The "real farm girl" | TSLN.com

The "real farm girl"

Amanda Nolz

Laura Nielson and her niece, Julie, on the family farm near Hartford, SD.

Laura Nielson is a born and raised cowgirl. She grew up on her family’s farm near Hartford, SD where the Nielsons raise 450 dairy cows, 400 replacement heifers and 3,000 acres of crops. At a young age, Nielson always knew she wanted to be a farmer. She loved being outdoors with the animals more than anything else in the world. Today, this 22-year-old is still on the farm, enjoying her passions for agriculture as she works alongside her dad and uncle at Nielson Farms.

One day, Nielson was looking up farming videos on YouTube. She typed in “farm girl” and discovered a list of videos by a teenage girl impersonating a farm girl, mocking real farm girls everywhere with her pig tails, big accent and far-fetched ideas about the agriculture industry. Nielson was offended by the videos and appalled that tens of thousands of individuals had watched the videos. So last spring, Nielson created “therealfarmgirl” channel on YouTube, an online social video playing network. She aims to post two or three videos per week to help educate the world’s consumers about where their food comes from.

“The way I see it, there are so many different ways to connect with people all over the world through the internet,” said Nielson. “I see so many negative stories about agriculture, and they are usually false. Whether they are about ‘factory farming,’ animal abuse or the risks of RBST in dairies, so many people are disconnected about where their food comes from. My hope is by using the same internet tools as the media, I could connect with people to discuss the negative things they have heard. Even if only one person’s perception on farmers changes, I have accomplished something important.”

Laura Nielson is a born and raised cowgirl. She grew up on her family’s farm near Hartford, SD where the Nielsons raise 450 dairy cows, 400 replacement heifers and 3,000 acres of crops. At a young age, Nielson always knew she wanted to be a farmer. She loved being outdoors with the animals more than anything else in the world. Today, this 22-year-old is still on the farm, enjoying her passions for agriculture as she works alongside her dad and uncle at Nielson Farms.

One day, Nielson was looking up farming videos on YouTube. She typed in “farm girl” and discovered a list of videos by a teenage girl impersonating a farm girl, mocking real farm girls everywhere with her pig tails, big accent and far-fetched ideas about the agriculture industry. Nielson was offended by the videos and appalled that tens of thousands of individuals had watched the videos. So last spring, Nielson created “therealfarmgirl” channel on YouTube, an online social video playing network. She aims to post two or three videos per week to help educate the world’s consumers about where their food comes from.

“The way I see it, there are so many different ways to connect with people all over the world through the internet,” said Nielson. “I see so many negative stories about agriculture, and they are usually false. Whether they are about ‘factory farming,’ animal abuse or the risks of RBST in dairies, so many people are disconnected about where their food comes from. My hope is by using the same internet tools as the media, I could connect with people to discuss the negative things they have heard. Even if only one person’s perception on farmers changes, I have accomplished something important.”

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Laura Nielson is a born and raised cowgirl. She grew up on her family’s farm near Hartford, SD where the Nielsons raise 450 dairy cows, 400 replacement heifers and 3,000 acres of crops. At a young age, Nielson always knew she wanted to be a farmer. She loved being outdoors with the animals more than anything else in the world. Today, this 22-year-old is still on the farm, enjoying her passions for agriculture as she works alongside her dad and uncle at Nielson Farms.

One day, Nielson was looking up farming videos on YouTube. She typed in “farm girl” and discovered a list of videos by a teenage girl impersonating a farm girl, mocking real farm girls everywhere with her pig tails, big accent and far-fetched ideas about the agriculture industry. Nielson was offended by the videos and appalled that tens of thousands of individuals had watched the videos. So last spring, Nielson created “therealfarmgirl” channel on YouTube, an online social video playing network. She aims to post two or three videos per week to help educate the world’s consumers about where their food comes from.

“The way I see it, there are so many different ways to connect with people all over the world through the internet,” said Nielson. “I see so many negative stories about agriculture, and they are usually false. Whether they are about ‘factory farming,’ animal abuse or the risks of RBST in dairies, so many people are disconnected about where their food comes from. My hope is by using the same internet tools as the media, I could connect with people to discuss the negative things they have heard. Even if only one person’s perception on farmers changes, I have accomplished something important.”

view laura’s youtube page at http://www.youtube.com/user/therealfarmgirl