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Wild times at the Ranch Rodeo

TSLN photo by Doug Hogan2010 BHSS Ranch Rodeo Champions, Rabo AgriFinance of Faith, SD. Team members include, from left to right: Captain Chip Heidler of Faith; Brett Wilcox of Red Owl, SD; O.J. Heidler of Opal, SD; Tye Hale of White Owl, SD; and sponsor Kent Rasmussen of Rapid City.

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The crowd pleasing Black Hills Stock Show Ranch Rodeo was held on Feb. 2 and drew a good crowd to watch the fast paced preliminary rounds during the day, followed by the finals that evening. Twelve teams made it to the finals, three of which had qualified for the 2009 finals as well.

Five events are held with the points from those events deciding the overall winner. Mutton Busting was also part of the Ranch Rodeo, but those points weren’t part of the team score. Events were Trailer Relay, Rope Mug Tying, Team Branding, Double Mugging and Ranch Bronc Riding, all with a two minute time limit.

The Trailer Relay features two pickups and trailers, parked opposite each other in the arena, with the pickups toward the center. Each team loads its saddled horses into one of the trailers, its riders in the cab of the pickup, and when the horn sounds, they bale out and race to the trailer to unload the horses. The first horse and rider takes the baton on a lap around the arena, wide open, and then hands the baton off to the second rider, and so on. The rider who is done with their lap loads their horse into the trailer, then waits to help the next one. Since there are two teams doing this at the same time, it’s a wild mount/dismount and horse race, with lots of horses and riders to potentially run into.

There are many near-misses as the opposing team has to get around the crowd at the back of the competition’s trailer. The last one on the relay generally rode his horse right into the trailer at full speed, with the rider grabbing the roof of the trailer and sliding off as the horse went in. The trailer door was slammed and the riders sprinted to the pickup, jumped in, slammed the doors and signaled “time” with the flash of headlights. Despite the event being much wilder and more dangerous than juggling chainsaws while running with scissors, no one, horse or cowboy, was hurt.

The Rope-Mug-Tying event featured numbered cattle at one end of the arena and the four person team on the other, both behind chalk lines. Each team entered the arena, the number was announced, and their time started when the team crosses the chalk line. They rode to the cattle, sorted out the correct number steer, and it was driven over the chalk line before it could be roped. Once it was across the line and roped, the other team members mugged the steer down onto his left side, and tied three legs. The timer stopped when the rope was off the steer’s head. The steer had to remain tied for six seconds after the rope was off his head.

Team Branding had two teams working at the same time, with separate stop watches running. Each team had a roper, two muggers, and a brander. The calves were held behind a line and mixed with some roping steers to make it more challenging. The roper rode into the bunch at a walk or trot, heeled a calf, and then logged him back across the line to the muggers who put him on his right side, and remove the rope. The brander then put a chalk “brand” on the left hip and the calf was released out into the main part of the arena. When the second calf was done, the branding iron was returned to the barrel and time was stopped. Any unnecessary roughness could have the team flagged out for a no-time.

The Double Mugging consisted of a roper, two muggers and one steer. The steer was in the roping chute with a 20 foot score and the barrier had a 20 second penalty for breaking it. The steer left the chute, then the rider roped him while two muggers ran out to grab the steer. One mugger pulled a ribbon off of the end of the steer’s tail and ran back to the roping chute while the other mugger pulled the head loop off. Surprisingly, many of the runners were back to the finish line before the rope was off of the steer’s head. Naturally, the steers didn’t cooperate any more than necessary during this event.

The final event was the Ranch Bronc Riding. The bronc rider provided his own stock saddle (no rodeo bronc riding saddles allowed) and a rope to put on the bronc halter. He could ride with one or two reins, and one or two hands. Each team served as its own pickup men as well and they waited behind a designated line. Time started when the horse left the bucking chute and the rider had to ride for six seconds, however he chose to do it. At the end of six seconds, the rest of the team could ride out to help him. They had to get the saddle and flank off of the horse and return the saddle, on foot, to a chalk circle at the front of the bucking chutes. This sounds fairly simple, but, the broncs were unwilling to let the cowboys have the saddle back when they were done bucking. The unsaddling of a saddle bronc is much more difficult than riding one, as it turns out, and saddles get heavier the longer they are carried.

Since all of the events had a two minute time limit, any team getting a no-time had 120 seconds added to their total time. Unsportsmanlike conduct could have led to an automatic disqualification, but the teams all played by the rules and their cowboy ethics.

Fast times in the events were: Trailer Race – TC Outfit, Vale, SD; Rope-Mug-Tying – White Performance Horses, Hot Springs, SD; Team Branding – White Performance Horses; Double Mugging – South Dakota Stockgrowers Association; and Range Horse Bronc Riding – Rabo AgriFinance, Faith, SD.

The competition was hot and heavy, with only four teams having a score in every event at the end of the fourth event. This lead to a real push in the Ranch Bronc Riding to get the best score, as the scores were that close. Going into the last event, the White Performance Horses team was in the lead, with TC Outfit in second, Rabo AgriFinance in third, and the Horseshoe Bar All Stars in fourth.

When the dust had settled and the points added up, the team of Rabo AgriFinance of Faith had pulled ahead and won the Ranch Rodeo. Their spectacular bronc ride and fast unsaddling and sprint had cinched it up with the fastest time of the Bronc Riding.

The Rabo AgriFinance team included: Captain, Chip Heidler of Faith, SD; O.J. Heidler of Opal, SD; Tye Hale of White Owl, SD; and Brett Wilcox of Red Owl, SD.

Second Place was White Performance Horses of Hot Springs with Hardy White of Hot Springs as Captain. The team also included Clint Hufty of Rapid City; Coy Thompson of Whitewood; and Clay Crago of Belle Fourche, SD.

Third was Horseshoe Bar All Stars of Scenic. Their captain was Joe Wilson of Kyle, SD; with Luke Newsam of Murdo, SD; Shaun Goodman of Kyle; and Jesse Wilson of Kyle, rounding out the team.

Fourth was 2009 Champs TC Outfit of Vale. Their captain was Travis Casteel of Vale, SD, and the remaining team members included Clint Hammerstrom of Hereford, SD, Kacy Wachob of Hay Springs, NE, and Buddy Darnell of Gordon, NE.

The coveted Top Hand Award was won by Hardy White of Hot Springs with Tye Hale’s horse winning the equally prized Top Horse Award.

It was an exciting good time to watch, and it shouldn’t take most of the contestants over two weeks to recover from all the fun they had. Their saddle horses are probably going to be puzzling over the whole thing for a little longer than that though.

The crowd pleasing Black Hills Stock Show Ranch Rodeo was held on Feb. 2 and drew a good crowd to watch the fast paced preliminary rounds during the day, followed by the finals that evening. Twelve teams made it to the finals, three of which had qualified for the 2009 finals as well.

Five events are held with the points from those events deciding the overall winner. Mutton Busting was also part of the Ranch Rodeo, but those points weren’t part of the team score. Events were Trailer Relay, Rope Mug Tying, Team Branding, Double Mugging and Ranch Bronc Riding, all with a two minute time limit.

The Trailer Relay features two pickups and trailers, parked opposite each other in the arena, with the pickups toward the center. Each team loads its saddled horses into one of the trailers, its riders in the cab of the pickup, and when the horn sounds, they bale out and race to the trailer to unload the horses. The first horse and rider takes the baton on a lap around the arena, wide open, and then hands the baton off to the second rider, and so on. The rider who is done with their lap loads their horse into the trailer, then waits to help the next one. Since there are two teams doing this at the same time, it’s a wild mount/dismount and horse race, with lots of horses and riders to potentially run into.

There are many near-misses as the opposing team has to get around the crowd at the back of the competition’s trailer. The last one on the relay generally rode his horse right into the trailer at full speed, with the rider grabbing the roof of the trailer and sliding off as the horse went in. The trailer door was slammed and the riders sprinted to the pickup, jumped in, slammed the doors and signaled “time” with the flash of headlights. Despite the event being much wilder and more dangerous than juggling chainsaws while running with scissors, no one, horse or cowboy, was hurt.

The Rope-Mug-Tying event featured numbered cattle at one end of the arena and the four person team on the other, both behind chalk lines. Each team entered the arena, the number was announced, and their time started when the team crosses the chalk line. They rode to the cattle, sorted out the correct number steer, and it was driven over the chalk line before it could be roped. Once it was across the line and roped, the other team members mugged the steer down onto his left side, and tied three legs. The timer stopped when the rope was off the steer’s head. The steer had to remain tied for six seconds after the rope was off his head.

Team Branding had two teams working at the same time, with separate stop watches running. Each team had a roper, two muggers, and a brander. The calves were held behind a line and mixed with some roping steers to make it more challenging. The roper rode into the bunch at a walk or trot, heeled a calf, and then logged him back across the line to the muggers who put him on his right side, and remove the rope. The brander then put a chalk “brand” on the left hip and the calf was released out into the main part of the arena. When the second calf was done, the branding iron was returned to the barrel and time was stopped. Any unnecessary roughness could have the team flagged out for a no-time.

The Double Mugging consisted of a roper, two muggers and one steer. The steer was in the roping chute with a 20 foot score and the barrier had a 20 second penalty for breaking it. The steer left the chute, then the rider roped him while two muggers ran out to grab the steer. One mugger pulled a ribbon off of the end of the steer’s tail and ran back to the roping chute while the other mugger pulled the head loop off. Surprisingly, many of the runners were back to the finish line before the rope was off of the steer’s head. Naturally, the steers didn’t cooperate any more than necessary during this event.

The final event was the Ranch Bronc Riding. The bronc rider provided his own stock saddle (no rodeo bronc riding saddles allowed) and a rope to put on the bronc halter. He could ride with one or two reins, and one or two hands. Each team served as its own pickup men as well and they waited behind a designated line. Time started when the horse left the bucking chute and the rider had to ride for six seconds, however he chose to do it. At the end of six seconds, the rest of the team could ride out to help him. They had to get the saddle and flank off of the horse and return the saddle, on foot, to a chalk circle at the front of the bucking chutes. This sounds fairly simple, but, the broncs were unwilling to let the cowboys have the saddle back when they were done bucking. The unsaddling of a saddle bronc is much more difficult than riding one, as it turns out, and saddles get heavier the longer they are carried.

Since all of the events had a two minute time limit, any team getting a no-time had 120 seconds added to their total time. Unsportsmanlike conduct could have led to an automatic disqualification, but the teams all played by the rules and their cowboy ethics.

Fast times in the events were: Trailer Race – TC Outfit, Vale, SD; Rope-Mug-Tying – White Performance Horses, Hot Springs, SD; Team Branding – White Performance Horses; Double Mugging – South Dakota Stockgrowers Association; and Range Horse Bronc Riding – Rabo AgriFinance, Faith, SD.

The competition was hot and heavy, with only four teams having a score in every event at the end of the fourth event. This lead to a real push in the Ranch Bronc Riding to get the best score, as the scores were that close. Going into the last event, the White Performance Horses team was in the lead, with TC Outfit in second, Rabo AgriFinance in third, and the Horseshoe Bar All Stars in fourth.

When the dust had settled and the points added up, the team of Rabo AgriFinance of Faith had pulled ahead and won the Ranch Rodeo. Their spectacular bronc ride and fast unsaddling and sprint had cinched it up with the fastest time of the Bronc Riding.

The Rabo AgriFinance team included: Captain, Chip Heidler of Faith, SD; O.J. Heidler of Opal, SD; Tye Hale of White Owl, SD; and Brett Wilcox of Red Owl, SD.

Second Place was White Performance Horses of Hot Springs with Hardy White of Hot Springs as Captain. The team also included Clint Hufty of Rapid City; Coy Thompson of Whitewood; and Clay Crago of Belle Fourche, SD.

Third was Horseshoe Bar All Stars of Scenic. Their captain was Joe Wilson of Kyle, SD; with Luke Newsam of Murdo, SD; Shaun Goodman of Kyle; and Jesse Wilson of Kyle, rounding out the team.

Fourth was 2009 Champs TC Outfit of Vale. Their captain was Travis Casteel of Vale, SD, and the remaining team members included Clint Hammerstrom of Hereford, SD, Kacy Wachob of Hay Springs, NE, and Buddy Darnell of Gordon, NE.

The coveted Top Hand Award was won by Hardy White of Hot Springs with Tye Hale’s horse winning the equally prized Top Horse Award.

It was an exciting good time to watch, and it shouldn’t take most of the contestants over two weeks to recover from all the fun they had. Their saddle horses are probably going to be puzzling over the whole thing for a little longer than that though.

The crowd pleasing Black Hills Stock Show Ranch Rodeo was held on Feb. 2 and drew a good crowd to watch the fast paced preliminary rounds during the day, followed by the finals that evening. Twelve teams made it to the finals, three of which had qualified for the 2009 finals as well.

Five events are held with the points from those events deciding the overall winner. Mutton Busting was also part of the Ranch Rodeo, but those points weren’t part of the team score. Events were Trailer Relay, Rope Mug Tying, Team Branding, Double Mugging and Ranch Bronc Riding, all with a two minute time limit.

The Trailer Relay features two pickups and trailers, parked opposite each other in the arena, with the pickups toward the center. Each team loads its saddled horses into one of the trailers, its riders in the cab of the pickup, and when the horn sounds, they bale out and race to the trailer to unload the horses. The first horse and rider takes the baton on a lap around the arena, wide open, and then hands the baton off to the second rider, and so on. The rider who is done with their lap loads their horse into the trailer, then waits to help the next one. Since there are two teams doing this at the same time, it’s a wild mount/dismount and horse race, with lots of horses and riders to potentially run into.

There are many near-misses as the opposing team has to get around the crowd at the back of the competition’s trailer. The last one on the relay generally rode his horse right into the trailer at full speed, with the rider grabbing the roof of the trailer and sliding off as the horse went in. The trailer door was slammed and the riders sprinted to the pickup, jumped in, slammed the doors and signaled “time” with the flash of headlights. Despite the event being much wilder and more dangerous than juggling chainsaws while running with scissors, no one, horse or cowboy, was hurt.

The Rope-Mug-Tying event featured numbered cattle at one end of the arena and the four person team on the other, both behind chalk lines. Each team entered the arena, the number was announced, and their time started when the team crosses the chalk line. They rode to the cattle, sorted out the correct number steer, and it was driven over the chalk line before it could be roped. Once it was across the line and roped, the other team members mugged the steer down onto his left side, and tied three legs. The timer stopped when the rope was off the steer’s head. The steer had to remain tied for six seconds after the rope was off his head.

Team Branding had two teams working at the same time, with separate stop watches running. Each team had a roper, two muggers, and a brander. The calves were held behind a line and mixed with some roping steers to make it more challenging. The roper rode into the bunch at a walk or trot, heeled a calf, and then logged him back across the line to the muggers who put him on his right side, and remove the rope. The brander then put a chalk “brand” on the left hip and the calf was released out into the main part of the arena. When the second calf was done, the branding iron was returned to the barrel and time was stopped. Any unnecessary roughness could have the team flagged out for a no-time.

The Double Mugging consisted of a roper, two muggers and one steer. The steer was in the roping chute with a 20 foot score and the barrier had a 20 second penalty for breaking it. The steer left the chute, then the rider roped him while two muggers ran out to grab the steer. One mugger pulled a ribbon off of the end of the steer’s tail and ran back to the roping chute while the other mugger pulled the head loop off. Surprisingly, many of the runners were back to the finish line before the rope was off of the steer’s head. Naturally, the steers didn’t cooperate any more than necessary during this event.

The final event was the Ranch Bronc Riding. The bronc rider provided his own stock saddle (no rodeo bronc riding saddles allowed) and a rope to put on the bronc halter. He could ride with one or two reins, and one or two hands. Each team served as its own pickup men as well and they waited behind a designated line. Time started when the horse left the bucking chute and the rider had to ride for six seconds, however he chose to do it. At the end of six seconds, the rest of the team could ride out to help him. They had to get the saddle and flank off of the horse and return the saddle, on foot, to a chalk circle at the front of the bucking chutes. This sounds fairly simple, but, the broncs were unwilling to let the cowboys have the saddle back when they were done bucking. The unsaddling of a saddle bronc is much more difficult than riding one, as it turns out, and saddles get heavier the longer they are carried.

Since all of the events had a two minute time limit, any team getting a no-time had 120 seconds added to their total time. Unsportsmanlike conduct could have led to an automatic disqualification, but the teams all played by the rules and their cowboy ethics.

Fast times in the events were: Trailer Race – TC Outfit, Vale, SD; Rope-Mug-Tying – White Performance Horses, Hot Springs, SD; Team Branding – White Performance Horses; Double Mugging – South Dakota Stockgrowers Association; and Range Horse Bronc Riding – Rabo AgriFinance, Faith, SD.

The competition was hot and heavy, with only four teams having a score in every event at the end of the fourth event. This lead to a real push in the Ranch Bronc Riding to get the best score, as the scores were that close. Going into the last event, the White Performance Horses team was in the lead, with TC Outfit in second, Rabo AgriFinance in third, and the Horseshoe Bar All Stars in fourth.

When the dust had settled and the points added up, the team of Rabo AgriFinance of Faith had pulled ahead and won the Ranch Rodeo. Their spectacular bronc ride and fast unsaddling and sprint had cinched it up with the fastest time of the Bronc Riding.

The Rabo AgriFinance team included: Captain, Chip Heidler of Faith, SD; O.J. Heidler of Opal, SD; Tye Hale of White Owl, SD; and Brett Wilcox of Red Owl, SD.

Second Place was White Performance Horses of Hot Springs with Hardy White of Hot Springs as Captain. The team also included Clint Hufty of Rapid City; Coy Thompson of Whitewood; and Clay Crago of Belle Fourche, SD.

Third was Horseshoe Bar All Stars of Scenic. Their captain was Joe Wilson of Kyle, SD; with Luke Newsam of Murdo, SD; Shaun Goodman of Kyle; and Jesse Wilson of Kyle, rounding out the team.

Fourth was 2009 Champs TC Outfit of Vale. Their captain was Travis Casteel of Vale, SD, and the remaining team members included Clint Hammerstrom of Hereford, SD, Kacy Wachob of Hay Springs, NE, and Buddy Darnell of Gordon, NE.

The coveted Top Hand Award was won by Hardy White of Hot Springs with Tye Hale’s horse winning the equally prized Top Horse Award.

It was an exciting good time to watch, and it shouldn’t take most of the contestants over two weeks to recover from all the fun they had. Their saddle horses are probably going to be puzzling over the whole thing for a little longer than that though.

The crowd pleasing Black Hills Stock Show Ranch Rodeo was held on Feb. 2 and drew a good crowd to watch the fast paced preliminary rounds during the day, followed by the finals that evening. Twelve teams made it to the finals, three of which had qualified for the 2009 finals as well.

Five events are held with the points from those events deciding the overall winner. Mutton Busting was also part of the Ranch Rodeo, but those points weren’t part of the team score. Events were Trailer Relay, Rope Mug Tying, Team Branding, Double Mugging and Ranch Bronc Riding, all with a two minute time limit.

The Trailer Relay features two pickups and trailers, parked opposite each other in the arena, with the pickups toward the center. Each team loads its saddled horses into one of the trailers, its riders in the cab of the pickup, and when the horn sounds, they bale out and race to the trailer to unload the horses. The first horse and rider takes the baton on a lap around the arena, wide open, and then hands the baton off to the second rider, and so on. The rider who is done with their lap loads their horse into the trailer, then waits to help the next one. Since there are two teams doing this at the same time, it’s a wild mount/dismount and horse race, with lots of horses and riders to potentially run into.

There are many near-misses as the opposing team has to get around the crowd at the back of the competition’s trailer. The last one on the relay generally rode his horse right into the trailer at full speed, with the rider grabbing the roof of the trailer and sliding off as the horse went in. The trailer door was slammed and the riders sprinted to the pickup, jumped in, slammed the doors and signaled “time” with the flash of headlights. Despite the event being much wilder and more dangerous than juggling chainsaws while running with scissors, no one, horse or cowboy, was hurt.

The Rope-Mug-Tying event featured numbered cattle at one end of the arena and the four person team on the other, both behind chalk lines. Each team entered the arena, the number was announced, and their time started when the team crosses the chalk line. They rode to the cattle, sorted out the correct number steer, and it was driven over the chalk line before it could be roped. Once it was across the line and roped, the other team members mugged the steer down onto his left side, and tied three legs. The timer stopped when the rope was off the steer’s head. The steer had to remain tied for six seconds after the rope was off his head.

Team Branding had two teams working at the same time, with separate stop watches running. Each team had a roper, two muggers, and a brander. The calves were held behind a line and mixed with some roping steers to make it more challenging. The roper rode into the bunch at a walk or trot, heeled a calf, and then logged him back across the line to the muggers who put him on his right side, and remove the rope. The brander then put a chalk “brand” on the left hip and the calf was released out into the main part of the arena. When the second calf was done, the branding iron was returned to the barrel and time was stopped. Any unnecessary roughness could have the team flagged out for a no-time.

The Double Mugging consisted of a roper, two muggers and one steer. The steer was in the roping chute with a 20 foot score and the barrier had a 20 second penalty for breaking it. The steer left the chute, then the rider roped him while two muggers ran out to grab the steer. One mugger pulled a ribbon off of the end of the steer’s tail and ran back to the roping chute while the other mugger pulled the head loop off. Surprisingly, many of the runners were back to the finish line before the rope was off of the steer’s head. Naturally, the steers didn’t cooperate any more than necessary during this event.

The final event was the Ranch Bronc Riding. The bronc rider provided his own stock saddle (no rodeo bronc riding saddles allowed) and a rope to put on the bronc halter. He could ride with one or two reins, and one or two hands. Each team served as its own pickup men as well and they waited behind a designated line. Time started when the horse left the bucking chute and the rider had to ride for six seconds, however he chose to do it. At the end of six seconds, the rest of the team could ride out to help him. They had to get the saddle and flank off of the horse and return the saddle, on foot, to a chalk circle at the front of the bucking chutes. This sounds fairly simple, but, the broncs were unwilling to let the cowboys have the saddle back when they were done bucking. The unsaddling of a saddle bronc is much more difficult than riding one, as it turns out, and saddles get heavier the longer they are carried.

Since all of the events had a two minute time limit, any team getting a no-time had 120 seconds added to their total time. Unsportsmanlike conduct could have led to an automatic disqualification, but the teams all played by the rules and their cowboy ethics.

Fast times in the events were: Trailer Race – TC Outfit, Vale, SD; Rope-Mug-Tying – White Performance Horses, Hot Springs, SD; Team Branding – White Performance Horses; Double Mugging – South Dakota Stockgrowers Association; and Range Horse Bronc Riding – Rabo AgriFinance, Faith, SD.

The competition was hot and heavy, with only four teams having a score in every event at the end of the fourth event. This lead to a real push in the Ranch Bronc Riding to get the best score, as the scores were that close. Going into the last event, the White Performance Horses team was in the lead, with TC Outfit in second, Rabo AgriFinance in third, and the Horseshoe Bar All Stars in fourth.

When the dust had settled and the points added up, the team of Rabo AgriFinance of Faith had pulled ahead and won the Ranch Rodeo. Their spectacular bronc ride and fast unsaddling and sprint had cinched it up with the fastest time of the Bronc Riding.

The Rabo AgriFinance team included: Captain, Chip Heidler of Faith, SD; O.J. Heidler of Opal, SD; Tye Hale of White Owl, SD; and Brett Wilcox of Red Owl, SD.

Second Place was White Performance Horses of Hot Springs with Hardy White of Hot Springs as Captain. The team also included Clint Hufty of Rapid City; Coy Thompson of Whitewood; and Clay Crago of Belle Fourche, SD.

Third was Horseshoe Bar All Stars of Scenic. Their captain was Joe Wilson of Kyle, SD; with Luke Newsam of Murdo, SD; Shaun Goodman of Kyle; and Jesse Wilson of Kyle, rounding out the team.

Fourth was 2009 Champs TC Outfit of Vale. Their captain was Travis Casteel of Vale, SD, and the remaining team members included Clint Hammerstrom of Hereford, SD, Kacy Wachob of Hay Springs, NE, and Buddy Darnell of Gordon, NE.

The coveted Top Hand Award was won by Hardy White of Hot Springs with Tye Hale’s horse winning the equally prized Top Horse Award.

It was an exciting good time to watch, and it shouldn’t take most of the contestants over two weeks to recover from all the fun they had. Their saddle horses are probably going to be puzzling over the whole thing for a little longer than that though.

The crowd pleasing Black Hills Stock Show Ranch Rodeo was held on Feb. 2 and drew a good crowd to watch the fast paced preliminary rounds during the day, followed by the finals that evening. Twelve teams made it to the finals, three of which had qualified for the 2009 finals as well.

Five events are held with the points from those events deciding the overall winner. Mutton Busting was also part of the Ranch Rodeo, but those points weren’t part of the team score. Events were Trailer Relay, Rope Mug Tying, Team Branding, Double Mugging and Ranch Bronc Riding, all with a two minute time limit.

The Trailer Relay features two pickups and trailers, parked opposite each other in the arena, with the pickups toward the center. Each team loads its saddled horses into one of the trailers, its riders in the cab of the pickup, and when the horn sounds, they bale out and race to the trailer to unload the horses. The first horse and rider takes the baton on a lap around the arena, wide open, and then hands the baton off to the second rider, and so on. The rider who is done with their lap loads their horse into the trailer, then waits to help the next one. Since there are two teams doing this at the same time, it’s a wild mount/dismount and horse race, with lots of horses and riders to potentially run into.

There are many near-misses as the opposing team has to get around the crowd at the back of the competition’s trailer. The last one on the relay generally rode his horse right into the trailer at full speed, with the rider grabbing the roof of the trailer and sliding off as the horse went in. The trailer door was slammed and the riders sprinted to the pickup, jumped in, slammed the doors and signaled “time” with the flash of headlights. Despite the event being much wilder and more dangerous than juggling chainsaws while running with scissors, no one, horse or cowboy, was hurt.

The Rope-Mug-Tying event featured numbered cattle at one end of the arena and the four person team on the other, both behind chalk lines. Each team entered the arena, the number was announced, and their time started when the team crosses the chalk line. They rode to the cattle, sorted out the correct number steer, and it was driven over the chalk line before it could be roped. Once it was across the line and roped, the other team members mugged the steer down onto his left side, and tied three legs. The timer stopped when the rope was off the steer’s head. The steer had to remain tied for six seconds after the rope was off his head.

Team Branding had two teams working at the same time, with separate stop watches running. Each team had a roper, two muggers, and a brander. The calves were held behind a line and mixed with some roping steers to make it more challenging. The roper rode into the bunch at a walk or trot, heeled a calf, and then logged him back across the line to the muggers who put him on his right side, and remove the rope. The brander then put a chalk “brand” on the left hip and the calf was released out into the main part of the arena. When the second calf was done, the branding iron was returned to the barrel and time was stopped. Any unnecessary roughness could have the team flagged out for a no-time.

The Double Mugging consisted of a roper, two muggers and one steer. The steer was in the roping chute with a 20 foot score and the barrier had a 20 second penalty for breaking it. The steer left the chute, then the rider roped him while two muggers ran out to grab the steer. One mugger pulled a ribbon off of the end of the steer’s tail and ran back to the roping chute while the other mugger pulled the head loop off. Surprisingly, many of the runners were back to the finish line before the rope was off of the steer’s head. Naturally, the steers didn’t cooperate any more than necessary during this event.

The final event was the Ranch Bronc Riding. The bronc rider provided his own stock saddle (no rodeo bronc riding saddles allowed) and a rope to put on the bronc halter. He could ride with one or two reins, and one or two hands. Each team served as its own pickup men as well and they waited behind a designated line. Time started when the horse left the bucking chute and the rider had to ride for six seconds, however he chose to do it. At the end of six seconds, the rest of the team could ride out to help him. They had to get the saddle and flank off of the horse and return the saddle, on foot, to a chalk circle at the front of the bucking chutes. This sounds fairly simple, but, the broncs were unwilling to let the cowboys have the saddle back when they were done bucking. The unsaddling of a saddle bronc is much more difficult than riding one, as it turns out, and saddles get heavier the longer they are carried.

Since all of the events had a two minute time limit, any team getting a no-time had 120 seconds added to their total time. Unsportsmanlike conduct could have led to an automatic disqualification, but the teams all played by the rules and their cowboy ethics.

Fast times in the events were: Trailer Race – TC Outfit, Vale, SD; Rope-Mug-Tying – White Performance Horses, Hot Springs, SD; Team Branding – White Performance Horses; Double Mugging – South Dakota Stockgrowers Association; and Range Horse Bronc Riding – Rabo AgriFinance, Faith, SD.

The competition was hot and heavy, with only four teams having a score in every event at the end of the fourth event. This lead to a real push in the Ranch Bronc Riding to get the best score, as the scores were that close. Going into the last event, the White Performance Horses team was in the lead, with TC Outfit in second, Rabo AgriFinance in third, and the Horseshoe Bar All Stars in fourth.

When the dust had settled and the points added up, the team of Rabo AgriFinance of Faith had pulled ahead and won the Ranch Rodeo. Their spectacular bronc ride and fast unsaddling and sprint had cinched it up with the fastest time of the Bronc Riding.

The Rabo AgriFinance team included: Captain, Chip Heidler of Faith, SD; O.J. Heidler of Opal, SD; Tye Hale of White Owl, SD; and Brett Wilcox of Red Owl, SD.

Second Place was White Performance Horses of Hot Springs with Hardy White of Hot Springs as Captain. The team also included Clint Hufty of Rapid City; Coy Thompson of Whitewood; and Clay Crago of Belle Fourche, SD.

Third was Horseshoe Bar All Stars of Scenic. Their captain was Joe Wilson of Kyle, SD; with Luke Newsam of Murdo, SD; Shaun Goodman of Kyle; and Jesse Wilson of Kyle, rounding out the team.

Fourth was 2009 Champs TC Outfit of Vale. Their captain was Travis Casteel of Vale, SD, and the remaining team members included Clint Hammerstrom of Hereford, SD, Kacy Wachob of Hay Springs, NE, and Buddy Darnell of Gordon, NE.

The coveted Top Hand Award was won by Hardy White of Hot Springs with Tye Hale’s horse winning the equally prized Top Horse Award.

It was an exciting good time to watch, and it shouldn’t take most of the contestants over two weeks to recover from all the fun they had. Their saddle horses are probably going to be puzzling over the whole thing for a little longer than that though.

The crowd pleasing Black Hills Stock Show Ranch Rodeo was held on Feb. 2 and drew a good crowd to watch the fast paced preliminary rounds during the day, followed by the finals that evening. Twelve teams made it to the finals, three of which had qualified for the 2009 finals as well.

Five events are held with the points from those events deciding the overall winner. Mutton Busting was also part of the Ranch Rodeo, but those points weren’t part of the team score. Events were Trailer Relay, Rope Mug Tying, Team Branding, Double Mugging and Ranch Bronc Riding, all with a two minute time limit.

The Trailer Relay features two pickups and trailers, parked opposite each other in the arena, with the pickups toward the center. Each team loads its saddled horses into one of the trailers, its riders in the cab of the pickup, and when the horn sounds, they bale out and race to the trailer to unload the horses. The first horse and rider takes the baton on a lap around the arena, wide open, and then hands the baton off to the second rider, and so on. The rider who is done with their lap loads their horse into the trailer, then waits to help the next one. Since there are two teams doing this at the same time, it’s a wild mount/dismount and horse race, with lots of horses and riders to potentially run into.

There are many near-misses as the opposing team has to get around the crowd at the back of the competition’s trailer. The last one on the relay generally rode his horse right into the trailer at full speed, with the rider grabbing the roof of the trailer and sliding off as the horse went in. The trailer door was slammed and the riders sprinted to the pickup, jumped in, slammed the doors and signaled “time” with the flash of headlights. Despite the event being much wilder and more dangerous than juggling chainsaws while running with scissors, no one, horse or cowboy, was hurt.

The Rope-Mug-Tying event featured numbered cattle at one end of the arena and the four person team on the other, both behind chalk lines. Each team entered the arena, the number was announced, and their time started when the team crosses the chalk line. They rode to the cattle, sorted out the correct number steer, and it was driven over the chalk line before it could be roped. Once it was across the line and roped, the other team members mugged the steer down onto his left side, and tied three legs. The timer stopped when the rope was off the steer’s head. The steer had to remain tied for six seconds after the rope was off his head.

Team Branding had two teams working at the same time, with separate stop watches running. Each team had a roper, two muggers, and a brander. The calves were held behind a line and mixed with some roping steers to make it more challenging. The roper rode into the bunch at a walk or trot, heeled a calf, and then logged him back across the line to the muggers who put him on his right side, and remove the rope. The brander then put a chalk “brand” on the left hip and the calf was released out into the main part of the arena. When the second calf was done, the branding iron was returned to the barrel and time was stopped. Any unnecessary roughness could have the team flagged out for a no-time.

The Double Mugging consisted of a roper, two muggers and one steer. The steer was in the roping chute with a 20 foot score and the barrier had a 20 second penalty for breaking it. The steer left the chute, then the rider roped him while two muggers ran out to grab the steer. One mugger pulled a ribbon off of the end of the steer’s tail and ran back to the roping chute while the other mugger pulled the head loop off. Surprisingly, many of the runners were back to the finish line before the rope was off of the steer’s head. Naturally, the steers didn’t cooperate any more than necessary during this event.

The final event was the Ranch Bronc Riding. The bronc rider provided his own stock saddle (no rodeo bronc riding saddles allowed) and a rope to put on the bronc halter. He could ride with one or two reins, and one or two hands. Each team served as its own pickup men as well and they waited behind a designated line. Time started when the horse left the bucking chute and the rider had to ride for six seconds, however he chose to do it. At the end of six seconds, the rest of the team could ride out to help him. They had to get the saddle and flank off of the horse and return the saddle, on foot, to a chalk circle at the front of the bucking chutes. This sounds fairly simple, but, the broncs were unwilling to let the cowboys have the saddle back when they were done bucking. The unsaddling of a saddle bronc is much more difficult than riding one, as it turns out, and saddles get heavier the longer they are carried.

Since all of the events had a two minute time limit, any team getting a no-time had 120 seconds added to their total time. Unsportsmanlike conduct could have led to an automatic disqualification, but the teams all played by the rules and their cowboy ethics.

Fast times in the events were: Trailer Race – TC Outfit, Vale, SD; Rope-Mug-Tying – White Performance Horses, Hot Springs, SD; Team Branding – White Performance Horses; Double Mugging – South Dakota Stockgrowers Association; and Range Horse Bronc Riding – Rabo AgriFinance, Faith, SD.

The competition was hot and heavy, with only four teams having a score in every event at the end of the fourth event. This lead to a real push in the Ranch Bronc Riding to get the best score, as the scores were that close. Going into the last event, the White Performance Horses team was in the lead, with TC Outfit in second, Rabo AgriFinance in third, and the Horseshoe Bar All Stars in fourth.

When the dust had settled and the points added up, the team of Rabo AgriFinance of Faith had pulled ahead and won the Ranch Rodeo. Their spectacular bronc ride and fast unsaddling and sprint had cinched it up with the fastest time of the Bronc Riding.

The Rabo AgriFinance team included: Captain, Chip Heidler of Faith, SD; O.J. Heidler of Opal, SD; Tye Hale of White Owl, SD; and Brett Wilcox of Red Owl, SD.

Second Place was White Performance Horses of Hot Springs with Hardy White of Hot Springs as Captain. The team also included Clint Hufty of Rapid City; Coy Thompson of Whitewood; and Clay Crago of Belle Fourche, SD.

Third was Horseshoe Bar All Stars of Scenic. Their captain was Joe Wilson of Kyle, SD; with Luke Newsam of Murdo, SD; Shaun Goodman of Kyle; and Jesse Wilson of Kyle, rounding out the team.

Fourth was 2009 Champs TC Outfit of Vale. Their captain was Travis Casteel of Vale, SD, and the remaining team members included Clint Hammerstrom of Hereford, SD, Kacy Wachob of Hay Springs, NE, and Buddy Darnell of Gordon, NE.

The coveted Top Hand Award was won by Hardy White of Hot Springs with Tye Hale’s horse winning the equally prized Top Horse Award.

It was an exciting good time to watch, and it shouldn’t take most of the contestants over two weeks to recover from all the fun they had. Their saddle horses are probably going to be puzzling over the whole thing for a little longer than that though.

The crowd pleasing Black Hills Stock Show Ranch Rodeo was held on Feb. 2 and drew a good crowd to watch the fast paced preliminary rounds during the day, followed by the finals that evening. Twelve teams made it to the finals, three of which had qualified for the 2009 finals as well.

Five events are held with the points from those events deciding the overall winner. Mutton Busting was also part of the Ranch Rodeo, but those points weren’t part of the team score. Events were Trailer Relay, Rope Mug Tying, Team Branding, Double Mugging and Ranch Bronc Riding, all with a two minute time limit.

The Trailer Relay features two pickups and trailers, parked opposite each other in the arena, with the pickups toward the center. Each team loads its saddled horses into one of the trailers, its riders in the cab of the pickup, and when the horn sounds, they bale out and race to the trailer to unload the horses. The first horse and rider takes the baton on a lap around the arena, wide open, and then hands the baton off to the second rider, and so on. The rider who is done with their lap loads their horse into the trailer, then waits to help the next one. Since there are two teams doing this at the same time, it’s a wild mount/dismount and horse race, with lots of horses and riders to potentially run into.

There are many near-misses as the opposing team has to get around the crowd at the back of the competition’s trailer. The last one on the relay generally rode his horse right into the trailer at full speed, with the rider grabbing the roof of the trailer and sliding off as the horse went in. The trailer door was slammed and the riders sprinted to the pickup, jumped in, slammed the doors and signaled “time” with the flash of headlights. Despite the event being much wilder and more dangerous than juggling chainsaws while running with scissors, no one, horse or cowboy, was hurt.

The Rope-Mug-Tying event featured numbered cattle at one end of the arena and the four person team on the other, both behind chalk lines. Each team entered the arena, the number was announced, and their time started when the team crosses the chalk line. They rode to the cattle, sorted out the correct number steer, and it was driven over the chalk line before it could be roped. Once it was across the line and roped, the other team members mugged the steer down onto his left side, and tied three legs. The timer stopped when the rope was off the steer’s head. The steer had to remain tied for six seconds after the rope was off his head.

Team Branding had two teams working at the same time, with separate stop watches running. Each team had a roper, two muggers, and a brander. The calves were held behind a line and mixed with some roping steers to make it more challenging. The roper rode into the bunch at a walk or trot, heeled a calf, and then logged him back across the line to the muggers who put him on his right side, and remove the rope. The brander then put a chalk “brand” on the left hip and the calf was released out into the main part of the arena. When the second calf was done, the branding iron was returned to the barrel and time was stopped. Any unnecessary roughness could have the team flagged out for a no-time.

The Double Mugging consisted of a roper, two muggers and one steer. The steer was in the roping chute with a 20 foot score and the barrier had a 20 second penalty for breaking it. The steer left the chute, then the rider roped him while two muggers ran out to grab the steer. One mugger pulled a ribbon off of the end of the steer’s tail and ran back to the roping chute while the other mugger pulled the head loop off. Surprisingly, many of the runners were back to the finish line before the rope was off of the steer’s head. Naturally, the steers didn’t cooperate any more than necessary during this event.

The final event was the Ranch Bronc Riding. The bronc rider provided his own stock saddle (no rodeo bronc riding saddles allowed) and a rope to put on the bronc halter. He could ride with one or two reins, and one or two hands. Each team served as its own pickup men as well and they waited behind a designated line. Time started when the horse left the bucking chute and the rider had to ride for six seconds, however he chose to do it. At the end of six seconds, the rest of the team could ride out to help him. They had to get the saddle and flank off of the horse and return the saddle, on foot, to a chalk circle at the front of the bucking chutes. This sounds fairly simple, but, the broncs were unwilling to let the cowboys have the saddle back when they were done bucking. The unsaddling of a saddle bronc is much more difficult than riding one, as it turns out, and saddles get heavier the longer they are carried.

Since all of the events had a two minute time limit, any team getting a no-time had 120 seconds added to their total time. Unsportsmanlike conduct could have led to an automatic disqualification, but the teams all played by the rules and their cowboy ethics.

Fast times in the events were: Trailer Race – TC Outfit, Vale, SD; Rope-Mug-Tying – White Performance Horses, Hot Springs, SD; Team Branding – White Performance Horses; Double Mugging – South Dakota Stockgrowers Association; and Range Horse Bronc Riding – Rabo AgriFinance, Faith, SD.

The competition was hot and heavy, with only four teams having a score in every event at the end of the fourth event. This lead to a real push in the Ranch Bronc Riding to get the best score, as the scores were that close. Going into the last event, the White Performance Horses team was in the lead, with TC Outfit in second, Rabo AgriFinance in third, and the Horseshoe Bar All Stars in fourth.

When the dust had settled and the points added up, the team of Rabo AgriFinance of Faith had pulled ahead and won the Ranch Rodeo. Their spectacular bronc ride and fast unsaddling and sprint had cinched it up with the fastest time of the Bronc Riding.

The Rabo AgriFinance team included: Captain, Chip Heidler of Faith, SD; O.J. Heidler of Opal, SD; Tye Hale of White Owl, SD; and Brett Wilcox of Red Owl, SD.

Second Place was White Performance Horses of Hot Springs with Hardy White of Hot Springs as Captain. The team also included Clint Hufty of Rapid City; Coy Thompson of Whitewood; and Clay Crago of Belle Fourche, SD.

Third was Horseshoe Bar All Stars of Scenic. Their captain was Joe Wilson of Kyle, SD; with Luke Newsam of Murdo, SD; Shaun Goodman of Kyle; and Jesse Wilson of Kyle, rounding out the team.

Fourth was 2009 Champs TC Outfit of Vale. Their captain was Travis Casteel of Vale, SD, and the remaining team members included Clint Hammerstrom of Hereford, SD, Kacy Wachob of Hay Springs, NE, and Buddy Darnell of Gordon, NE.

The coveted Top Hand Award was won by Hardy White of Hot Springs with Tye Hale’s horse winning the equally prized Top Horse Award.

It was an exciting good time to watch, and it shouldn’t take most of the contestants over two weeks to recover from all the fun they had. Their saddle horses are probably going to be puzzling over the whole thing for a little longer than that though.

The crowd pleasing Black Hills Stock Show Ranch Rodeo was held on Feb. 2 and drew a good crowd to watch the fast paced preliminary rounds during the day, followed by the finals that evening. Twelve teams made it to the finals, three of which had qualified for the 2009 finals as well.

Five events are held with the points from those events deciding the overall winner. Mutton Busting was also part of the Ranch Rodeo, but those points weren’t part of the team score. Events were Trailer Relay, Rope Mug Tying, Team Branding, Double Mugging and Ranch Bronc Riding, all with a two minute time limit.

The Trailer Relay features two pickups and trailers, parked opposite each other in the arena, with the pickups toward the center. Each team loads its saddled horses into one of the trailers, its riders in the cab of the pickup, and when the horn sounds, they bale out and race to the trailer to unload the horses. The first horse and rider takes the baton on a lap around the arena, wide open, and then hands the baton off to the second rider, and so on. The rider who is done with their lap loads their horse into the trailer, then waits to help the next one. Since there are two teams doing this at the same time, it’s a wild mount/dismount and horse race, with lots of horses and riders to potentially run into.

There are many near-misses as the opposing team has to get around the crowd at the back of the competition’s trailer. The last one on the relay generally rode his horse right into the trailer at full speed, with the rider grabbing the roof of the trailer and sliding off as the horse went in. The trailer door was slammed and the riders sprinted to the pickup, jumped in, slammed the doors and signaled “time” with the flash of headlights. Despite the event being much wilder and more dangerous than juggling chainsaws while running with scissors, no one, horse or cowboy, was hurt.

The Rope-Mug-Tying event featured numbered cattle at one end of the arena and the four person team on the other, both behind chalk lines. Each team entered the arena, the number was announced, and their time started when the team crosses the chalk line. They rode to the cattle, sorted out the correct number steer, and it was driven over the chalk line before it could be roped. Once it was across the line and roped, the other team members mugged the steer down onto his left side, and tied three legs. The timer stopped when the rope was off the steer’s head. The steer had to remain tied for six seconds after the rope was off his head.

Team Branding had two teams working at the same time, with separate stop watches running. Each team had a roper, two muggers, and a brander. The calves were held behind a line and mixed with some roping steers to make it more challenging. The roper rode into the bunch at a walk or trot, heeled a calf, and then logged him back across the line to the muggers who put him on his right side, and remove the rope. The brander then put a chalk “brand” on the left hip and the calf was released out into the main part of the arena. When the second calf was done, the branding iron was returned to the barrel and time was stopped. Any unnecessary roughness could have the team flagged out for a no-time.

The Double Mugging consisted of a roper, two muggers and one steer. The steer was in the roping chute with a 20 foot score and the barrier had a 20 second penalty for breaking it. The steer left the chute, then the rider roped him while two muggers ran out to grab the steer. One mugger pulled a ribbon off of the end of the steer’s tail and ran back to the roping chute while the other mugger pulled the head loop off. Surprisingly, many of the runners were back to the finish line before the rope was off of the steer’s head. Naturally, the steers didn’t cooperate any more than necessary during this event.

The final event was the Ranch Bronc Riding. The bronc rider provided his own stock saddle (no rodeo bronc riding saddles allowed) and a rope to put on the bronc halter. He could ride with one or two reins, and one or two hands. Each team served as its own pickup men as well and they waited behind a designated line. Time started when the horse left the bucking chute and the rider had to ride for six seconds, however he chose to do it. At the end of six seconds, the rest of the team could ride out to help him. They had to get the saddle and flank off of the horse and return the saddle, on foot, to a chalk circle at the front of the bucking chutes. This sounds fairly simple, but, the broncs were unwilling to let the cowboys have the saddle back when they were done bucking. The unsaddling of a saddle bronc is much more difficult than riding one, as it turns out, and saddles get heavier the longer they are carried.

Since all of the events had a two minute time limit, any team getting a no-time had 120 seconds added to their total time. Unsportsmanlike conduct could have led to an automatic disqualification, but the teams all played by the rules and their cowboy ethics.

Fast times in the events were: Trailer Race – TC Outfit, Vale, SD; Rope-Mug-Tying – White Performance Horses, Hot Springs, SD; Team Branding – White Performance Horses; Double Mugging – South Dakota Stockgrowers Association; and Range Horse Bronc Riding – Rabo AgriFinance, Faith, SD.

The competition was hot and heavy, with only four teams having a score in every event at the end of the fourth event. This lead to a real push in the Ranch Bronc Riding to get the best score, as the scores were that close. Going into the last event, the White Performance Horses team was in the lead, with TC Outfit in second, Rabo AgriFinance in third, and the Horseshoe Bar All Stars in fourth.

When the dust had settled and the points added up, the team of Rabo AgriFinance of Faith had pulled ahead and won the Ranch Rodeo. Their spectacular bronc ride and fast unsaddling and sprint had cinched it up with the fastest time of the Bronc Riding.

The Rabo AgriFinance team included: Captain, Chip Heidler of Faith, SD; O.J. Heidler of Opal, SD; Tye Hale of White Owl, SD; and Brett Wilcox of Red Owl, SD.

Second Place was White Performance Horses of Hot Springs with Hardy White of Hot Springs as Captain. The team also included Clint Hufty of Rapid City; Coy Thompson of Whitewood; and Clay Crago of Belle Fourche, SD.

Third was Horseshoe Bar All Stars of Scenic. Their captain was Joe Wilson of Kyle, SD; with Luke Newsam of Murdo, SD; Shaun Goodman of Kyle; and Jesse Wilson of Kyle, rounding out the team.

Fourth was 2009 Champs TC Outfit of Vale. Their captain was Travis Casteel of Vale, SD, and the remaining team members included Clint Hammerstrom of Hereford, SD, Kacy Wachob of Hay Springs, NE, and Buddy Darnell of Gordon, NE.

The coveted Top Hand Award was won by Hardy White of Hot Springs with Tye Hale’s horse winning the equally prized Top Horse Award.

It was an exciting good time to watch, and it shouldn’t take most of the contestants over two weeks to recover from all the fun they had. Their saddle horses are probably going to be puzzling over the whole thing for a little longer than that though.


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