Worth the wait | TSLN.com

Worth the wait

Loretta Sorensen

Photo by Loretta SorensenPat Steffen decided to raise Scottish Highland cattle when he learned that they were good at converting forage and were docile and hardy. All those characteristics fit well with his northeast Nebraska farm.

They grow slowly, but it’s worth the wait. That’s the philosophy Pat Steffen of Fordyce, NE has counted on since he began raising Scottish Highland cattle in 1999. Because the breed is fairly rare in Nebraska, Steffen raised some eyebrows when he pastured his first cows along the highway.

“What are those funny looking hairy cows? That’s the question everybody was asking,” Steffen said. “Some people thought I was a little over the edge when I first bought them, but they’re gaining popularity now because they’re pretty easy to produce and their meat is really good for health conscious people.”

Steffen, whose family farm is now certified organic, makes the most of the native grasses growing on the rolling hills of his northeast Nebraska home to feed his herd of 25 cows and 27 or so one- and two-year-old steers. He finds that they do a good job of converting his forage to a tasty meat.

They grow slowly, but it’s worth the wait. That’s the philosophy Pat Steffen of Fordyce, NE has counted on since he began raising Scottish Highland cattle in 1999. Because the breed is fairly rare in Nebraska, Steffen raised some eyebrows when he pastured his first cows along the highway.

“What are those funny looking hairy cows? That’s the question everybody was asking,” Steffen said. “Some people thought I was a little over the edge when I first bought them, but they’re gaining popularity now because they’re pretty easy to produce and their meat is really good for health conscious people.”

Steffen, whose family farm is now certified organic, makes the most of the native grasses growing on the rolling hills of his northeast Nebraska home to feed his herd of 25 cows and 27 or so one- and two-year-old steers. He finds that they do a good job of converting his forage to a tasty meat.

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They grow slowly, but it’s worth the wait. That’s the philosophy Pat Steffen of Fordyce, NE has counted on since he began raising Scottish Highland cattle in 1999. Because the breed is fairly rare in Nebraska, Steffen raised some eyebrows when he pastured his first cows along the highway.

“What are those funny looking hairy cows? That’s the question everybody was asking,” Steffen said. “Some people thought I was a little over the edge when I first bought them, but they’re gaining popularity now because they’re pretty easy to produce and their meat is really good for health conscious people.”

Steffen, whose family farm is now certified organic, makes the most of the native grasses growing on the rolling hills of his northeast Nebraska home to feed his herd of 25 cows and 27 or so one- and two-year-old steers. He finds that they do a good job of converting his forage to a tasty meat.

They grow slowly, but it’s worth the wait. That’s the philosophy Pat Steffen of Fordyce, NE has counted on since he began raising Scottish Highland cattle in 1999. Because the breed is fairly rare in Nebraska, Steffen raised some eyebrows when he pastured his first cows along the highway.

“What are those funny looking hairy cows? That’s the question everybody was asking,” Steffen said. “Some people thought I was a little over the edge when I first bought them, but they’re gaining popularity now because they’re pretty easy to produce and their meat is really good for health conscious people.”

Steffen, whose family farm is now certified organic, makes the most of the native grasses growing on the rolling hills of his northeast Nebraska home to feed his herd of 25 cows and 27 or so one- and two-year-old steers. He finds that they do a good job of converting his forage to a tasty meat.

They grow slowly, but it’s worth the wait. That’s the philosophy Pat Steffen of Fordyce, NE has counted on since he began raising Scottish Highland cattle in 1999. Because the breed is fairly rare in Nebraska, Steffen raised some eyebrows when he pastured his first cows along the highway.

“What are those funny looking hairy cows? That’s the question everybody was asking,” Steffen said. “Some people thought I was a little over the edge when I first bought them, but they’re gaining popularity now because they’re pretty easy to produce and their meat is really good for health conscious people.”

Steffen, whose family farm is now certified organic, makes the most of the native grasses growing on the rolling hills of his northeast Nebraska home to feed his herd of 25 cows and 27 or so one- and two-year-old steers. He finds that they do a good job of converting his forage to a tasty meat.