USDA EHV-1 situation report: May 16, 2011 | TSLN.com
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USDA EHV-1 situation report: May 16, 2011

TSLN staff reports

The U.S. Department of Agriculture released a situation report update May 26, 2011 on the Equine Herpes Virus (EHV-1).

EHV-I infection in horses can cause respiratory disease, abortion in mares, neonatal foal death, and/or neurologic disease. The neurologic form of EHV-1 is called Equine Herpes Virus Myeloencephalopathy (EHM). While EHV-1 and EHM are only officially listed as reportable diseases in some states, private veterinary practitioners are encouraged to notify their State Animal Health Officials of any suspected or confirmed cases, regardless of current official state reporting requirements.

Cases of EHV-1 and EHM have been identified recently in horses that attended the National Cutting Horse Association (NCHA) Western National Championship event in Ogden, UT, held from April 29 to May 8, 2011. The NCHA has notified State Animal Health Officials of horses from their states that were entered in the event and may have been exposed to the virus. State Animal Health Officials have contacted the owners of potentially exposed horses. Standardized recommendations were developed by state and federal officials and are being followed to isolate exposed horses, monitor them for clinical signs of EHV-1, and work with private veterinary practitioners to test and treat horses affected with the disease. Biosecurity procedures have been recommended for premises with suspect and confirmed cases to mitigate further disease spread.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture released a situation report update May 26, 2011 on the Equine Herpes Virus (EHV-1).

EHV-I infection in horses can cause respiratory disease, abortion in mares, neonatal foal death, and/or neurologic disease. The neurologic form of EHV-1 is called Equine Herpes Virus Myeloencephalopathy (EHM). While EHV-1 and EHM are only officially listed as reportable diseases in some states, private veterinary practitioners are encouraged to notify their State Animal Health Officials of any suspected or confirmed cases, regardless of current official state reporting requirements.

Cases of EHV-1 and EHM have been identified recently in horses that attended the National Cutting Horse Association (NCHA) Western National Championship event in Ogden, UT, held from April 29 to May 8, 2011. The NCHA has notified State Animal Health Officials of horses from their states that were entered in the event and may have been exposed to the virus. State Animal Health Officials have contacted the owners of potentially exposed horses. Standardized recommendations were developed by state and federal officials and are being followed to isolate exposed horses, monitor them for clinical signs of EHV-1, and work with private veterinary practitioners to test and treat horses affected with the disease. Biosecurity procedures have been recommended for premises with suspect and confirmed cases to mitigate further disease spread.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture released a situation report update May 26, 2011 on the Equine Herpes Virus (EHV-1).

EHV-I infection in horses can cause respiratory disease, abortion in mares, neonatal foal death, and/or neurologic disease. The neurologic form of EHV-1 is called Equine Herpes Virus Myeloencephalopathy (EHM). While EHV-1 and EHM are only officially listed as reportable diseases in some states, private veterinary practitioners are encouraged to notify their State Animal Health Officials of any suspected or confirmed cases, regardless of current official state reporting requirements.

Cases of EHV-1 and EHM have been identified recently in horses that attended the National Cutting Horse Association (NCHA) Western National Championship event in Ogden, UT, held from April 29 to May 8, 2011. The NCHA has notified State Animal Health Officials of horses from their states that were entered in the event and may have been exposed to the virus. State Animal Health Officials have contacted the owners of potentially exposed horses. Standardized recommendations were developed by state and federal officials and are being followed to isolate exposed horses, monitor them for clinical signs of EHV-1, and work with private veterinary practitioners to test and treat horses affected with the disease. Biosecurity procedures have been recommended for premises with suspect and confirmed cases to mitigate further disease spread.


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