Welsch’s Bale in a Bag packages hay for horses in a new way | TSLN.com
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Welsch’s Bale in a Bag packages hay for horses in a new way

Next spring, horse owners will have an opportunity to purchase small square hay bales in more economical packaging that will prevent spoilage. The product is called Welsch’s Bale in a Bag, which contains a 40-pound bale covered with poly plastic.

“Our original plan was to replicate a small square bale that has been very popular over the years, and put it in a more economical package,” said Tom Welsch of Welsch’s Bale in a Bag of Mitchell, NE.

The product has been in the works for two years, when Welsch began seeking a more economical way to produce horse hay in small square bales. “One day, I was selling some small square bales to a local feed store, and I noticed some bags of shavings. I thought it might be a good way to package and sell hay, so during the last two years we have been developing a process that will do that,” Welsch said.



After looking at machinery needed to get package hay correctly, the Welschs decided their existing equipment wouldn’t work. “We found some machinery we could retrofit to take those large square bales, bring them down, and package them into a bale in a bag. The bale in a bag is a 40-pound bale covered with poly plastic. It looks a lot like a shavings bale. Using this process allows us to harvest our hay crop economically, and market it in a user-friendly package,” he explained.

“The greatest thing about the bale is it’s weather-tight,” Welsch continued. “It is good for us as the processor, but it is good for the end-user as well. The wrapping will prevent water from getting into the bale and prevent spoilage. Horse owners can throw these bales on top of their horse trailer and haul them wherever they wish. If they want to put them in a tack room in the trailer, they won’t make a mess. For us, they stack very nicely on a pallet, and can be shipped across the country more economically than a regular small square bale.”



Welsch said they were able to find some material to package the bales that will allow them to breathe so the hay will not mold. “The technology we will be using will allow the bales to exhale moisture, but it won’t intake moisture into the bag,” he explained.

Next spring, horse owners will have an opportunity to purchase small square hay bales in more economical packaging that will prevent spoilage. The product is called Welsch’s Bale in a Bag, which contains a 40-pound bale covered with poly plastic.

“Our original plan was to replicate a small square bale that has been very popular over the years, and put it in a more economical package,” said Tom Welsch of Welsch’s Bale in a Bag of Mitchell, NE.

The product has been in the works for two years, when Welsch began seeking a more economical way to produce horse hay in small square bales. “One day, I was selling some small square bales to a local feed store, and I noticed some bags of shavings. I thought it might be a good way to package and sell hay, so during the last two years we have been developing a process that will do that,” Welsch said.

After looking at machinery needed to get package hay correctly, the Welschs decided their existing equipment wouldn’t work. “We found some machinery we could retrofit to take those large square bales, bring them down, and package them into a bale in a bag. The bale in a bag is a 40-pound bale covered with poly plastic. It looks a lot like a shavings bale. Using this process allows us to harvest our hay crop economically, and market it in a user-friendly package,” he explained.

“The greatest thing about the bale is it’s weather-tight,” Welsch continued. “It is good for us as the processor, but it is good for the end-user as well. The wrapping will prevent water from getting into the bale and prevent spoilage. Horse owners can throw these bales on top of their horse trailer and haul them wherever they wish. If they want to put them in a tack room in the trailer, they won’t make a mess. For us, they stack very nicely on a pallet, and can be shipped across the country more economically than a regular small square bale.”

Welsch said they were able to find some material to package the bales that will allow them to breathe so the hay will not mold. “The technology we will be using will allow the bales to exhale moisture, but it won’t intake moisture into the bag,” he explained.

Next spring, horse owners will have an opportunity to purchase small square hay bales in more economical packaging that will prevent spoilage. The product is called Welsch’s Bale in a Bag, which contains a 40-pound bale covered with poly plastic.

“Our original plan was to replicate a small square bale that has been very popular over the years, and put it in a more economical package,” said Tom Welsch of Welsch’s Bale in a Bag of Mitchell, NE.

The product has been in the works for two years, when Welsch began seeking a more economical way to produce horse hay in small square bales. “One day, I was selling some small square bales to a local feed store, and I noticed some bags of shavings. I thought it might be a good way to package and sell hay, so during the last two years we have been developing a process that will do that,” Welsch said.

After looking at machinery needed to get package hay correctly, the Welschs decided their existing equipment wouldn’t work. “We found some machinery we could retrofit to take those large square bales, bring them down, and package them into a bale in a bag. The bale in a bag is a 40-pound bale covered with poly plastic. It looks a lot like a shavings bale. Using this process allows us to harvest our hay crop economically, and market it in a user-friendly package,” he explained.

“The greatest thing about the bale is it’s weather-tight,” Welsch continued. “It is good for us as the processor, but it is good for the end-user as well. The wrapping will prevent water from getting into the bale and prevent spoilage. Horse owners can throw these bales on top of their horse trailer and haul them wherever they wish. If they want to put them in a tack room in the trailer, they won’t make a mess. For us, they stack very nicely on a pallet, and can be shipped across the country more economically than a regular small square bale.”

Welsch said they were able to find some material to package the bales that will allow them to breathe so the hay will not mold. “The technology we will be using will allow the bales to exhale moisture, but it won’t intake moisture into the bag,” he explained.

Next spring, horse owners will have an opportunity to purchase small square hay bales in more economical packaging that will prevent spoilage. The product is called Welsch’s Bale in a Bag, which contains a 40-pound bale covered with poly plastic.

“Our original plan was to replicate a small square bale that has been very popular over the years, and put it in a more economical package,” said Tom Welsch of Welsch’s Bale in a Bag of Mitchell, NE.

The product has been in the works for two years, when Welsch began seeking a more economical way to produce horse hay in small square bales. “One day, I was selling some small square bales to a local feed store, and I noticed some bags of shavings. I thought it might be a good way to package and sell hay, so during the last two years we have been developing a process that will do that,” Welsch said.

After looking at machinery needed to get package hay correctly, the Welschs decided their existing equipment wouldn’t work. “We found some machinery we could retrofit to take those large square bales, bring them down, and package them into a bale in a bag. The bale in a bag is a 40-pound bale covered with poly plastic. It looks a lot like a shavings bale. Using this process allows us to harvest our hay crop economically, and market it in a user-friendly package,” he explained.

“The greatest thing about the bale is it’s weather-tight,” Welsch continued. “It is good for us as the processor, but it is good for the end-user as well. The wrapping will prevent water from getting into the bale and prevent spoilage. Horse owners can throw these bales on top of their horse trailer and haul them wherever they wish. If they want to put them in a tack room in the trailer, they won’t make a mess. For us, they stack very nicely on a pallet, and can be shipped across the country more economically than a regular small square bale.”

Welsch said they were able to find some material to package the bales that will allow them to breathe so the hay will not mold. “The technology we will be using will allow the bales to exhale moisture, but it won’t intake moisture into the bag,” he explained.

Next spring, horse owners will have an opportunity to purchase small square hay bales in more economical packaging that will prevent spoilage. The product is called Welsch’s Bale in a Bag, which contains a 40-pound bale covered with poly plastic.

“Our original plan was to replicate a small square bale that has been very popular over the years, and put it in a more economical package,” said Tom Welsch of Welsch’s Bale in a Bag of Mitchell, NE.

The product has been in the works for two years, when Welsch began seeking a more economical way to produce horse hay in small square bales. “One day, I was selling some small square bales to a local feed store, and I noticed some bags of shavings. I thought it might be a good way to package and sell hay, so during the last two years we have been developing a process that will do that,” Welsch said.

After looking at machinery needed to get package hay correctly, the Welschs decided their existing equipment wouldn’t work. “We found some machinery we could retrofit to take those large square bales, bring them down, and package them into a bale in a bag. The bale in a bag is a 40-pound bale covered with poly plastic. It looks a lot like a shavings bale. Using this process allows us to harvest our hay crop economically, and market it in a user-friendly package,” he explained.

“The greatest thing about the bale is it’s weather-tight,” Welsch continued. “It is good for us as the processor, but it is good for the end-user as well. The wrapping will prevent water from getting into the bale and prevent spoilage. Horse owners can throw these bales on top of their horse trailer and haul them wherever they wish. If they want to put them in a tack room in the trailer, they won’t make a mess. For us, they stack very nicely on a pallet, and can be shipped across the country more economically than a regular small square bale.”

Welsch said they were able to find some material to package the bales that will allow them to breathe so the hay will not mold. “The technology we will be using will allow the bales to exhale moisture, but it won’t intake moisture into the bag,” he explained.


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