Students gain appreciation for value-added meats | TSLN.com

Students gain appreciation for value-added meats

Amanda Nolz

Photo by Amanda NolzCrowds lined up at the SDSU meat lab with evaluation cards in hand, while junior animal science major, Garrett Davis, served up his crowd-pleasing "Beer and Pickle Brats."

Hundreds of students and community members filter into the hallways of the South Dakota State University (SDSU) meat science laboratory. The smell of sausage and jerky fills the air. It’s that time of year again for the Taste of Animal Science 345 Product Show, held on April 29, 2009. For students of the animal science course, Value-Added Meats 345, this is a chance to highlight and share their new knowledge and experiences in the meat retail industry with the entire community.

This event is the final assignment for students in the course, and their goal is to create a creative, low-cost, value-added meat product that will win the votes of the community. Students experiment with recipes using low-value raw ingredients such as beef heart and liver, bison, sheep and goat to create a premium product, and voting participants must follow an evaluation sheet that ranks the product for tastiness and cost on a numbered scale. Certainly, this is one of those classes that makes a student appreciate the agriculture industry outside of the pasture gates.

“This class is focused on teaching students of the economics, science and art of value-added meats,” said Duane Wulf, Ph.D., in the meat science department at SDSU. “Students are challenged to create a great tasting product that consumers would be willing to pay for. This class has been taught for four years, and we decided the best way to evaluate these products was to analyze both taste and price of the value-added meats.”

Hundreds of students and community members filter into the hallways of the South Dakota State University (SDSU) meat science laboratory. The smell of sausage and jerky fills the air. It’s that time of year again for the Taste of Animal Science 345 Product Show, held on April 29, 2009. For students of the animal science course, Value-Added Meats 345, this is a chance to highlight and share their new knowledge and experiences in the meat retail industry with the entire community.

This event is the final assignment for students in the course, and their goal is to create a creative, low-cost, value-added meat product that will win the votes of the community. Students experiment with recipes using low-value raw ingredients such as beef heart and liver, bison, sheep and goat to create a premium product, and voting participants must follow an evaluation sheet that ranks the product for tastiness and cost on a numbered scale. Certainly, this is one of those classes that makes a student appreciate the agriculture industry outside of the pasture gates.

“This class is focused on teaching students of the economics, science and art of value-added meats,” said Duane Wulf, Ph.D., in the meat science department at SDSU. “Students are challenged to create a great tasting product that consumers would be willing to pay for. This class has been taught for four years, and we decided the best way to evaluate these products was to analyze both taste and price of the value-added meats.”

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Hundreds of students and community members filter into the hallways of the South Dakota State University (SDSU) meat science laboratory. The smell of sausage and jerky fills the air. It’s that time of year again for the Taste of Animal Science 345 Product Show, held on April 29, 2009. For students of the animal science course, Value-Added Meats 345, this is a chance to highlight and share their new knowledge and experiences in the meat retail industry with the entire community.

This event is the final assignment for students in the course, and their goal is to create a creative, low-cost, value-added meat product that will win the votes of the community. Students experiment with recipes using low-value raw ingredients such as beef heart and liver, bison, sheep and goat to create a premium product, and voting participants must follow an evaluation sheet that ranks the product for tastiness and cost on a numbered scale. Certainly, this is one of those classes that makes a student appreciate the agriculture industry outside of the pasture gates.

“This class is focused on teaching students of the economics, science and art of value-added meats,” said Duane Wulf, Ph.D., in the meat science department at SDSU. “Students are challenged to create a great tasting product that consumers would be willing to pay for. This class has been taught for four years, and we decided the best way to evaluate these products was to analyze both taste and price of the value-added meats.”