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Transitioning the ranch through the generations

Amanda Nolz

“Getting started is the first step; getting started is the hardest step,” said Heather Gessner, McCook County Extension Educator, in her presentation on estate planning and transitioning the farm and ranch to the next generation at the Ag Women’s Day held in Brookings, SD on June 15, 2010.

“Families discuss which sires to breed the cows to each year, which corn varieties to plant and what jobs need to be tackled on a daily basis, but nobody wants to sit down and talk about what happens after you pass away,” Gessner said.

Because estate planning can be a conversation that runs high on emotions as it discusses how assets will be transitioned to children, it’s often a topic that is avoided among family members. Gessner offered some tips to help facilitate this conversation and avoid conflicts.

“Getting started is the first step; getting started is the hardest step,” said Heather Gessner, McCook County Extension Educator, in her presentation on estate planning and transitioning the farm and ranch to the next generation at the Ag Women’s Day held in Brookings, SD on June 15, 2010.

“Families discuss which sires to breed the cows to each year, which corn varieties to plant and what jobs need to be tackled on a daily basis, but nobody wants to sit down and talk about what happens after you pass away,” Gessner said.

Because estate planning can be a conversation that runs high on emotions as it discusses how assets will be transitioned to children, it’s often a topic that is avoided among family members. Gessner offered some tips to help facilitate this conversation and avoid conflicts.

“Getting started is the first step; getting started is the hardest step,” said Heather Gessner, McCook County Extension Educator, in her presentation on estate planning and transitioning the farm and ranch to the next generation at the Ag Women’s Day held in Brookings, SD on June 15, 2010.

“Families discuss which sires to breed the cows to each year, which corn varieties to plant and what jobs need to be tackled on a daily basis, but nobody wants to sit down and talk about what happens after you pass away,” Gessner said.

Because estate planning can be a conversation that runs high on emotions as it discusses how assets will be transitioned to children, it’s often a topic that is avoided among family members. Gessner offered some tips to help facilitate this conversation and avoid conflicts.


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