Well water needs periodic tests | TSLN.com

Well water needs periodic tests

Russ Quinn

DTN file photoLivestock is a common cause of nitrate contamination in well water.

OMAHA (DTN) – Rural residents who get their drinking water from private wells should have that water tested periodically and treat the water if needed.

This reminder was triggered by a new study from the National Water Quality Assessment (NWQA) Programs of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which found more than one in five, or about 23 percent, of domestic wells had one or more contaminants at levels that could be a potential health concern.

About 2,100 private wells were sampled from 1991 to 2004 in 48 states and in parts of 30 regionally-extensive aquifers, said Leslie DeSimone, hydrologist with the Massachusetts Water Science Center in Northborough. DeSimone is one of the study’s authors.

Contaminants most often found at concentrations greater than human-health benchmarks were inorganic chemicals, DeSimone said. These include radon, fluoride and several trace elements, including arsenic and uranium.

“All of these contaminants are naturally occurring from geologic sources and have regional patterns,” said DeSimone.

OMAHA (DTN) – Rural residents who get their drinking water from private wells should have that water tested periodically and treat the water if needed.

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This reminder was triggered by a new study from the National Water Quality Assessment (NWQA) Programs of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which found more than one in five, or about 23 percent, of domestic wells had one or more contaminants at levels that could be a potential health concern.

About 2,100 private wells were sampled from 1991 to 2004 in 48 states and in parts of 30 regionally-extensive aquifers, said Leslie DeSimone, hydrologist with the Massachusetts Water Science Center in Northborough. DeSimone is one of the study’s authors.

Contaminants most often found at concentrations greater than human-health benchmarks were inorganic chemicals, DeSimone said. These include radon, fluoride and several trace elements, including arsenic and uranium.

“All of these contaminants are naturally occurring from geologic sources and have regional patterns,” said DeSimone.

OMAHA (DTN) – Rural residents who get their drinking water from private wells should have that water tested periodically and treat the water if needed.

This reminder was triggered by a new study from the National Water Quality Assessment (NWQA) Programs of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which found more than one in five, or about 23 percent, of domestic wells had one or more contaminants at levels that could be a potential health concern.

About 2,100 private wells were sampled from 1991 to 2004 in 48 states and in parts of 30 regionally-extensive aquifers, said Leslie DeSimone, hydrologist with the Massachusetts Water Science Center in Northborough. DeSimone is one of the study’s authors.

Contaminants most often found at concentrations greater than human-health benchmarks were inorganic chemicals, DeSimone said. These include radon, fluoride and several trace elements, including arsenic and uranium.

“All of these contaminants are naturally occurring from geologic sources and have regional patterns,” said DeSimone.

russ quinn can be reached at russ.quinn@dtn.com