Taking a look at the Beef Checkoff | TSLN.com

Taking a look at the Beef Checkoff

Amanda Nolz

Photo by Amanda NolzCalifornia Beef Ambassador Melissa Green serves veal and explains the nutrition facts to a consumer at the Pennsylvania Farm Show.

Five bold, red shirts walk into a trade show. The shirts, blazoned with the words, “National Beef Ambassadors,” are easily recognized as much more than starched and ironed cloth. Proudly wearing these shirts are five young people, selected from a competitive pool of their peers, to serve as spokespeople for the beef industry for a year. Sponsored by the American National CattleWomen’s Association and the Beef Checkoff Program, these young people are passionate and enthusiastic to share their knowledge about beef to consumers and to educate producers about the Beef Checkoff Program.

Some days, working trade shows are easy. On those days, everyone seems to love the beef samples served, mothers want new recipes to feed their children and cattle producers suddenly smile at the idea that their Checkoff dollars are being spent by young people who are sharing their story. On other days, promoting beef is tough. People yell at the ambassadors for killing animals, hate mail is sent about how cattle raising destroys the environment, nasty media articles must be responded to, and it seems that everyone is against livestock production for the world’s food supply.

Yet, the National Beef Ambassadors seem to always maintain their positive attitudes and unyielding delivery of messages about beef nutrition, safety and production. On a budget of $118,000, these five young people produce 20 million media impressions, 115,000 consumer impressions and 24,000 student impressions in a single year. For many, the National Beef Ambassador Program was Checkoff dollars well spent. However, after recent Beef Checkoff cuts, this program is no more.

Five bold, red shirts walk into a trade show. The shirts, blazoned with the words, “National Beef Ambassadors,” are easily recognized as much more than starched and ironed cloth. Proudly wearing these shirts are five young people, selected from a competitive pool of their peers, to serve as spokespeople for the beef industry for a year. Sponsored by the American National CattleWomen’s Association and the Beef Checkoff Program, these young people are passionate and enthusiastic to share their knowledge about beef to consumers and to educate producers about the Beef Checkoff Program.

Some days, working trade shows are easy. On those days, everyone seems to love the beef samples served, mothers want new recipes to feed their children and cattle producers suddenly smile at the idea that their Checkoff dollars are being spent by young people who are sharing their story. On other days, promoting beef is tough. People yell at the ambassadors for killing animals, hate mail is sent about how cattle raising destroys the environment, nasty media articles must be responded to, and it seems that everyone is against livestock production for the world’s food supply.

Yet, the National Beef Ambassadors seem to always maintain their positive attitudes and unyielding delivery of messages about beef nutrition, safety and production. On a budget of $118,000, these five young people produce 20 million media impressions, 115,000 consumer impressions and 24,000 student impressions in a single year. For many, the National Beef Ambassador Program was Checkoff dollars well spent. However, after recent Beef Checkoff cuts, this program is no more.

Recommended Stories For You

Five bold, red shirts walk into a trade show. The shirts, blazoned with the words, “National Beef Ambassadors,” are easily recognized as much more than starched and ironed cloth. Proudly wearing these shirts are five young people, selected from a competitive pool of their peers, to serve as spokespeople for the beef industry for a year. Sponsored by the American National CattleWomen’s Association and the Beef Checkoff Program, these young people are passionate and enthusiastic to share their knowledge about beef to consumers and to educate producers about the Beef Checkoff Program.

Some days, working trade shows are easy. On those days, everyone seems to love the beef samples served, mothers want new recipes to feed their children and cattle producers suddenly smile at the idea that their Checkoff dollars are being spent by young people who are sharing their story. On other days, promoting beef is tough. People yell at the ambassadors for killing animals, hate mail is sent about how cattle raising destroys the environment, nasty media articles must be responded to, and it seems that everyone is against livestock production for the world’s food supply.

Yet, the National Beef Ambassadors seem to always maintain their positive attitudes and unyielding delivery of messages about beef nutrition, safety and production. On a budget of $118,000, these five young people produce 20 million media impressions, 115,000 consumer impressions and 24,000 student impressions in a single year. For many, the National Beef Ambassador Program was Checkoff dollars well spent. However, after recent Beef Checkoff cuts, this program is no more.

Five bold, red shirts walk into a trade show. The shirts, blazoned with the words, “National Beef Ambassadors,” are easily recognized as much more than starched and ironed cloth. Proudly wearing these shirts are five young people, selected from a competitive pool of their peers, to serve as spokespeople for the beef industry for a year. Sponsored by the American National CattleWomen’s Association and the Beef Checkoff Program, these young people are passionate and enthusiastic to share their knowledge about beef to consumers and to educate producers about the Beef Checkoff Program.

Some days, working trade shows are easy. On those days, everyone seems to love the beef samples served, mothers want new recipes to feed their children and cattle producers suddenly smile at the idea that their Checkoff dollars are being spent by young people who are sharing their story. On other days, promoting beef is tough. People yell at the ambassadors for killing animals, hate mail is sent about how cattle raising destroys the environment, nasty media articles must be responded to, and it seems that everyone is against livestock production for the world’s food supply.

Yet, the National Beef Ambassadors seem to always maintain their positive attitudes and unyielding delivery of messages about beef nutrition, safety and production. On a budget of $118,000, these five young people produce 20 million media impressions, 115,000 consumer impressions and 24,000 student impressions in a single year. For many, the National Beef Ambassador Program was Checkoff dollars well spent. However, after recent Beef Checkoff cuts, this program is no more.