Broadie.”

Broadie was brought up to the stage, where he added a few emotional words.

“It’s been 44 years since I was in Vietnam, and I kind of know what you’re going through right now,” acknowledged Broadie. “I want to say thank you to everyone for their sacrifice for our country. God bless every one of you. I wish I was young enough to go with you because I would in a heartbeat.”

With the opening speeches concluded, the event took on a life of its own, with standing room only in the building. Families spent a few precious moments together, cherishing their loved ones before their big departure the next day.

As for the rancher volunteers, being able to witness the day’s events unfold made all of the hard work and donations worthwhile. Seventy-five thousand dollars was raised by Mobridge Livestock Exchange, with another $3,000 coming from the Fort Pierre Livestock Auction. Additional funding came from community members, and finally, the South Dakota Beef Industry Council (SDBIC) and the South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association (SDCA) each donated $1,000.

“The agriculture community in South Dakota sure made a strong showing of their support,” said Broadie. “South Dakota is only one of three state beef councils to make a donation to our cause, joined by California and Colorado. It’s time for other beef councils to step up, don’t you think?”

Patriotism and gratitude for the troops were matched by a new appreciation and understanding of beef producers, and that’s the entire goal of the AABB. To learn more about this non-profit organization, visit http://www.steaksfortroops.com.


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