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Wyoming eyed as site of new horse processing plant

Wyoming could be the site of a new horse processing plant, according to State Rep. Sue Wallis, who’s also vice president of the pro-processing plant group, United Horsemen. She said recently her group formed the company Unified Equine to explore the creation of a horse meat processing plant in Wyoming.

The possibility only opened up Nov. 18, when President Barack Obama signed an agriculture spending bill, which did not contain language in earlier spending bills prohibiting USDA inspections for horse processing plants.

It will take 30-90 days, minimum, before any horse slaughter plant could open in the U.S. because of regulations, Wallis said. In Wyoming, it will take even longer because there aren’t existing sites that could reopen.



“It’s fairly certain we will not be the first state to have one open,” Wallis said.

But Wallis expects Wyoming will eventually have at least one plant. Her group initially looked at the feasibility of building a multi-purpose slaughterhouse for cattle, bison and horses, Wallis said. The group tabled those plans, first choosing to work to get the federal government to allow the needed inspections. Now the original plans are in motion.



Wyoming could be the site of a new horse processing plant, according to State Rep. Sue Wallis, who’s also vice president of the pro-processing plant group, United Horsemen. She said recently her group formed the company Unified Equine to explore the creation of a horse meat processing plant in Wyoming.

The possibility only opened up Nov. 18, when President Barack Obama signed an agriculture spending bill, which did not contain language in earlier spending bills prohibiting USDA inspections for horse processing plants.

It will take 30-90 days, minimum, before any horse slaughter plant could open in the U.S. because of regulations, Wallis said. In Wyoming, it will take even longer because there aren’t existing sites that could reopen.

“It’s fairly certain we will not be the first state to have one open,” Wallis said.

But Wallis expects Wyoming will eventually have at least one plant. Her group initially looked at the feasibility of building a multi-purpose slaughterhouse for cattle, bison and horses, Wallis said. The group tabled those plans, first choosing to work to get the federal government to allow the needed inspections. Now the original plans are in motion.


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