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Wyoming Mercantile draws tremendous crowd at State Fair

The building looks like something straight out of an old Clint Eastwood movie. The dark brown wooden building resembling an old west general store stands in the middle of the Midway drawing much curiosity from passerby, who wonder what goods await them as they pass through the front door. The smell of fresh baked bread permeates the air, while baskets of soaps, and displays of jewelry, foods, lamps, pottery and other goods give visitors a true feeling of an old western general store.

The Wyoming Mercantile made its first appearance on the Midway at the Wyoming State Fair earlier this week. Since the doors first opened, there has been a steady stream of customers curious about what the store holds, said Kim Porter, who is the farmers market and education program manager with the Wyoming Business Council.

“We have had the Wyoming Products display at Fort Fedderman at the Wyoming State Fair for the last 10 years,” Porter explained. “Fort Fedderman is up on the hill by the office and away from the main part of the State Fair. For years, we have been trying to find a way to be on the Midway where the shoppers are.”



A few years ago, the Wyoming Business Council set aside funding to build the store and place it on the Midway. “We decided to find a design for an old west store, so we looked at different designs on the Internet,” she explained. “Once we found one we liked, we had an architect draw up the plans, and we had this building built.”

Inside the building, over 60 artisans have brought a wide variety of Wyoming-made products at a variety of price ranges. “The store has been quite a draw since the fair began earlier in the week,” Porter continued. “We have had probably 10 times the foot traffic we had in the old location. Having our own building has made it easier to stage things, and showcase some of our artists’ products.”



When a visitor steps through the door, some of the more unique products are wooden wine bottle corks, pottery made with horse hair, unique jewelry and a variety of tasty Wyoming foods. “What is unique about the store is all of the products are made in Wyoming by artisans,” she said. “This store is an opportunity for them to show off their talents.”

Next year, Porter said they have plans to utilize the outside of the building, too. “We are planning to display some of the artisans’ outside art products, in addition to holding demonstrations,” she said. Demonstrations from wool spinning, felting and saddlemaking to butter churning and making homemade ice cream are possibilities for next year’s state fair. “I have already started working with some of the vendors to bring in some demonstrations,” she added. “The vendors are very pleased with how the items are displayed in the store, and are eager to help make next year’s store even better.”

For more information on the Wyoming-made products that can be found in the Wyoming Mercantile, visit wyomingfirst.org. Porter can reached at 307-777-6319.

The building looks like something straight out of an old Clint Eastwood movie. The dark brown wooden building resembling an old west general store stands in the middle of the Midway drawing much curiosity from passerby, who wonder what goods await them as they pass through the front door. The smell of fresh baked bread permeates the air, while baskets of soaps, and displays of jewelry, foods, lamps, pottery and other goods give visitors a true feeling of an old western general store.

The Wyoming Mercantile made its first appearance on the Midway at the Wyoming State Fair earlier this week. Since the doors first opened, there has been a steady stream of customers curious about what the store holds, said Kim Porter, who is the farmers market and education program manager with the Wyoming Business Council.

“We have had the Wyoming Products display at Fort Fedderman at the Wyoming State Fair for the last 10 years,” Porter explained. “Fort Fedderman is up on the hill by the office and away from the main part of the State Fair. For years, we have been trying to find a way to be on the Midway where the shoppers are.”

A few years ago, the Wyoming Business Council set aside funding to build the store and place it on the Midway. “We decided to find a design for an old west store, so we looked at different designs on the Internet,” she explained. “Once we found one we liked, we had an architect draw up the plans, and we had this building built.”

Inside the building, over 60 artisans have brought a wide variety of Wyoming-made products at a variety of price ranges. “The store has been quite a draw since the fair began earlier in the week,” Porter continued. “We have had probably 10 times the foot traffic we had in the old location. Having our own building has made it easier to stage things, and showcase some of our artists’ products.”

When a visitor steps through the door, some of the more unique products are wooden wine bottle corks, pottery made with horse hair, unique jewelry and a variety of tasty Wyoming foods. “What is unique about the store is all of the products are made in Wyoming by artisans,” she said. “This store is an opportunity for them to show off their talents.”

Next year, Porter said they have plans to utilize the outside of the building, too. “We are planning to display some of the artisans’ outside art products, in addition to holding demonstrations,” she said. Demonstrations from wool spinning, felting and saddlemaking to butter churning and making homemade ice cream are possibilities for next year’s state fair. “I have already started working with some of the vendors to bring in some demonstrations,” she added. “The vendors are very pleased with how the items are displayed in the store, and are eager to help make next year’s store even better.”

For more information on the Wyoming-made products that can be found in the Wyoming Mercantile, visit wyomingfirst.org. Porter can reached at 307-777-6319.

The building looks like something straight out of an old Clint Eastwood movie. The dark brown wooden building resembling an old west general store stands in the middle of the Midway drawing much curiosity from passerby, who wonder what goods await them as they pass through the front door. The smell of fresh baked bread permeates the air, while baskets of soaps, and displays of jewelry, foods, lamps, pottery and other goods give visitors a true feeling of an old western general store.

The Wyoming Mercantile made its first appearance on the Midway at the Wyoming State Fair earlier this week. Since the doors first opened, there has been a steady stream of customers curious about what the store holds, said Kim Porter, who is the farmers market and education program manager with the Wyoming Business Council.

“We have had the Wyoming Products display at Fort Fedderman at the Wyoming State Fair for the last 10 years,” Porter explained. “Fort Fedderman is up on the hill by the office and away from the main part of the State Fair. For years, we have been trying to find a way to be on the Midway where the shoppers are.”

A few years ago, the Wyoming Business Council set aside funding to build the store and place it on the Midway. “We decided to find a design for an old west store, so we looked at different designs on the Internet,” she explained. “Once we found one we liked, we had an architect draw up the plans, and we had this building built.”

Inside the building, over 60 artisans have brought a wide variety of Wyoming-made products at a variety of price ranges. “The store has been quite a draw since the fair began earlier in the week,” Porter continued. “We have had probably 10 times the foot traffic we had in the old location. Having our own building has made it easier to stage things, and showcase some of our artists’ products.”

When a visitor steps through the door, some of the more unique products are wooden wine bottle corks, pottery made with horse hair, unique jewelry and a variety of tasty Wyoming foods. “What is unique about the store is all of the products are made in Wyoming by artisans,” she said. “This store is an opportunity for them to show off their talents.”

Next year, Porter said they have plans to utilize the outside of the building, too. “We are planning to display some of the artisans’ outside art products, in addition to holding demonstrations,” she said. Demonstrations from wool spinning, felting and saddlemaking to butter churning and making homemade ice cream are possibilities for next year’s state fair. “I have already started working with some of the vendors to bring in some demonstrations,” she added. “The vendors are very pleased with how the items are displayed in the store, and are eager to help make next year’s store even better.”

For more information on the Wyoming-made products that can be found in the Wyoming Mercantile, visit wyomingfirst.org. Porter can reached at 307-777-6319.

The building looks like something straight out of an old Clint Eastwood movie. The dark brown wooden building resembling an old west general store stands in the middle of the Midway drawing much curiosity from passerby, who wonder what goods await them as they pass through the front door. The smell of fresh baked bread permeates the air, while baskets of soaps, and displays of jewelry, foods, lamps, pottery and other goods give visitors a true feeling of an old western general store.

The Wyoming Mercantile made its first appearance on the Midway at the Wyoming State Fair earlier this week. Since the doors first opened, there has been a steady stream of customers curious about what the store holds, said Kim Porter, who is the farmers market and education program manager with the Wyoming Business Council.

“We have had the Wyoming Products display at Fort Fedderman at the Wyoming State Fair for the last 10 years,” Porter explained. “Fort Fedderman is up on the hill by the office and away from the main part of the State Fair. For years, we have been trying to find a way to be on the Midway where the shoppers are.”

A few years ago, the Wyoming Business Council set aside funding to build the store and place it on the Midway. “We decided to find a design for an old west store, so we looked at different designs on the Internet,” she explained. “Once we found one we liked, we had an architect draw up the plans, and we had this building built.”

Inside the building, over 60 artisans have brought a wide variety of Wyoming-made products at a variety of price ranges. “The store has been quite a draw since the fair began earlier in the week,” Porter continued. “We have had probably 10 times the foot traffic we had in the old location. Having our own building has made it easier to stage things, and showcase some of our artists’ products.”

When a visitor steps through the door, some of the more unique products are wooden wine bottle corks, pottery made with horse hair, unique jewelry and a variety of tasty Wyoming foods. “What is unique about the store is all of the products are made in Wyoming by artisans,” she said. “This store is an opportunity for them to show off their talents.”

Next year, Porter said they have plans to utilize the outside of the building, too. “We are planning to display some of the artisans’ outside art products, in addition to holding demonstrations,” she said. Demonstrations from wool spinning, felting and saddlemaking to butter churning and making homemade ice cream are possibilities for next year’s state fair. “I have already started working with some of the vendors to bring in some demonstrations,” she added. “The vendors are very pleased with how the items are displayed in the store, and are eager to help make next year’s store even better.”

For more information on the Wyoming-made products that can be found in the Wyoming Mercantile, visit wyomingfirst.org. Porter can reached at 307-777-6319.

The building looks like something straight out of an old Clint Eastwood movie. The dark brown wooden building resembling an old west general store stands in the middle of the Midway drawing much curiosity from passerby, who wonder what goods await them as they pass through the front door. The smell of fresh baked bread permeates the air, while baskets of soaps, and displays of jewelry, foods, lamps, pottery and other goods give visitors a true feeling of an old western general store.

The Wyoming Mercantile made its first appearance on the Midway at the Wyoming State Fair earlier this week. Since the doors first opened, there has been a steady stream of customers curious about what the store holds, said Kim Porter, who is the farmers market and education program manager with the Wyoming Business Council.

“We have had the Wyoming Products display at Fort Fedderman at the Wyoming State Fair for the last 10 years,” Porter explained. “Fort Fedderman is up on the hill by the office and away from the main part of the State Fair. For years, we have been trying to find a way to be on the Midway where the shoppers are.”

A few years ago, the Wyoming Business Council set aside funding to build the store and place it on the Midway. “We decided to find a design for an old west store, so we looked at different designs on the Internet,” she explained. “Once we found one we liked, we had an architect draw up the plans, and we had this building built.”

Inside the building, over 60 artisans have brought a wide variety of Wyoming-made products at a variety of price ranges. “The store has been quite a draw since the fair began earlier in the week,” Porter continued. “We have had probably 10 times the foot traffic we had in the old location. Having our own building has made it easier to stage things, and showcase some of our artists’ products.”

When a visitor steps through the door, some of the more unique products are wooden wine bottle corks, pottery made with horse hair, unique jewelry and a variety of tasty Wyoming foods. “What is unique about the store is all of the products are made in Wyoming by artisans,” she said. “This store is an opportunity for them to show off their talents.”

Next year, Porter said they have plans to utilize the outside of the building, too. “We are planning to display some of the artisans’ outside art products, in addition to holding demonstrations,” she said. Demonstrations from wool spinning, felting and saddlemaking to butter churning and making homemade ice cream are possibilities for next year’s state fair. “I have already started working with some of the vendors to bring in some demonstrations,” she added. “The vendors are very pleased with how the items are displayed in the store, and are eager to help make next year’s store even better.”

For more information on the Wyoming-made products that can be found in the Wyoming Mercantile, visit wyomingfirst.org. Porter can reached at 307-777-6319.


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