Unofficial end of summer | TSLN.com

Unofficial end of summer

For the Sept. 5, 2009 edition of Tri-State Livestock News.

Here it is again… Labor Day weekend… the unofficial end of summer. Many ‘last fling’ activities involving horses are taking place as we go to press; then things will begin to slow down as school takes precedence and the weather trends toward winter.

The South Dakota Cutting Horse Association will be holding an Aged Event at Huron next weekend, Sept. 9th and 10th. You can obtain more information about that by emailing Jackie at sdcutter58@aol.com or phoning (605)223-3144.

The South Dakota Quarter Horse Association’s AQHA Trail Ride will take place at Hay Creek Ranch near Nemo on Sept. 18th through 20th. Rain has been so abundant the hills are absolutely beautiful and green yet, so it should be a really pleasurable ride. It is limited to 50 participants; and horses are not available to rent.

Hay Creek Ranch is located in the northern Black Hills and offers camping, RV space, cabins, general store, laundry, corral and some 50 stalls. The weekend activities kick off with a short ride at 2 p.m. on Friday, followed by an evening meal. Breakfast on Saturday is from 7-8 a.m. and the ride heads out at 9:30 a.m. Lunch will be served on the trail, with the ride returning to the ranch around 4 p.m. Barbecue dinner is served at 6:30 with entertainment by Paul Larson afterward. A Sunday wakeup breakfast will be served at 7 a.m. so another ride can be enjoyed from 9:30 a.m. to noon before everyone heads home.

Coggins and health papers are required on horses coming in. Certified weed-free hay is also required, but is available for sale at the ranch. Their website is http://www.haycreekranch.net and you can register for the ride or obtain more information by calling ((605) 578-1142 or emailing contact@haycreekranch.net.

If you know anyone who rodeoed at Cal Poly during the 1940’s, 1950’s or 1960’s, please let them know a call is out for them and they need to contact Bonnie Rosser at (530) 633-4890 or (530) 751-6433. The next Cal Poly Rodeo Reunion, coming up Oct. 16-18, 2009, will be honoring those alums; so they are trying to reach them. Bonnie says, “It should be a great gathering and many have not returned to Cal Poly since their graduation some 50+ years ago.” The event will be held on campus in the original Farm Shop where Bonnie says, “Many of us have fond memories of the great dances…” Please share this information with any Cal Poly rodeo alumni you know of.

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Speaking of rodeo alumni, the 1961 men’s rodeo team from the University of Wyoming is finally being inducted into the University of Wyoming Athletic Hall of Fame. Ceremonies are set for Friday, Sept. 4, for this, the only University of Wyoming Team to win the Mens Team title at the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association’s National Finals Rodeo. One more special thing about the team is that all members were from Wyoming. It’s a pleasure to tip our ol’ Tri-State Stetson to the University of Wyoming for realizing rodeo is a sport and getting these guys inducted! We’re also very proud of the team which includes Frank Sheppherson, Jim Moore, Jerry Kauffman, Fred Wilson, Leon Cook and Al Smith. Tom Cristnick was a team member in 1961, but opted not to go to the National Finals; so Al Smith went as alternate. Here’s a big tip of the ol’ Tri-State Stetson guys – you’re not forgotten! After all, you blazed a good trail and have given the younguns something to aim for.

Long as we’re talking universities I should tell you Cornell University is seeking DNA from a large group of horses for a study on how body size genes may affect fundamental developmental processes such as cell growth. They say, “When horse breeders look to improve… their stock, they are often selecting for changes in genes, called alleles that affect body size and conformation. Allele variation in several genes has already been shown to contribute to body size diversity in many species.”

Researchers at Cornell say, “By exploring the genetics of body size in the horse, we hope to improve not only the livelihood of the horse population, but also better understand the genetics of diseases that affect all mammals, including humans.”

The DNA analysis of hundreds of horses from many different breeds and types is required to identify body size and complex disease genes. In addition to tail hair pullings, the study asks for a profile photo, 3-generation pedigree and 35 specified measurements of your horse; taking some 15 minutes of time per horse. All information is strictly confidential, and if you’re willing to assist in this important research, just contact the Brooks and Sutter Genetics Labs at (607) 254-8217, equinegenetics@cornell.edu or (607) 253-3592, sutterlab@cornell.edu.

On the subject of collecting equine DNA, I’m remiss in just now letting you know of the quest of Basha O’Reilly and her husband CuChullaine O’Reilly who have set off on the “first continuous, around-the-world equestrian expedition.” Their journey will cover 12,000 miles, cross 11 countries, last two years and “be the most highly developed diplomatic and scientific equestrian mission ever undertaken.”

Basha points out, “It may surprise many of you to consider… twelve men have walked on the moon, yet no human being has ever ridden around the earth! Yet the World Ride represents not a multi-billion dollar expansion into outer space but the affordable exploration of ourselves. During the journey we will be attempting to: a) make the first equestrian journey around the Earth; b) map the route using GPS technology so as to allow others to follow in our horses’ hoofprints; c) create a scholastic internet network which encourages 9- to 12-year-old children to study geography, while interacting with the World Ride and each other’s classrooms; d) collect hair samples from every known horse breed so as to create the first complete equine DNA chain; e) promote the unity of mankind via our species’ ancient link with the horse.”

The World Ride website is http://www.theworldride.org/. Basha says, “While designed to create the paramount equestrian trail by taking us through Europe, Central Asia, Siberia and North America, we shall be riding along the Equestrian Equator, that invisible line across which history flowed east and west.”

Basha’s quest to construct the first uninterrupted equine DNA chain is moving right along. An international team of volunteers has been busy in recent months, obtaining samples from horse owners worldwide. Basha, who will collect hair samples from the breeds encountered on her World Ride, says, “The blind North American Long Rider, Andi Mills, armed with her ‘talking computer’, is leading this team of international volunteers. Using the internet, email, Facebook and other 21st century social media, Andi’s DNA team are creating the most extensive use of the concept of ‘crowd sourcing’ ever seen in the modern horse world.”

Roughly a week after launching the World Ride website and starting the DNA drive Basha emailed, “with about 75 breeds either collected, or in the process of arriving, we have jointly assembled nearly a sixth of the world’s equine DNA in less than a fortnight.” If you’d like to take part in the DNA drive – or get your geography class involved with the World Ride – visit the website or email Basha at worldriders@theworldride.org.

This ol’ lariat has played out plumb to the end once more…

Here it is again… Labor Day weekend… the unofficial end of summer. Many ‘last fling’ activities involving horses are taking place as we go to press; then things will begin to slow down as school takes precedence and the weather trends toward winter.

The South Dakota Cutting Horse Association will be holding an Aged Event at Huron next weekend, Sept. 9th and 10th. You can obtain more information about that by emailing Jackie at sdcutter58@aol.com or phoning (605)223-3144.

The South Dakota Quarter Horse Association’s AQHA Trail Ride will take place at Hay Creek Ranch near Nemo on Sept. 18th through 20th. Rain has been so abundant the hills are absolutely beautiful and green yet, so it should be a really pleasurable ride. It is limited to 50 participants; and horses are not available to rent.

Hay Creek Ranch is located in the northern Black Hills and offers camping, RV space, cabins, general store, laundry, corral and some 50 stalls. The weekend activities kick off with a short ride at 2 p.m. on Friday, followed by an evening meal. Breakfast on Saturday is from 7-8 a.m. and the ride heads out at 9:30 a.m. Lunch will be served on the trail, with the ride returning to the ranch around 4 p.m. Barbecue dinner is served at 6:30 with entertainment by Paul Larson afterward. A Sunday wakeup breakfast will be served at 7 a.m. so another ride can be enjoyed from 9:30 a.m. to noon before everyone heads home.

Coggins and health papers are required on horses coming in. Certified weed-free hay is also required, but is available for sale at the ranch. Their website is http://www.haycreekranch.net and you can register for the ride or obtain more information by calling ((605) 578-1142 or emailing contact@haycreekranch.net.

If you know anyone who rodeoed at Cal Poly during the 1940’s, 1950’s or 1960’s, please let them know a call is out for them and they need to contact Bonnie Rosser at (530) 633-4890 or (530) 751-6433. The next Cal Poly Rodeo Reunion, coming up Oct. 16-18, 2009, will be honoring those alums; so they are trying to reach them. Bonnie says, “It should be a great gathering and many have not returned to Cal Poly since their graduation some 50+ years ago.” The event will be held on campus in the original Farm Shop where Bonnie says, “Many of us have fond memories of the great dances…” Please share this information with any Cal Poly rodeo alumni you know of.

Speaking of rodeo alumni, the 1961 men’s rodeo team from the University of Wyoming is finally being inducted into the University of Wyoming Athletic Hall of Fame. Ceremonies are set for Friday, Sept. 4, for this, the only University of Wyoming Team to win the Mens Team title at the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association’s National Finals Rodeo. One more special thing about the team is that all members were from Wyoming. It’s a pleasure to tip our ol’ Tri-State Stetson to the University of Wyoming for realizing rodeo is a sport and getting these guys inducted! We’re also very proud of the team which includes Frank Sheppherson, Jim Moore, Jerry Kauffman, Fred Wilson, Leon Cook and Al Smith. Tom Cristnick was a team member in 1961, but opted not to go to the National Finals; so Al Smith went as alternate. Here’s a big tip of the ol’ Tri-State Stetson guys – you’re not forgotten! After all, you blazed a good trail and have given the younguns something to aim for.

Long as we’re talking universities I should tell you Cornell University is seeking DNA from a large group of horses for a study on how body size genes may affect fundamental developmental processes such as cell growth. They say, “When horse breeders look to improve… their stock, they are often selecting for changes in genes, called alleles that affect body size and conformation. Allele variation in several genes has already been shown to contribute to body size diversity in many species.”

Researchers at Cornell say, “By exploring the genetics of body size in the horse, we hope to improve not only the livelihood of the horse population, but also better understand the genetics of diseases that affect all mammals, including humans.”

The DNA analysis of hundreds of horses from many different breeds and types is required to identify body size and complex disease genes. In addition to tail hair pullings, the study asks for a profile photo, 3-generation pedigree and 35 specified measurements of your horse; taking some 15 minutes of time per horse. All information is strictly confidential, and if you’re willing to assist in this important research, just contact the Brooks and Sutter Genetics Labs at (607) 254-8217, equinegenetics@cornell.edu or (607) 253-3592, sutterlab@cornell.edu.

On the subject of collecting equine DNA, I’m remiss in just now letting you know of the quest of Basha O’Reilly and her husband CuChullaine O’Reilly who have set off on the “first continuous, around-the-world equestrian expedition.” Their journey will cover 12,000 miles, cross 11 countries, last two years and “be the most highly developed diplomatic and scientific equestrian mission ever undertaken.”

Basha points out, “It may surprise many of you to consider… twelve men have walked on the moon, yet no human being has ever ridden around the earth! Yet the World Ride represents not a multi-billion dollar expansion into outer space but the affordable exploration of ourselves. During the journey we will be attempting to: a) make the first equestrian journey around the Earth; b) map the route using GPS technology so as to allow others to follow in our horses’ hoofprints; c) create a scholastic internet network which encourages 9- to 12-year-old children to study geography, while interacting with the World Ride and each other’s classrooms; d) collect hair samples from every known horse breed so as to create the first complete equine DNA chain; e) promote the unity of mankind via our species’ ancient link with the horse.”

The World Ride website is http://www.theworldride.org/. Basha says, “While designed to create the paramount equestrian trail by taking us through Europe, Central Asia, Siberia and North America, we shall be riding along the Equestrian Equator, that invisible line across which history flowed east and west.”

Basha’s quest to construct the first uninterrupted equine DNA chain is moving right along. An international team of volunteers has been busy in recent months, obtaining samples from horse owners worldwide. Basha, who will collect hair samples from the breeds encountered on her World Ride, says, “The blind North American Long Rider, Andi Mills, armed with her ‘talking computer’, is leading this team of international volunteers. Using the internet, email, Facebook and other 21st century social media, Andi’s DNA team are creating the most extensive use of the concept of ‘crowd sourcing’ ever seen in the modern horse world.”

Roughly a week after launching the World Ride website and starting the DNA drive Basha emailed, “with about 75 breeds either collected, or in the process of arriving, we have jointly assembled nearly a sixth of the world’s equine DNA in less than a fortnight.” If you’d like to take part in the DNA drive – or get your geography class involved with the World Ride – visit the website or email Basha at worldriders@theworldride.org.

This ol’ lariat has played out plumb to the end once more…