The Good Life | TSLN.com

The Good Life

Photo by Jan Swan WoodBrady and Wendi Rinehart, living the good life.

Rolling prairie stretches for miles in every direction. Last year’s grass carpets the country, protecting the new spring grass from the cold. Water trickles down the draws and fills the natural basins on the prairie, which lend the name “Prairie Potholes” to this part of the Missouri Coteau and Hyde County. It’s ranching country at its finest and shows the care that has been taken over the years to preserve the natural abundance of the native grasses.

The Rinehart family has been on this ranch since 1950, when Harold and Marilyn, purchased it from the original homestead family, the MacNamara’s. The homesteaders back then soon found that it wasn’t farm country – due to an abundance of rocks and low rainfall – eventually they restored the prairie, which was required to be plowed by the Homestead Act back in the day, to mostly grazing land. When Harold made the offer to buy the ranch, it was with a stipulation they would leave the bulk of it to grass. Acquiring a US Fish & Wildlife Service grassland/wetland easement in 2003 fortified that promise for the native prairie to remain. Initially the Rinehart’s raised horses and ran about 2,000 sheep. The sheep were gradually replaced with cattle, but, the good horses remained.

In 1982 the ranch became a partnership, with the senior Rinehart’s and their sons Brady and Dave working together. Harold and Marilyn sold their interest to their sons in 1992. By 2003 the partnership was dissolved and divided, and each family went on their own.

In the early ’80s, Pompadour Hills Ranch had one of the biggest registered Limousin herds in the nation, with a show string that traveled to promote the cattle and registered bulls being sold all over the country.

Rolling prairie stretches for miles in every direction. Last year’s grass carpets the country, protecting the new spring grass from the cold. Water trickles down the draws and fills the natural basins on the prairie, which lend the name “Prairie Potholes” to this part of the Missouri Coteau and Hyde County. It’s ranching country at its finest and shows the care that has been taken over the years to preserve the natural abundance of the native grasses.

The Rinehart family has been on this ranch since 1950, when Harold and Marilyn, purchased it from the original homestead family, the MacNamara’s. The homesteaders back then soon found that it wasn’t farm country – due to an abundance of rocks and low rainfall – eventually they restored the prairie, which was required to be plowed by the Homestead Act back in the day, to mostly grazing land. When Harold made the offer to buy the ranch, it was with a stipulation they would leave the bulk of it to grass. Acquiring a US Fish & Wildlife Service grassland/wetland easement in 2003 fortified that promise for the native prairie to remain. Initially the Rinehart’s raised horses and ran about 2,000 sheep. The sheep were gradually replaced with cattle, but, the good horses remained.

Recommended Stories For You

In 1982 the ranch became a partnership, with the senior Rinehart’s and their sons Brady and Dave working together. Harold and Marilyn sold their interest to their sons in 1992. By 2003 the partnership was dissolved and divided, and each family went on their own.

In the early ’80s, Pompadour Hills Ranch had one of the biggest registered Limousin herds in the nation, with a show string that traveled to promote the cattle and registered bulls being sold all over the country.

Rolling prairie stretches for miles in every direction. Last year’s grass carpets the country, protecting the new spring grass from the cold. Water trickles down the draws and fills the natural basins on the prairie, which lend the name “Prairie Potholes” to this part of the Missouri Coteau and Hyde County. It’s ranching country at its finest and shows the care that has been taken over the years to preserve the natural abundance of the native grasses.

The Rinehart family has been on this ranch since 1950, when Harold and Marilyn, purchased it from the original homestead family, the MacNamara’s. The homesteaders back then soon found that it wasn’t farm country – due to an abundance of rocks and low rainfall – eventually they restored the prairie, which was required to be plowed by the Homestead Act back in the day, to mostly grazing land. When Harold made the offer to buy the ranch, it was with a stipulation they would leave the bulk of it to grass. Acquiring a US Fish & Wildlife Service grassland/wetland easement in 2003 fortified that promise for the native prairie to remain. Initially the Rinehart’s raised horses and ran about 2,000 sheep. The sheep were gradually replaced with cattle, but, the good horses remained.

In 1982 the ranch became a partnership, with the senior Rinehart’s and their sons Brady and Dave working together. Harold and Marilyn sold their interest to their sons in 1992. By 2003 the partnership was dissolved and divided, and each family went on their own.

In the early ’80s, Pompadour Hills Ranch had one of the biggest registered Limousin herds in the nation, with a show string that traveled to promote the cattle and registered bulls being sold all over the country.

Rolling prairie stretches for miles in every direction. Last year’s grass carpets the country, protecting the new spring grass from the cold. Water trickles down the draws and fills the natural basins on the prairie, which lend the name “Prairie Potholes” to this part of the Missouri Coteau and Hyde County. It’s ranching country at its finest and shows the care that has been taken over the years to preserve the natural abundance of the native grasses.

The Rinehart family has been on this ranch since 1950, when Harold and Marilyn, purchased it from the original homestead family, the MacNamara’s. The homesteaders back then soon found that it wasn’t farm country – due to an abundance of rocks and low rainfall – eventually they restored the prairie, which was required to be plowed by the Homestead Act back in the day, to mostly grazing land. When Harold made the offer to buy the ranch, it was with a stipulation they would leave the bulk of it to grass. Acquiring a US Fish & Wildlife Service grassland/wetland easement in 2003 fortified that promise for the native prairie to remain. Initially the Rinehart’s raised horses and ran about 2,000 sheep. The sheep were gradually replaced with cattle, but, the good horses remained.

In 1982 the ranch became a partnership, with the senior Rinehart’s and their sons Brady and Dave working together. Harold and Marilyn sold their interest to their sons in 1992. By 2003 the partnership was dissolved and divided, and each family went on their own.

In the early ’80s, Pompadour Hills Ranch had one of the biggest registered Limousin herds in the nation, with a show string that traveled to promote the cattle and registered bulls being sold all over the country.

Rolling prairie stretches for miles in every direction. Last year’s grass carpets the country, protecting the new spring grass from the cold. Water trickles down the draws and fills the natural basins on the prairie, which lend the name “Prairie Potholes” to this part of the Missouri Coteau and Hyde County. It’s ranching country at its finest and shows the care that has been taken over the years to preserve the natural abundance of the native grasses.

The Rinehart family has been on this ranch since 1950, when Harold and Marilyn, purchased it from the original homestead family, the MacNamara’s. The homesteaders back then soon found that it wasn’t farm country – due to an abundance of rocks and low rainfall – eventually they restored the prairie, which was required to be plowed by the Homestead Act back in the day, to mostly grazing land. When Harold made the offer to buy the ranch, it was with a stipulation they would leave the bulk of it to grass. Acquiring a US Fish & Wildlife Service grassland/wetland easement in 2003 fortified that promise for the native prairie to remain. Initially the Rinehart’s raised horses and ran about 2,000 sheep. The sheep were gradually replaced with cattle, but, the good horses remained.

In 1982 the ranch became a partnership, with the senior Rinehart’s and their sons Brady and Dave working together. Harold and Marilyn sold their interest to their sons in 1992. By 2003 the partnership was dissolved and divided, and each family went on their own.

In the early ’80s, Pompadour Hills Ranch had one of the biggest registered Limousin herds in the nation, with a show string that traveled to promote the cattle and registered bulls being sold all over the country.

Rolling prairie stretches for miles in every direction. Last year’s grass carpets the country, protecting the new spring grass from the cold. Water trickles down the draws and fills the natural basins on the prairie, which lend the name “Prairie Potholes” to this part of the Missouri Coteau and Hyde County. It’s ranching country at its finest and shows the care that has been taken over the years to preserve the natural abundance of the native grasses.

The Rinehart family has been on this ranch since 1950, when Harold and Marilyn, purchased it from the original homestead family, the MacNamara’s. The homesteaders back then soon found that it wasn’t farm country – due to an abundance of rocks and low rainfall – eventually they restored the prairie, which was required to be plowed by the Homestead Act back in the day, to mostly grazing land. When Harold made the offer to buy the ranch, it was with a stipulation they would leave the bulk of it to grass. Acquiring a US Fish & Wildlife Service grassland/wetland easement in 2003 fortified that promise for the native prairie to remain. Initially the Rinehart’s raised horses and ran about 2,000 sheep. The sheep were gradually replaced with cattle, but, the good horses remained.

In 1982 the ranch became a partnership, with the senior Rinehart’s and their sons Brady and Dave working together. Harold and Marilyn sold their interest to their sons in 1992. By 2003 the partnership was dissolved and divided, and each family went on their own.

In the early ’80s, Pompadour Hills Ranch had one of the biggest registered Limousin herds in the nation, with a show string that traveled to promote the cattle and registered bulls being sold all over the country.

Rolling prairie stretches for miles in every direction. Last year’s grass carpets the country, protecting the new spring grass from the cold. Water trickles down the draws and fills the natural basins on the prairie, which lend the name “Prairie Potholes” to this part of the Missouri Coteau and Hyde County. It’s ranching country at its finest and shows the care that has been taken over the years to preserve the natural abundance of the native grasses.

The Rinehart family has been on this ranch since 1950, when Harold and Marilyn, purchased it from the original homestead family, the MacNamara’s. The homesteaders back then soon found that it wasn’t farm country – due to an abundance of rocks and low rainfall – eventually they restored the prairie, which was required to be plowed by the Homestead Act back in the day, to mostly grazing land. When Harold made the offer to buy the ranch, it was with a stipulation they would leave the bulk of it to grass. Acquiring a US Fish & Wildlife Service grassland/wetland easement in 2003 fortified that promise for the native prairie to remain. Initially the Rinehart’s raised horses and ran about 2,000 sheep. The sheep were gradually replaced with cattle, but, the good horses remained.

In 1982 the ranch became a partnership, with the senior Rinehart’s and their sons Brady and Dave working together. Harold and Marilyn sold their interest to their sons in 1992. By 2003 the partnership was dissolved and divided, and each family went on their own.

In the early ’80s, Pompadour Hills Ranch had one of the biggest registered Limousin herds in the nation, with a show string that traveled to promote the cattle and registered bulls being sold all over the country.

Rolling prairie stretches for miles in every direction. Last year’s grass carpets the country, protecting the new spring grass from the cold. Water trickles down the draws and fills the natural basins on the prairie, which lend the name “Prairie Potholes” to this part of the Missouri Coteau and Hyde County. It’s ranching country at its finest and shows the care that has been taken over the years to preserve the natural abundance of the native grasses.

The Rinehart family has been on this ranch since 1950, when Harold and Marilyn, purchased it from the original homestead family, the MacNamara’s. The homesteaders back then soon found that it wasn’t farm country – due to an abundance of rocks and low rainfall – eventually they restored the prairie, which was required to be plowed by the Homestead Act back in the day, to mostly grazing land. When Harold made the offer to buy the ranch, it was with a stipulation they would leave the bulk of it to grass. Acquiring a US Fish & Wildlife Service grassland/wetland easement in 2003 fortified that promise for the native prairie to remain. Initially the Rinehart’s raised horses and ran about 2,000 sheep. The sheep were gradually replaced with cattle, but, the good horses remained.

In 1982 the ranch became a partnership, with the senior Rinehart’s and their sons Brady and Dave working together. Harold and Marilyn sold their interest to their sons in 1992. By 2003 the partnership was dissolved and divided, and each family went on their own.

In the early ’80s, Pompadour Hills Ranch had one of the biggest registered Limousin herds in the nation, with a show string that traveled to promote the cattle and registered bulls being sold all over the country.

Rolling prairie stretches for miles in every direction. Last year’s grass carpets the country, protecting the new spring grass from the cold. Water trickles down the draws and fills the natural basins on the prairie, which lend the name “Prairie Potholes” to this part of the Missouri Coteau and Hyde County. It’s ranching country at its finest and shows the care that has been taken over the years to preserve the natural abundance of the native grasses.

The Rinehart family has been on this ranch since 1950, when Harold and Marilyn, purchased it from the original homestead family, the MacNamara’s. The homesteaders back then soon found that it wasn’t farm country – due to an abundance of rocks and low rainfall – eventually they restored the prairie, which was required to be plowed by the Homestead Act back in the day, to mostly grazing land. When Harold made the offer to buy the ranch, it was with a stipulation they would leave the bulk of it to grass. Acquiring a US Fish & Wildlife Service grassland/wetland easement in 2003 fortified that promise for the native prairie to remain. Initially the Rinehart’s raised horses and ran about 2,000 sheep. The sheep were gradually replaced with cattle, but, the good horses remained.

In 1982 the ranch became a partnership, with the senior Rinehart’s and their sons Brady and Dave working together. Harold and Marilyn sold their interest to their sons in 1992. By 2003 the partnership was dissolved and divided, and each family went on their own.

In the early ’80s, Pompadour Hills Ranch had one of the biggest registered Limousin herds in the nation, with a show string that traveled to promote the cattle and registered bulls being sold all over the country.