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Wyoming: Conservation Easement Conference June 2

LARAMIE, WY – Professionals can gain knowledge in the growing field of conservation easements at the 2011 Wyoming Conservation Easement Conference. The conference is a unique learning opportunity featuring expert lectures and panel presentations on a diverse range of topics relating to conservation easement transactions.

Presented by The University of Wyoming College of Law Rural Law Center, in partnership with the Jackson Hole Land Trust and the Wyoming Stock Growers Agricultural Land Trust, the conference is Thursday, June 2 at the University of Wyoming College of Law in Laramie, WY.

“The conference is a special opportunity for Wyoming professionals and others interested in land conservation to gain in-depth knowledge about the complexities and benefits of conservation easements,” Jackson Hole Land Trust Executive Director Laurie Andrews said.

Conservation easements are legal, voluntary agreements between landowners and qualified conservation organizations which permanently restrict the type and amount of development that occurs on private property. They have grown in popularity in recent years for several reasons. The landowner population in Wyoming is ageing and conservation easements are a valuable estate planning tool. There are increased public and private dollars available for purchased easements of which some landowners choose to take advantage, as well as the extension of the federal enhanced tax incentives for landowners entering into conservation easements.

These benefits have triggered an increasing number of landowners to turn to their attorneys, accountants, appraisers, planners and realtors for advice about how conservation easements can benefit their families, lands and agricultural operations.

“Conservation easements may help landowners reduce estate or income-tax burdens, keep land in the family and ensure ranches and farms remain intact and productive,” Stock Growers Land Trust Executive Director Pamela Dewell said. “There is also a trend in Wyoming toward conservation easements becoming more ag friendly. There is more awareness about the value of private agricultural lands – they are our most productive lands and they also support migration corridors, breeding grounds and habitat for game and sensitive species like the sage grouse.”

The 2011 Wyoming Conservation Easement Conference topics are covered by a diverse faculty of experts and will include conservation easement basics, contributions and sales, appraisal issues, tax incentives, energy development, ethics and more.

The full-day conference is certified for continuing education credits through the American Institute of Certified Planners, the Wyoming Bar Association and the Wyoming Real Estate Commission. Registration for the conference is $100 and includes lunch thanks to the generous sponsorship of the Heart of the Rockies Initiative, Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment & Natural Resources, Davis & Cannon LLP, McGee Hearne & Paiz LLP, Rocky Mountain Appraisals and Western United Realty LLC.

For a complete conference agenda, registration and lodging information, please visit http://www.uwyo.edu/law/rural-law-center/conservation-easement-conference.

LARAMIE, WY – Professionals can gain knowledge in the growing field of conservation easements at the 2011 Wyoming Conservation Easement Conference. The conference is a unique learning opportunity featuring expert lectures and panel presentations on a diverse range of topics relating to conservation easement transactions.

Presented by The University of Wyoming College of Law Rural Law Center, in partnership with the Jackson Hole Land Trust and the Wyoming Stock Growers Agricultural Land Trust, the conference is Thursday, June 2 at the University of Wyoming College of Law in Laramie, WY.

“The conference is a special opportunity for Wyoming professionals and others interested in land conservation to gain in-depth knowledge about the complexities and benefits of conservation easements,” Jackson Hole Land Trust Executive Director Laurie Andrews said.

Conservation easements are legal, voluntary agreements between landowners and qualified conservation organizations which permanently restrict the type and amount of development that occurs on private property. They have grown in popularity in recent years for several reasons. The landowner population in Wyoming is ageing and conservation easements are a valuable estate planning tool. There are increased public and private dollars available for purchased easements of which some landowners choose to take advantage, as well as the extension of the federal enhanced tax incentives for landowners entering into conservation easements.

These benefits have triggered an increasing number of landowners to turn to their attorneys, accountants, appraisers, planners and realtors for advice about how conservation easements can benefit their families, lands and agricultural operations.

“Conservation easements may help landowners reduce estate or income-tax burdens, keep land in the family and ensure ranches and farms remain intact and productive,” Stock Growers Land Trust Executive Director Pamela Dewell said. “There is also a trend in Wyoming toward conservation easements becoming more ag friendly. There is more awareness about the value of private agricultural lands – they are our most productive lands and they also support migration corridors, breeding grounds and habitat for game and sensitive species like the sage grouse.”

The 2011 Wyoming Conservation Easement Conference topics are covered by a diverse faculty of experts and will include conservation easement basics, contributions and sales, appraisal issues, tax incentives, energy development, ethics and more.

The full-day conference is certified for continuing education credits through the American Institute of Certified Planners, the Wyoming Bar Association and the Wyoming Real Estate Commission. Registration for the conference is $100 and includes lunch thanks to the generous sponsorship of the Heart of the Rockies Initiative, Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment & Natural Resources, Davis & Cannon LLP, McGee Hearne & Paiz LLP, Rocky Mountain Appraisals and Western United Realty LLC.

For a complete conference agenda, registration and lodging information, please visit http://www.uwyo.edu/law/rural-law-center/conservation-easement-conference.


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