UHC continues to compile list of facilities to accept horses | TSLN.com
YOUR AD HERE »

UHC continues to compile list of facilities to accept horses

The Unwanted Horse Coalition (UHC) seeks more facilities that accept, place, or use horses to list themselves on the UHC Web site. Currently, there are over 650 facilities listed. This section of the Web site has proved successful in match making unwanted horses with an available care facility, as well as potential owners with horses available for adoption. With additional facilities listed on the site, the UHC will be able to assist more unwanted horses and horse owners in need.

According to recent national and regional news reports, the number of unwanted horses in the U.S. is rising. The UHC’s 2009 Unwanted Horses Survey found that 39 percent of the country’s equine care facilities are at capacity, with another 30 percent at 75-99 percent capacity. The UHC estimates 170,000 horses are “unwanted” in the U.S. per year. The survey concludes the maximum rate of occupancy for facilities is 18,060, with 11,180 horses being turned away per year.

The resources on the UHC’s Web site are an important bridge between people who are seeking alternatives for their horses and the facilities that are able to accept them. Such facilities include rescue, retirement and retraining facilities; therapeutic riding programs; colleges and universities; police and military organizations; public stables; and government and park service programs.



“The UHC gets daily e-mails regarding owner give ups and potential horse owners seeking to adopt. The larger our online network becomes, the more options become available for horses and horse owners in need. If you are a facility that will help with the care, training and use of these horses, we encourage you to sign on,” said Ericka Caslin, UHC director.

The UHC Web site is set up so that facilities can list themselves easily. Any facility that wishes to be listed can go to the UHC Web site and complete a brief questionnaire. To complete the questionnaire or view the facilities in the directory, go to http://www.unwantedhorsecoalition.org, click “Resources,” follow the link to “Facilities that Accept Horses” and fill out the short questionnaire. Facilities are listed on the UHC site by state. The information sought is intended to advise horse owners about what type of facility it is, contact information, whether it is tax exempt, year founded, horse capacity, number of staff and whether it follows the “Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities,” published by the American Association of Equine Practitioners.



The UHC Web site also has a series of questions that owners should consider when trying to decide on a facility, program or second use for their horse. “These questions will help owners know what options are available and what to look for in a facility. This is a difficult decision for many owners to make and we want to help them make the best one for their horse. There are plenty of horses that need care, training, and a good home. We want horse owners to be aware of the large rescue/retirement facilities with multiple locations as well as the smaller facilities that may serve a local area. They all have an important place in this effort,” said Caslin.

For information about the UHC and its efforts contact Ericka Caslin at ecaslin@horsecouncil.org or 202-296-4031.

The Unwanted Horse Coalition (UHC) seeks more facilities that accept, place, or use horses to list themselves on the UHC Web site. Currently, there are over 650 facilities listed. This section of the Web site has proved successful in match making unwanted horses with an available care facility, as well as potential owners with horses available for adoption. With additional facilities listed on the site, the UHC will be able to assist more unwanted horses and horse owners in need.

According to recent national and regional news reports, the number of unwanted horses in the U.S. is rising. The UHC’s 2009 Unwanted Horses Survey found that 39 percent of the country’s equine care facilities are at capacity, with another 30 percent at 75-99 percent capacity. The UHC estimates 170,000 horses are “unwanted” in the U.S. per year. The survey concludes the maximum rate of occupancy for facilities is 18,060, with 11,180 horses being turned away per year.

The resources on the UHC’s Web site are an important bridge between people who are seeking alternatives for their horses and the facilities that are able to accept them. Such facilities include rescue, retirement and retraining facilities; therapeutic riding programs; colleges and universities; police and military organizations; public stables; and government and park service programs.

“The UHC gets daily e-mails regarding owner give ups and potential horse owners seeking to adopt. The larger our online network becomes, the more options become available for horses and horse owners in need. If you are a facility that will help with the care, training and use of these horses, we encourage you to sign on,” said Ericka Caslin, UHC director.

The UHC Web site is set up so that facilities can list themselves easily. Any facility that wishes to be listed can go to the UHC Web site and complete a brief questionnaire. To complete the questionnaire or view the facilities in the directory, go to http://www.unwantedhorsecoalition.org, click “Resources,” follow the link to “Facilities that Accept Horses” and fill out the short questionnaire. Facilities are listed on the UHC site by state. The information sought is intended to advise horse owners about what type of facility it is, contact information, whether it is tax exempt, year founded, horse capacity, number of staff and whether it follows the “Care Guidelines for Rescue and Retirement Facilities,” published by the American Association of Equine Practitioners.

The UHC Web site also has a series of questions that owners should consider when trying to decide on a facility, program or second use for their horse. “These questions will help owners know what options are available and what to look for in a facility. This is a difficult decision for many owners to make and we want to help them make the best one for their horse. There are plenty of horses that need care, training, and a good home. We want horse owners to be aware of the large rescue/retirement facilities with multiple locations as well as the smaller facilities that may serve a local area. They all have an important place in this effort,” said Caslin.

For information about the UHC and its efforts contact Ericka Caslin at ecaslin@horsecouncil.org or 202-296-4031.


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User