The Rancher Kind | TSLN.com

The Rancher Kind

Photos by Jan Swan WoodRounds Angus cattle

The cow/calf pairs are scattered from the creek bottoms to the slopes of the high ridges. Big, muscular bull calves stand up high against their mothers’ sides, shoving them as they nurse. Still big babies, they already exhibit very mature characteristics, with muscular quarters, broad backs, masculine heads and well-developed scrotums. The heifer calves are mirror images of their mothers; deep flanked and long-bodied with a feminine head. The calves were born starting mid-February and are glossy fat on the summer grass.

The cows are very uniform, moderate in size and all have excellent udders. Though purebreds and raising future commercial herd sires, they are run strictly as range cows. They thrive on grass and are supplemented with hay in the winter. That’s just the way Harley Rounds likes it – the less fuss, the better.

Rounds Angus, 17 miles northwest of Union Center, SD, is off the beaten path, but worth the drive to see the cattle in their working clothes. Harley and Colleen Rounds have been in the purebred business for 38 years, and in the Angus business for 19 of them. They started in the purebred business in 1971 with Simmentals.

In the spring of 1990 they bought their first Angus cows from Bruce Sedman of Henry, NE. The cows carried the blood of such bulls as Cast Iron and Mr. Angus. They were older cow/calf pairs and they bred them back to a polled black Simmental bull they had purchased with the intent of breeding up to purebred, black Simmentals.

That fall, when they weaned those purebred Angus calves, they were really impressed with everything about them. They sold the Simmental bull and went after more Angus cows. The next spring they started A.I.ing to Angus bulls.

They added some more cows from Lund’s B Bar Angus of Wibaux, MT, mostly daughters of Rope. These cows raised really good calves and, like the other Angus cows, were easier to maintain. The next year, they bought more B Bar heifers, plus some from Medicine Rocks Angus of Ekalaka, MT. The third year, they bought a few more heifers from the Mehlings at Medicine Rocks. Their Angus cowherd was firmly established.

Recommended Stories For You

The Simmental cows were slowly phased out during those years, until the Rounds had only the top end, red cows left of them.

The spring of 1997 made them take a hard look at the Simmental cows. Harley says, “We had that big storm and the Angus cows got along okay. The red cows were really disoriented by it, couldn’t find their calves, and really had trouble.”

That eye-opening experience, with the two breeds running together, finally convinced them to focus on the Angus. In 1998 the last of the red cows were sold.

Today, there are a handful of black, Simmental cross cows still in the cowherd.

“We have a guy that wants the Angus/Simmental cross bulls, so I try to raise a few,” says Harley. These cows are only distinguished from the Angus by the white marking on their heads, as they are the same size and frame.

Low maintainance cows are the goal. The less the Rounds have to do for them, the better. The cows harvest the native grass and convert it into ample milk, all the while climbing steep ridges, sliding off of the banks of draws and covering the country easy. They maintain their body condition without supplements of any kind, and breed back on time, with a short calving period.

Calving ease is also required. They simply don’t want to pull calves. “I don’t miss that,” quips Colleen. They have selected for calving ease and high maternal values in the bulls they have used for A.I.ing. Their cowherd carries a heavy percentage of Freightliner, Expectation 4915, and New Frontier 095 daughters.

Last year they used homegrown bulls and are really pleased with the results. “I like the calves and I didn’t have to mess around with all the work of A.I.ing,” grins Harley.

The replacement heifers, also matronly, feminine, and moderate framed, were bred to yearling, homegrown bulls, with the exception of two yearling bulls that were purchased. The young bulls held their flesh and grew well during the breeding season, once again showing the good forage conversion Rounds have been striving for. The heifers graze in a rough pasture with steep hillsides and rugged draws to travel to get to water. Besides the home raised heifers, there are a few heifers Todd purchased from Lunds B Bar Angus as well.

“This year I bought a few straws of semen of two bulls from Scotland and used them early on 30 head,” says Harley. “I’m sure looking forward to those calves to see what they look like.”

Harley and Colleen like the qualities these fresh genetics offer for carcass performance, high grass conversion, maternal superiority and easy calving. The potential hybrid vigor offered by the complete genetic outcross is also exciting.

The two bulls, imported by Genex, are pure Scottish Aberdeen Angus. Jipsey Earl and Cortachy Boy sport 78 pound and 73 pound birthweights, respectively. The cattle are noted for being moderate framed with a wide base, high feed conversion, shorter gestation, and superior females. Harley adds, “They are so wide that they leave two trails when they walk, instead of a regular cow trail.”

Harley and Colleen, who is postmaster at Union Center, have been married 38 years, and have two grown children. Daughter Amy and husband Chato Edoff live near Fairfax, SD and their seven children are Sidney, 14, Trae, 10, Thyme, 9, True, 7, Lando, 5, Treat, 2, and Laken, 1. Amy works at Devine Concrete in Bonesteel, and Chato runs a bootshop there.

Son Todd and his wife Sarah have two boys, Troy, 9, and Sam, 6, and live on the home ranch. Their boys are the sixth generation on the ranch that was homesteaded by Harley’s grandparents in 1908. Todd works shifts in the Black Thunder Coal Mine near Wright, WY, and spends his off days working with his folks on the ranch.

They use Quarter Horses for their cow work and A.I.ing, and the saddle string is ready for a rest once that is done.

It’s not all work and no play for Harley and Colleen, though. Harley enjoys getting his favorite motorcycle, a Harley Davidson, out and cruising the Black Hills and beyond.

Weaning time is fast approaching, as the bull calves and heifer replacements will be brought in, weighed and weaned mid-September. The other calves will be sold off of the cows in mid-October.

“Last year our bull calves had an adjusted 205 day weight of 691 pounds, with nothing but grass and water,” says Harley. When they are weaned, they are fed hay and a product from Scranton, ND, called “Bull Developer.” It’s a grain-based pellet with no corn in it. Harley says, “They do really well on it. They eat it good and start eating it right off at weaning.”

Once weaned, the bull calves are turned into a rough pasture with high hills to climb, draws to cross, and plenty of grass to graze. They are fed the “Bull Developer” pellets until they are sold in the spring. The bulls grow up with sound feet and legs, are fit and ready to go to work when they are turned with cows as yearlings, and stay sound and healthy for a long time, which is a bonus for the commercial cowman that buys them.

The Rounds sell the bulls private treaty at the ranch, with the opportunity for the buyer to really study them, handle them, and compare them as individuals. There’s no baby-fat or bad feet to sort through, and bad attitude has already been eliminated through culling. The bulls stay at the ranch if the buyer prefers, and Harley delivers them later in the spring.

Harley and Colleen just plan on keeping on with the program, focusing on maternal qualities and improving grass conversion. As to what bloodlines they will pursue, Harley says, “We’ve still got some Freightliner semen that we’re using carefully, making it last. I see some new bulls in the Angus that I might try too.” He adds, “If we like the calves by the Scottish bulls we may go with more of them.”

Rounds Angus raises practical, rancher cattle that fit the hard grass prairie of the northern plains. The cattle have adapted to the country, as have the people. As Harley and Colleen have done, Todd and his family are doing what it takes to stay on the ranch. The good black cows will surely graze the rugged hills and another generation of Rounds will be watching over them for many years to come.

The cow/calf pairs are scattered from the creek bottoms to the slopes of the high ridges. Big, muscular bull calves stand up high against their mothers’ sides, shoving them as they nurse. Still big babies, they already exhibit very mature characteristics, with muscular quarters, broad backs, masculine heads and well-developed scrotums. The heifer calves are mirror images of their mothers; deep flanked and long-bodied with a feminine head. The calves were born starting mid-February and are glossy fat on the summer grass.

The cows are very uniform, moderate in size and all have excellent udders. Though purebreds and raising future commercial herd sires, they are run strictly as range cows. They thrive on grass and are supplemented with hay in the winter. That’s just the way Harley Rounds likes it – the less fuss, the better.

Rounds Angus, 17 miles northwest of Union Center, SD, is off the beaten path, but worth the drive to see the cattle in their working clothes. Harley and Colleen Rounds have been in the purebred business for 38 years, and in the Angus business for 19 of them. They started in the purebred business in 1971 with Simmentals.

In the spring of 1990 they bought their first Angus cows from Bruce Sedman of Henry, NE. The cows carried the blood of such bulls as Cast Iron and Mr. Angus. They were older cow/calf pairs and they bred them back to a polled black Simmental bull they had purchased with the intent of breeding up to purebred, black Simmentals.

That fall, when they weaned those purebred Angus calves, they were really impressed with everything about them. They sold the Simmental bull and went after more Angus cows. The next spring they started A.I.ing to Angus bulls.

They added some more cows from Lund’s B Bar Angus of Wibaux, MT, mostly daughters of Rope. These cows raised really good calves and, like the other Angus cows, were easier to maintain. The next year, they bought more B Bar heifers, plus some from Medicine Rocks Angus of Ekalaka, MT. The third year, they bought a few more heifers from the Mehlings at Medicine Rocks. Their Angus cowherd was firmly established.

The Simmental cows were slowly phased out during those years, until the Rounds had only the top end, red cows left of them.

The spring of 1997 made them take a hard look at the Simmental cows. Harley says, “We had that big storm and the Angus cows got along okay. The red cows were really disoriented by it, couldn’t find their calves, and really had trouble.”

That eye-opening experience, with the two breeds running together, finally convinced them to focus on the Angus. In 1998 the last of the red cows were sold.

Today, there are a handful of black, Simmental cross cows still in the cowherd.

“We have a guy that wants the Angus/Simmental cross bulls, so I try to raise a few,” says Harley. These cows are only distinguished from the Angus by the white marking on their heads, as they are the same size and frame.

Low maintainance cows are the goal. The less the Rounds have to do for them, the better. The cows harvest the native grass and convert it into ample milk, all the while climbing steep ridges, sliding off of the banks of draws and covering the country easy. They maintain their body condition without supplements of any kind, and breed back on time, with a short calving period.

Calving ease is also required. They simply don’t want to pull calves. “I don’t miss that,” quips Colleen. They have selected for calving ease and high maternal values in the bulls they have used for A.I.ing. Their cowherd carries a heavy percentage of Freightliner, Expectation 4915, and New Frontier 095 daughters.

Last year they used homegrown bulls and are really pleased with the results. “I like the calves and I didn’t have to mess around with all the work of A.I.ing,” grins Harley.

The replacement heifers, also matronly, feminine, and moderate framed, were bred to yearling, homegrown bulls, with the exception of two yearling bulls that were purchased. The young bulls held their flesh and grew well during the breeding season, once again showing the good forage conversion Rounds have been striving for. The heifers graze in a rough pasture with steep hillsides and rugged draws to travel to get to water. Besides the home raised heifers, there are a few heifers Todd purchased from Lunds B Bar Angus as well.

“This year I bought a few straws of semen of two bulls from Scotland and used them early on 30 head,” says Harley. “I’m sure looking forward to those calves to see what they look like.”

Harley and Colleen like the qualities these fresh genetics offer for carcass performance, high grass conversion, maternal superiority and easy calving. The potential hybrid vigor offered by the complete genetic outcross is also exciting.

The two bulls, imported by Genex, are pure Scottish Aberdeen Angus. Jipsey Earl and Cortachy Boy sport 78 pound and 73 pound birthweights, respectively. The cattle are noted for being moderate framed with a wide base, high feed conversion, shorter gestation, and superior females. Harley adds, “They are so wide that they leave two trails when they walk, instead of a regular cow trail.”

Harley and Colleen, who is postmaster at Union Center, have been married 38 years, and have two grown children. Daughter Amy and husband Chato Edoff live near Fairfax, SD and their seven children are Sidney, 14, Trae, 10, Thyme, 9, True, 7, Lando, 5, Treat, 2, and Laken, 1. Amy works at Devine Concrete in Bonesteel, and Chato runs a bootshop there.

Son Todd and his wife Sarah have two boys, Troy, 9, and Sam, 6, and live on the home ranch. Their boys are the sixth generation on the ranch that was homesteaded by Harley’s grandparents in 1908. Todd works shifts in the Black Thunder Coal Mine near Wright, WY, and spends his off days working with his folks on the ranch.

They use Quarter Horses for their cow work and A.I.ing, and the saddle string is ready for a rest once that is done.

It’s not all work and no play for Harley and Colleen, though. Harley enjoys getting his favorite motorcycle, a Harley Davidson, out and cruising the Black Hills and beyond.

Weaning time is fast approaching, as the bull calves and heifer replacements will be brought in, weighed and weaned mid-September. The other calves will be sold off of the cows in mid-October.

“Last year our bull calves had an adjusted 205 day weight of 691 pounds, with nothing but grass and water,” says Harley. When they are weaned, they are fed hay and a product from Scranton, ND, called “Bull Developer.” It’s a grain-based pellet with no corn in it. Harley says, “They do really well on it. They eat it good and start eating it right off at weaning.”

Once weaned, the bull calves are turned into a rough pasture with high hills to climb, draws to cross, and plenty of grass to graze. They are fed the “Bull Developer” pellets until they are sold in the spring. The bulls grow up with sound feet and legs, are fit and ready to go to work when they are turned with cows as yearlings, and stay sound and healthy for a long time, which is a bonus for the commercial cowman that buys them.

The Rounds sell the bulls private treaty at the ranch, with the opportunity for the buyer to really study them, handle them, and compare them as individuals. There’s no baby-fat or bad feet to sort through, and bad attitude has already been eliminated through culling. The bulls stay at the ranch if the buyer prefers, and Harley delivers them later in the spring.

Harley and Colleen just plan on keeping on with the program, focusing on maternal qualities and improving grass conversion. As to what bloodlines they will pursue, Harley says, “We’ve still got some Freightliner semen that we’re using carefully, making it last. I see some new bulls in the Angus that I might try too.” He adds, “If we like the calves by the Scottish bulls we may go with more of them.”

Rounds Angus raises practical, rancher cattle that fit the hard grass prairie of the northern plains. The cattle have adapted to the country, as have the people. As Harley and Colleen have done, Todd and his family are doing what it takes to stay on the ranch. The good black cows will surely graze the rugged hills and another generation of Rounds will be watching over them for many years to come.

The cow/calf pairs are scattered from the creek bottoms to the slopes of the high ridges. Big, muscular bull calves stand up high against their mothers’ sides, shoving them as they nurse. Still big babies, they already exhibit very mature characteristics, with muscular quarters, broad backs, masculine heads and well-developed scrotums. The heifer calves are mirror images of their mothers; deep flanked and long-bodied with a feminine head. The calves were born starting mid-February and are glossy fat on the summer grass.

The cows are very uniform, moderate in size and all have excellent udders. Though purebreds and raising future commercial herd sires, they are run strictly as range cows. They thrive on grass and are supplemented with hay in the winter. That’s just the way Harley Rounds likes it – the less fuss, the better.

Rounds Angus, 17 miles northwest of Union Center, SD, is off the beaten path, but worth the drive to see the cattle in their working clothes. Harley and Colleen Rounds have been in the purebred business for 38 years, and in the Angus business for 19 of them. They started in the purebred business in 1971 with Simmentals.

In the spring of 1990 they bought their first Angus cows from Bruce Sedman of Henry, NE. The cows carried the blood of such bulls as Cast Iron and Mr. Angus. They were older cow/calf pairs and they bred them back to a polled black Simmental bull they had purchased with the intent of breeding up to purebred, black Simmentals.

That fall, when they weaned those purebred Angus calves, they were really impressed with everything about them. They sold the Simmental bull and went after more Angus cows. The next spring they started A.I.ing to Angus bulls.

They added some more cows from Lund’s B Bar Angus of Wibaux, MT, mostly daughters of Rope. These cows raised really good calves and, like the other Angus cows, were easier to maintain. The next year, they bought more B Bar heifers, plus some from Medicine Rocks Angus of Ekalaka, MT. The third year, they bought a few more heifers from the Mehlings at Medicine Rocks. Their Angus cowherd was firmly established.

The Simmental cows were slowly phased out during those years, until the Rounds had only the top end, red cows left of them.

The spring of 1997 made them take a hard look at the Simmental cows. Harley says, “We had that big storm and the Angus cows got along okay. The red cows were really disoriented by it, couldn’t find their calves, and really had trouble.”

That eye-opening experience, with the two breeds running together, finally convinced them to focus on the Angus. In 1998 the last of the red cows were sold.

Today, there are a handful of black, Simmental cross cows still in the cowherd.

“We have a guy that wants the Angus/Simmental cross bulls, so I try to raise a few,” says Harley. These cows are only distinguished from the Angus by the white marking on their heads, as they are the same size and frame.

Low maintainance cows are the goal. The less the Rounds have to do for them, the better. The cows harvest the native grass and convert it into ample milk, all the while climbing steep ridges, sliding off of the banks of draws and covering the country easy. They maintain their body condition without supplements of any kind, and breed back on time, with a short calving period.

Calving ease is also required. They simply don’t want to pull calves. “I don’t miss that,” quips Colleen. They have selected for calving ease and high maternal values in the bulls they have used for A.I.ing. Their cowherd carries a heavy percentage of Freightliner, Expectation 4915, and New Frontier 095 daughters.

Last year they used homegrown bulls and are really pleased with the results. “I like the calves and I didn’t have to mess around with all the work of A.I.ing,” grins Harley.

The replacement heifers, also matronly, feminine, and moderate framed, were bred to yearling, homegrown bulls, with the exception of two yearling bulls that were purchased. The young bulls held their flesh and grew well during the breeding season, once again showing the good forage conversion Rounds have been striving for. The heifers graze in a rough pasture with steep hillsides and rugged draws to travel to get to water. Besides the home raised heifers, there are a few heifers Todd purchased from Lunds B Bar Angus as well.

“This year I bought a few straws of semen of two bulls from Scotland and used them early on 30 head,” says Harley. “I’m sure looking forward to those calves to see what they look like.”

Harley and Colleen like the qualities these fresh genetics offer for carcass performance, high grass conversion, maternal superiority and easy calving. The potential hybrid vigor offered by the complete genetic outcross is also exciting.

The two bulls, imported by Genex, are pure Scottish Aberdeen Angus. Jipsey Earl and Cortachy Boy sport 78 pound and 73 pound birthweights, respectively. The cattle are noted for being moderate framed with a wide base, high feed conversion, shorter gestation, and superior females. Harley adds, “They are so wide that they leave two trails when they walk, instead of a regular cow trail.”

Harley and Colleen, who is postmaster at Union Center, have been married 38 years, and have two grown children. Daughter Amy and husband Chato Edoff live near Fairfax, SD and their seven children are Sidney, 14, Trae, 10, Thyme, 9, True, 7, Lando, 5, Treat, 2, and Laken, 1. Amy works at Devine Concrete in Bonesteel, and Chato runs a bootshop there.

Son Todd and his wife Sarah have two boys, Troy, 9, and Sam, 6, and live on the home ranch. Their boys are the sixth generation on the ranch that was homesteaded by Harley’s grandparents in 1908. Todd works shifts in the Black Thunder Coal Mine near Wright, WY, and spends his off days working with his folks on the ranch.

They use Quarter Horses for their cow work and A.I.ing, and the saddle string is ready for a rest once that is done.

It’s not all work and no play for Harley and Colleen, though. Harley enjoys getting his favorite motorcycle, a Harley Davidson, out and cruising the Black Hills and beyond.

Weaning time is fast approaching, as the bull calves and heifer replacements will be brought in, weighed and weaned mid-September. The other calves will be sold off of the cows in mid-October.

“Last year our bull calves had an adjusted 205 day weight of 691 pounds, with nothing but grass and water,” says Harley. When they are weaned, they are fed hay and a product from Scranton, ND, called “Bull Developer.” It’s a grain-based pellet with no corn in it. Harley says, “They do really well on it. They eat it good and start eating it right off at weaning.”

Once weaned, the bull calves are turned into a rough pasture with high hills to climb, draws to cross, and plenty of grass to graze. They are fed the “Bull Developer” pellets until they are sold in the spring. The bulls grow up with sound feet and legs, are fit and ready to go to work when they are turned with cows as yearlings, and stay sound and healthy for a long time, which is a bonus for the commercial cowman that buys them.

The Rounds sell the bulls private treaty at the ranch, with the opportunity for the buyer to really study them, handle them, and compare them as individuals. There’s no baby-fat or bad feet to sort through, and bad attitude has already been eliminated through culling. The bulls stay at the ranch if the buyer prefers, and Harley delivers them later in the spring.

Harley and Colleen just plan on keeping on with the program, focusing on maternal qualities and improving grass conversion. As to what bloodlines they will pursue, Harley says, “We’ve still got some Freightliner semen that we’re using carefully, making it last. I see some new bulls in the Angus that I might try too.” He adds, “If we like the calves by the Scottish bulls we may go with more of them.”

Rounds Angus raises practical, rancher cattle that fit the hard grass prairie of the northern plains. The cattle have adapted to the country, as have the people. As Harley and Colleen have done, Todd and his family are doing what it takes to stay on the ranch. The good black cows will surely graze the rugged hills and another generation of Rounds will be watching over them for many years to come.

The cow/calf pairs are scattered from the creek bottoms to the slopes of the high ridges. Big, muscular bull calves stand up high against their mothers’ sides, shoving them as they nurse. Still big babies, they already exhibit very mature characteristics, with muscular quarters, broad backs, masculine heads and well-developed scrotums. The heifer calves are mirror images of their mothers; deep flanked and long-bodied with a feminine head. The calves were born starting mid-February and are glossy fat on the summer grass.

The cows are very uniform, moderate in size and all have excellent udders. Though purebreds and raising future commercial herd sires, they are run strictly as range cows. They thrive on grass and are supplemented with hay in the winter. That’s just the way Harley Rounds likes it – the less fuss, the better.

Rounds Angus, 17 miles northwest of Union Center, SD, is off the beaten path, but worth the drive to see the cattle in their working clothes. Harley and Colleen Rounds have been in the purebred business for 38 years, and in the Angus business for 19 of them. They started in the purebred business in 1971 with Simmentals.

In the spring of 1990 they bought their first Angus cows from Bruce Sedman of Henry, NE. The cows carried the blood of such bulls as Cast Iron and Mr. Angus. They were older cow/calf pairs and they bred them back to a polled black Simmental bull they had purchased with the intent of breeding up to purebred, black Simmentals.

That fall, when they weaned those purebred Angus calves, they were really impressed with everything about them. They sold the Simmental bull and went after more Angus cows. The next spring they started A.I.ing to Angus bulls.

They added some more cows from Lund’s B Bar Angus of Wibaux, MT, mostly daughters of Rope. These cows raised really good calves and, like the other Angus cows, were easier to maintain. The next year, they bought more B Bar heifers, plus some from Medicine Rocks Angus of Ekalaka, MT. The third year, they bought a few more heifers from the Mehlings at Medicine Rocks. Their Angus cowherd was firmly established.

The Simmental cows were slowly phased out during those years, until the Rounds had only the top end, red cows left of them.

The spring of 1997 made them take a hard look at the Simmental cows. Harley says, “We had that big storm and the Angus cows got along okay. The red cows were really disoriented by it, couldn’t find their calves, and really had trouble.”

That eye-opening experience, with the two breeds running together, finally convinced them to focus on the Angus. In 1998 the last of the red cows were sold.

Today, there are a handful of black, Simmental cross cows still in the cowherd.

“We have a guy that wants the Angus/Simmental cross bulls, so I try to raise a few,” says Harley. These cows are only distinguished from the Angus by the white marking on their heads, as they are the same size and frame.

Low maintainance cows are the goal. The less the Rounds have to do for them, the better. The cows harvest the native grass and convert it into ample milk, all the while climbing steep ridges, sliding off of the banks of draws and covering the country easy. They maintain their body condition without supplements of any kind, and breed back on time, with a short calving period.

Calving ease is also required. They simply don’t want to pull calves. “I don’t miss that,” quips Colleen. They have selected for calving ease and high maternal values in the bulls they have used for A.I.ing. Their cowherd carries a heavy percentage of Freightliner, Expectation 4915, and New Frontier 095 daughters.

Last year they used homegrown bulls and are really pleased with the results. “I like the calves and I didn’t have to mess around with all the work of A.I.ing,” grins Harley.

The replacement heifers, also matronly, feminine, and moderate framed, were bred to yearling, homegrown bulls, with the exception of two yearling bulls that were purchased. The young bulls held their flesh and grew well during the breeding season, once again showing the good forage conversion Rounds have been striving for. The heifers graze in a rough pasture with steep hillsides and rugged draws to travel to get to water. Besides the home raised heifers, there are a few heifers Todd purchased from Lunds B Bar Angus as well.

“This year I bought a few straws of semen of two bulls from Scotland and used them early on 30 head,” says Harley. “I’m sure looking forward to those calves to see what they look like.”

Harley and Colleen like the qualities these fresh genetics offer for carcass performance, high grass conversion, maternal superiority and easy calving. The potential hybrid vigor offered by the complete genetic outcross is also exciting.

The two bulls, imported by Genex, are pure Scottish Aberdeen Angus. Jipsey Earl and Cortachy Boy sport 78 pound and 73 pound birthweights, respectively. The cattle are noted for being moderate framed with a wide base, high feed conversion, shorter gestation, and superior females. Harley adds, “They are so wide that they leave two trails when they walk, instead of a regular cow trail.”

Harley and Colleen, who is postmaster at Union Center, have been married 38 years, and have two grown children. Daughter Amy and husband Chato Edoff live near Fairfax, SD and their seven children are Sidney, 14, Trae, 10, Thyme, 9, True, 7, Lando, 5, Treat, 2, and Laken, 1. Amy works at Devine Concrete in Bonesteel, and Chato runs a bootshop there.

Son Todd and his wife Sarah have two boys, Troy, 9, and Sam, 6, and live on the home ranch. Their boys are the sixth generation on the ranch that was homesteaded by Harley’s grandparents in 1908. Todd works shifts in the Black Thunder Coal Mine near Wright, WY, and spends his off days working with his folks on the ranch.

They use Quarter Horses for their cow work and A.I.ing, and the saddle string is ready for a rest once that is done.

It’s not all work and no play for Harley and Colleen, though. Harley enjoys getting his favorite motorcycle, a Harley Davidson, out and cruising the Black Hills and beyond.

Weaning time is fast approaching, as the bull calves and heifer replacements will be brought in, weighed and weaned mid-September. The other calves will be sold off of the cows in mid-October.

“Last year our bull calves had an adjusted 205 day weight of 691 pounds, with nothing but grass and water,” says Harley. When they are weaned, they are fed hay and a product from Scranton, ND, called “Bull Developer.” It’s a grain-based pellet with no corn in it. Harley says, “They do really well on it. They eat it good and start eating it right off at weaning.”

Once weaned, the bull calves are turned into a rough pasture with high hills to climb, draws to cross, and plenty of grass to graze. They are fed the “Bull Developer” pellets until they are sold in the spring. The bulls grow up with sound feet and legs, are fit and ready to go to work when they are turned with cows as yearlings, and stay sound and healthy for a long time, which is a bonus for the commercial cowman that buys them.

The Rounds sell the bulls private treaty at the ranch, with the opportunity for the buyer to really study them, handle them, and compare them as individuals. There’s no baby-fat or bad feet to sort through, and bad attitude has already been eliminated through culling. The bulls stay at the ranch if the buyer prefers, and Harley delivers them later in the spring.

Harley and Colleen just plan on keeping on with the program, focusing on maternal qualities and improving grass conversion. As to what bloodlines they will pursue, Harley says, “We’ve still got some Freightliner semen that we’re using carefully, making it last. I see some new bulls in the Angus that I might try too.” He adds, “If we like the calves by the Scottish bulls we may go with more of them.”

Rounds Angus raises practical, rancher cattle that fit the hard grass prairie of the northern plains. The cattle have adapted to the country, as have the people. As Harley and Colleen have done, Todd and his family are doing what it takes to stay on the ranch. The good black cows will surely graze the rugged hills and another generation of Rounds will be watching over them for many years to come.

The cow/calf pairs are scattered from the creek bottoms to the slopes of the high ridges. Big, muscular bull calves stand up high against their mothers’ sides, shoving them as they nurse. Still big babies, they already exhibit very mature characteristics, with muscular quarters, broad backs, masculine heads and well-developed scrotums. The heifer calves are mirror images of their mothers; deep flanked and long-bodied with a feminine head. The calves were born starting mid-February and are glossy fat on the summer grass.

The cows are very uniform, moderate in size and all have excellent udders. Though purebreds and raising future commercial herd sires, they are run strictly as range cows. They thrive on grass and are supplemented with hay in the winter. That’s just the way Harley Rounds likes it – the less fuss, the better.

Rounds Angus, 17 miles northwest of Union Center, SD, is off the beaten path, but worth the drive to see the cattle in their working clothes. Harley and Colleen Rounds have been in the purebred business for 38 years, and in the Angus business for 19 of them. They started in the purebred business in 1971 with Simmentals.

In the spring of 1990 they bought their first Angus cows from Bruce Sedman of Henry, NE. The cows carried the blood of such bulls as Cast Iron and Mr. Angus. They were older cow/calf pairs and they bred them back to a polled black Simmental bull they had purchased with the intent of breeding up to purebred, black Simmentals.

That fall, when they weaned those purebred Angus calves, they were really impressed with everything about them. They sold the Simmental bull and went after more Angus cows. The next spring they started A.I.ing to Angus bulls.

They added some more cows from Lund’s B Bar Angus of Wibaux, MT, mostly daughters of Rope. These cows raised really good calves and, like the other Angus cows, were easier to maintain. The next year, they bought more B Bar heifers, plus some from Medicine Rocks Angus of Ekalaka, MT. The third year, they bought a few more heifers from the Mehlings at Medicine Rocks. Their Angus cowherd was firmly established.

The Simmental cows were slowly phased out during those years, until the Rounds had only the top end, red cows left of them.

The spring of 1997 made them take a hard look at the Simmental cows. Harley says, “We had that big storm and the Angus cows got along okay. The red cows were really disoriented by it, couldn’t find their calves, and really had trouble.”

That eye-opening experience, with the two breeds running together, finally convinced them to focus on the Angus. In 1998 the last of the red cows were sold.

Today, there are a handful of black, Simmental cross cows still in the cowherd.

“We have a guy that wants the Angus/Simmental cross bulls, so I try to raise a few,” says Harley. These cows are only distinguished from the Angus by the white marking on their heads, as they are the same size and frame.

Low maintainance cows are the goal. The less the Rounds have to do for them, the better. The cows harvest the native grass and convert it into ample milk, all the while climbing steep ridges, sliding off of the banks of draws and covering the country easy. They maintain their body condition without supplements of any kind, and breed back on time, with a short calving period.

Calving ease is also required. They simply don’t want to pull calves. “I don’t miss that,” quips Colleen. They have selected for calving ease and high maternal values in the bulls they have used for A.I.ing. Their cowherd carries a heavy percentage of Freightliner, Expectation 4915, and New Frontier 095 daughters.

Last year they used homegrown bulls and are really pleased with the results. “I like the calves and I didn’t have to mess around with all the work of A.I.ing,” grins Harley.

The replacement heifers, also matronly, feminine, and moderate framed, were bred to yearling, homegrown bulls, with the exception of two yearling bulls that were purchased. The young bulls held their flesh and grew well during the breeding season, once again showing the good forage conversion Rounds have been striving for. The heifers graze in a rough pasture with steep hillsides and rugged draws to travel to get to water. Besides the home raised heifers, there are a few heifers Todd purchased from Lunds B Bar Angus as well.

“This year I bought a few straws of semen of two bulls from Scotland and used them early on 30 head,” says Harley. “I’m sure looking forward to those calves to see what they look like.”

Harley and Colleen like the qualities these fresh genetics offer for carcass performance, high grass conversion, maternal superiority and easy calving. The potential hybrid vigor offered by the complete genetic outcross is also exciting.

The two bulls, imported by Genex, are pure Scottish Aberdeen Angus. Jipsey Earl and Cortachy Boy sport 78 pound and 73 pound birthweights, respectively. The cattle are noted for being moderate framed with a wide base, high feed conversion, shorter gestation, and superior females. Harley adds, “They are so wide that they leave two trails when they walk, instead of a regular cow trail.”

Harley and Colleen, who is postmaster at Union Center, have been married 38 years, and have two grown children. Daughter Amy and husband Chato Edoff live near Fairfax, SD and their seven children are Sidney, 14, Trae, 10, Thyme, 9, True, 7, Lando, 5, Treat, 2, and Laken, 1. Amy works at Devine Concrete in Bonesteel, and Chato runs a bootshop there.

Son Todd and his wife Sarah have two boys, Troy, 9, and Sam, 6, and live on the home ranch. Their boys are the sixth generation on the ranch that was homesteaded by Harley’s grandparents in 1908. Todd works shifts in the Black Thunder Coal Mine near Wright, WY, and spends his off days working with his folks on the ranch.

They use Quarter Horses for their cow work and A.I.ing, and the saddle string is ready for a rest once that is done.

It’s not all work and no play for Harley and Colleen, though. Harley enjoys getting his favorite motorcycle, a Harley Davidson, out and cruising the Black Hills and beyond.

Weaning time is fast approaching, as the bull calves and heifer replacements will be brought in, weighed and weaned mid-September. The other calves will be sold off of the cows in mid-October.

“Last year our bull calves had an adjusted 205 day weight of 691 pounds, with nothing but grass and water,” says Harley. When they are weaned, they are fed hay and a product from Scranton, ND, called “Bull Developer.” It’s a grain-based pellet with no corn in it. Harley says, “They do really well on it. They eat it good and start eating it right off at weaning.”

Once weaned, the bull calves are turned into a rough pasture with high hills to climb, draws to cross, and plenty of grass to graze. They are fed the “Bull Developer” pellets until they are sold in the spring. The bulls grow up with sound feet and legs, are fit and ready to go to work when they are turned with cows as yearlings, and stay sound and healthy for a long time, which is a bonus for the commercial cowman that buys them.

The Rounds sell the bulls private treaty at the ranch, with the opportunity for the buyer to really study them, handle them, and compare them as individuals. There’s no baby-fat or bad feet to sort through, and bad attitude has already been eliminated through culling. The bulls stay at the ranch if the buyer prefers, and Harley delivers them later in the spring.

Harley and Colleen just plan on keeping on with the program, focusing on maternal qualities and improving grass conversion. As to what bloodlines they will pursue, Harley says, “We’ve still got some Freightliner semen that we’re using carefully, making it last. I see some new bulls in the Angus that I might try too.” He adds, “If we like the calves by the Scottish bulls we may go with more of them.”

Rounds Angus raises practical, rancher cattle that fit the hard grass prairie of the northern plains. The cattle have adapted to the country, as have the people. As Harley and Colleen have done, Todd and his family are doing what it takes to stay on the ranch. The good black cows will surely graze the rugged hills and another generation of Rounds will be watching over them for many years to come.

The cow/calf pairs are scattered from the creek bottoms to the slopes of the high ridges. Big, muscular bull calves stand up high against their mothers’ sides, shoving them as they nurse. Still big babies, they already exhibit very mature characteristics, with muscular quarters, broad backs, masculine heads and well-developed scrotums. The heifer calves are mirror images of their mothers; deep flanked and long-bodied with a feminine head. The calves were born starting mid-February and are glossy fat on the summer grass.

The cows are very uniform, moderate in size and all have excellent udders. Though purebreds and raising future commercial herd sires, they are run strictly as range cows. They thrive on grass and are supplemented with hay in the winter. That’s just the way Harley Rounds likes it – the less fuss, the better.

Rounds Angus, 17 miles northwest of Union Center, SD, is off the beaten path, but worth the drive to see the cattle in their working clothes. Harley and Colleen Rounds have been in the purebred business for 38 years, and in the Angus business for 19 of them. They started in the purebred business in 1971 with Simmentals.

In the spring of 1990 they bought their first Angus cows from Bruce Sedman of Henry, NE. The cows carried the blood of such bulls as Cast Iron and Mr. Angus. They were older cow/calf pairs and they bred them back to a polled black Simmental bull they had purchased with the intent of breeding up to purebred, black Simmentals.

That fall, when they weaned those purebred Angus calves, they were really impressed with everything about them. They sold the Simmental bull and went after more Angus cows. The next spring they started A.I.ing to Angus bulls.

They added some more cows from Lund’s B Bar Angus of Wibaux, MT, mostly daughters of Rope. These cows raised really good calves and, like the other Angus cows, were easier to maintain. The next year, they bought more B Bar heifers, plus some from Medicine Rocks Angus of Ekalaka, MT. The third year, they bought a few more heifers from the Mehlings at Medicine Rocks. Their Angus cowherd was firmly established.

The Simmental cows were slowly phased out during those years, until the Rounds had only the top end, red cows left of them.

The spring of 1997 made them take a hard look at the Simmental cows. Harley says, “We had that big storm and the Angus cows got along okay. The red cows were really disoriented by it, couldn’t find their calves, and really had trouble.”

That eye-opening experience, with the two breeds running together, finally convinced them to focus on the Angus. In 1998 the last of the red cows were sold.

Today, there are a handful of black, Simmental cross cows still in the cowherd.

“We have a guy that wants the Angus/Simmental cross bulls, so I try to raise a few,” says Harley. These cows are only distinguished from the Angus by the white marking on their heads, as they are the same size and frame.

Low maintainance cows are the goal. The less the Rounds have to do for them, the better. The cows harvest the native grass and convert it into ample milk, all the while climbing steep ridges, sliding off of the banks of draws and covering the country easy. They maintain their body condition without supplements of any kind, and breed back on time, with a short calving period.

Calving ease is also required. They simply don’t want to pull calves. “I don’t miss that,” quips Colleen. They have selected for calving ease and high maternal values in the bulls they have used for A.I.ing. Their cowherd carries a heavy percentage of Freightliner, Expectation 4915, and New Frontier 095 daughters.

Last year they used homegrown bulls and are really pleased with the results. “I like the calves and I didn’t have to mess around with all the work of A.I.ing,” grins Harley.

The replacement heifers, also matronly, feminine, and moderate framed, were bred to yearling, homegrown bulls, with the exception of two yearling bulls that were purchased. The young bulls held their flesh and grew well during the breeding season, once again showing the good forage conversion Rounds have been striving for. The heifers graze in a rough pasture with steep hillsides and rugged draws to travel to get to water. Besides the home raised heifers, there are a few heifers Todd purchased from Lunds B Bar Angus as well.

“This year I bought a few straws of semen of two bulls from Scotland and used them early on 30 head,” says Harley. “I’m sure looking forward to those calves to see what they look like.”

Harley and Colleen like the qualities these fresh genetics offer for carcass performance, high grass conversion, maternal superiority and easy calving. The potential hybrid vigor offered by the complete genetic outcross is also exciting.

The two bulls, imported by Genex, are pure Scottish Aberdeen Angus. Jipsey Earl and Cortachy Boy sport 78 pound and 73 pound birthweights, respectively. The cattle are noted for being moderate framed with a wide base, high feed conversion, shorter gestation, and superior females. Harley adds, “They are so wide that they leave two trails when they walk, instead of a regular cow trail.”

Harley and Colleen, who is postmaster at Union Center, have been married 38 years, and have two grown children. Daughter Amy and husband Chato Edoff live near Fairfax, SD and their seven children are Sidney, 14, Trae, 10, Thyme, 9, True, 7, Lando, 5, Treat, 2, and Laken, 1. Amy works at Devine Concrete in Bonesteel, and Chato runs a bootshop there.

Son Todd and his wife Sarah have two boys, Troy, 9, and Sam, 6, and live on the home ranch. Their boys are the sixth generation on the ranch that was homesteaded by Harley’s grandparents in 1908. Todd works shifts in the Black Thunder Coal Mine near Wright, WY, and spends his off days working with his folks on the ranch.

They use Quarter Horses for their cow work and A.I.ing, and the saddle string is ready for a rest once that is done.

It’s not all work and no play for Harley and Colleen, though. Harley enjoys getting his favorite motorcycle, a Harley Davidson, out and cruising the Black Hills and beyond.

Weaning time is fast approaching, as the bull calves and heifer replacements will be brought in, weighed and weaned mid-September. The other calves will be sold off of the cows in mid-October.

“Last year our bull calves had an adjusted 205 day weight of 691 pounds, with nothing but grass and water,” says Harley. When they are weaned, they are fed hay and a product from Scranton, ND, called “Bull Developer.” It’s a grain-based pellet with no corn in it. Harley says, “They do really well on it. They eat it good and start eating it right off at weaning.”

Once weaned, the bull calves are turned into a rough pasture with high hills to climb, draws to cross, and plenty of grass to graze. They are fed the “Bull Developer” pellets until they are sold in the spring. The bulls grow up with sound feet and legs, are fit and ready to go to work when they are turned with cows as yearlings, and stay sound and healthy for a long time, which is a bonus for the commercial cowman that buys them.

The Rounds sell the bulls private treaty at the ranch, with the opportunity for the buyer to really study them, handle them, and compare them as individuals. There’s no baby-fat or bad feet to sort through, and bad attitude has already been eliminated through culling. The bulls stay at the ranch if the buyer prefers, and Harley delivers them later in the spring.

Harley and Colleen just plan on keeping on with the program, focusing on maternal qualities and improving grass conversion. As to what bloodlines they will pursue, Harley says, “We’ve still got some Freightliner semen that we’re using carefully, making it last. I see some new bulls in the Angus that I might try too.” He adds, “If we like the calves by the Scottish bulls we may go with more of them.”

Rounds Angus raises practical, rancher cattle that fit the hard grass prairie of the northern plains. The cattle have adapted to the country, as have the people. As Harley and Colleen have done, Todd and his family are doing what it takes to stay on the ranch. The good black cows will surely graze the rugged hills and another generation of Rounds will be watching over them for many years to come.

The cow/calf pairs are scattered from the creek bottoms to the slopes of the high ridges. Big, muscular bull calves stand up high against their mothers’ sides, shoving them as they nurse. Still big babies, they already exhibit very mature characteristics, with muscular quarters, broad backs, masculine heads and well-developed scrotums. The heifer calves are mirror images of their mothers; deep flanked and long-bodied with a feminine head. The calves were born starting mid-February and are glossy fat on the summer grass.

The cows are very uniform, moderate in size and all have excellent udders. Though purebreds and raising future commercial herd sires, they are run strictly as range cows. They thrive on grass and are supplemented with hay in the winter. That’s just the way Harley Rounds likes it – the less fuss, the better.

Rounds Angus, 17 miles northwest of Union Center, SD, is off the beaten path, but worth the drive to see the cattle in their working clothes. Harley and Colleen Rounds have been in the purebred business for 38 years, and in the Angus business for 19 of them. They started in the purebred business in 1971 with Simmentals.

In the spring of 1990 they bought their first Angus cows from Bruce Sedman of Henry, NE. The cows carried the blood of such bulls as Cast Iron and Mr. Angus. They were older cow/calf pairs and they bred them back to a polled black Simmental bull they had purchased with the intent of breeding up to purebred, black Simmentals.

That fall, when they weaned those purebred Angus calves, they were really impressed with everything about them. They sold the Simmental bull and went after more Angus cows. The next spring they started A.I.ing to Angus bulls.

They added some more cows from Lund’s B Bar Angus of Wibaux, MT, mostly daughters of Rope. These cows raised really good calves and, like the other Angus cows, were easier to maintain. The next year, they bought more B Bar heifers, plus some from Medicine Rocks Angus of Ekalaka, MT. The third year, they bought a few more heifers from the Mehlings at Medicine Rocks. Their Angus cowherd was firmly established.

The Simmental cows were slowly phased out during those years, until the Rounds had only the top end, red cows left of them.

The spring of 1997 made them take a hard look at the Simmental cows. Harley says, “We had that big storm and the Angus cows got along okay. The red cows were really disoriented by it, couldn’t find their calves, and really had trouble.”

That eye-opening experience, with the two breeds running together, finally convinced them to focus on the Angus. In 1998 the last of the red cows were sold.

Today, there are a handful of black, Simmental cross cows still in the cowherd.

“We have a guy that wants the Angus/Simmental cross bulls, so I try to raise a few,” says Harley. These cows are only distinguished from the Angus by the white marking on their heads, as they are the same size and frame.

Low maintainance cows are the goal. The less the Rounds have to do for them, the better. The cows harvest the native grass and convert it into ample milk, all the while climbing steep ridges, sliding off of the banks of draws and covering the country easy. They maintain their body condition without supplements of any kind, and breed back on time, with a short calving period.

Calving ease is also required. They simply don’t want to pull calves. “I don’t miss that,” quips Colleen. They have selected for calving ease and high maternal values in the bulls they have used for A.I.ing. Their cowherd carries a heavy percentage of Freightliner, Expectation 4915, and New Frontier 095 daughters.

Last year they used homegrown bulls and are really pleased with the results. “I like the calves and I didn’t have to mess around with all the work of A.I.ing,” grins Harley.

The replacement heifers, also matronly, feminine, and moderate framed, were bred to yearling, homegrown bulls, with the exception of two yearling bulls that were purchased. The young bulls held their flesh and grew well during the breeding season, once again showing the good forage conversion Rounds have been striving for. The heifers graze in a rough pasture with steep hillsides and rugged draws to travel to get to water. Besides the home raised heifers, there are a few heifers Todd purchased from Lunds B Bar Angus as well.

“This year I bought a few straws of semen of two bulls from Scotland and used them early on 30 head,” says Harley. “I’m sure looking forward to those calves to see what they look like.”

Harley and Colleen like the qualities these fresh genetics offer for carcass performance, high grass conversion, maternal superiority and easy calving. The potential hybrid vigor offered by the complete genetic outcross is also exciting.

The two bulls, imported by Genex, are pure Scottish Aberdeen Angus. Jipsey Earl and Cortachy Boy sport 78 pound and 73 pound birthweights, respectively. The cattle are noted for being moderate framed with a wide base, high feed conversion, shorter gestation, and superior females. Harley adds, “They are so wide that they leave two trails when they walk, instead of a regular cow trail.”

Harley and Colleen, who is postmaster at Union Center, have been married 38 years, and have two grown children. Daughter Amy and husband Chato Edoff live near Fairfax, SD and their seven children are Sidney, 14, Trae, 10, Thyme, 9, True, 7, Lando, 5, Treat, 2, and Laken, 1. Amy works at Devine Concrete in Bonesteel, and Chato runs a bootshop there.

Son Todd and his wife Sarah have two boys, Troy, 9, and Sam, 6, and live on the home ranch. Their boys are the sixth generation on the ranch that was homesteaded by Harley’s grandparents in 1908. Todd works shifts in the Black Thunder Coal Mine near Wright, WY, and spends his off days working with his folks on the ranch.

They use Quarter Horses for their cow work and A.I.ing, and the saddle string is ready for a rest once that is done.

It’s not all work and no play for Harley and Colleen, though. Harley enjoys getting his favorite motorcycle, a Harley Davidson, out and cruising the Black Hills and beyond.

Weaning time is fast approaching, as the bull calves and heifer replacements will be brought in, weighed and weaned mid-September. The other calves will be sold off of the cows in mid-October.

“Last year our bull calves had an adjusted 205 day weight of 691 pounds, with nothing but grass and water,” says Harley. When they are weaned, they are fed hay and a product from Scranton, ND, called “Bull Developer.” It’s a grain-based pellet with no corn in it. Harley says, “They do really well on it. They eat it good and start eating it right off at weaning.”

Once weaned, the bull calves are turned into a rough pasture with high hills to climb, draws to cross, and plenty of grass to graze. They are fed the “Bull Developer” pellets until they are sold in the spring. The bulls grow up with sound feet and legs, are fit and ready to go to work when they are turned with cows as yearlings, and stay sound and healthy for a long time, which is a bonus for the commercial cowman that buys them.

The Rounds sell the bulls private treaty at the ranch, with the opportunity for the buyer to really study them, handle them, and compare them as individuals. There’s no baby-fat or bad feet to sort through, and bad attitude has already been eliminated through culling. The bulls stay at the ranch if the buyer prefers, and Harley delivers them later in the spring.

Harley and Colleen just plan on keeping on with the program, focusing on maternal qualities and improving grass conversion. As to what bloodlines they will pursue, Harley says, “We’ve still got some Freightliner semen that we’re using carefully, making it last. I see some new bulls in the Angus that I might try too.” He adds, “If we like the calves by the Scottish bulls we may go with more of them.”

Rounds Angus raises practical, rancher cattle that fit the hard grass prairie of the northern plains. The cattle have adapted to the country, as have the people. As Harley and Colleen have done, Todd and his family are doing what it takes to stay on the ranch. The good black cows will surely graze the rugged hills and another generation of Rounds will be watching over them for many years to come.