Young cattle producer tackles the beef business | TSLN.com

Young cattle producer tackles the beef business

Amanda Nolz

Staci Anderson showing at the 2009 South Dakota State Fair

It’s not everyday that a young female decides to take on cattle production and build up her own cowherd. More often than not, farm kids are abandoning their roots and heading for big city jobs away from rural communities and farm life, but not Staci Anderson. Anderson, of Parkston, SD, has quickly become a recognizable face in the beef industry, both in the show ring and at cattle business events. It’s a natural fit for this 21-year old farm girl. After all, she grew up around livestock her entire life. Her grandpa, Harold Anderson, raised registered Herefords and held production sales for 26 years. Her dad, Dusty, is also very involved in the industry, as a cattle producer and an agriculture loan officer with First Dakota Bank. So, when it was time for Anderson to choose her path in life, it was an easy decision to follow in their footsteps and take on the challenges of beef cattle production.

When she was a freshman in high school, Anderson applied for a Beginner Farmer and Rancher Loan through the Farm Service Agency (FSA) to assist her in buying her first females. FSA provides direct and guaranteed loans to beginning farmers and ranchers who are unable to obtain financing from commercial credit sources. FSA has available resources for beginning ranchers, women and minorities but is often overlooked by producers looking for financial assistance. The day after her 18th birthday, she went and got a direct loan to expand her herd. However, Anderson took advantage of the low interest rates to start building up her cowherd, and she has quickly developed a strong group of females that she is proud of.

It’s not everyday that a young female decides to take on cattle production and build up her own cowherd. More often than not, farm kids are abandoning their roots and heading for big city jobs away from rural communities and farm life, but not Staci Anderson. Anderson, of Parkston, SD, has quickly become a recognizable face in the beef industry, both in the show ring and at cattle business events. It’s a natural fit for this 21-year old farm girl. After all, she grew up around livestock her entire life. Her grandpa, Harold Anderson, raised registered Herefords and held production sales for 26 years. Her dad, Dusty, is also very involved in the industry, as a cattle producer and an agriculture loan officer with First Dakota Bank. So, when it was time for Anderson to choose her path in life, it was an easy decision to follow in their footsteps and take on the challenges of beef cattle production.

When she was a freshman in high school, Anderson applied for a Beginner Farmer and Rancher Loan through the Farm Service Agency (FSA) to assist her in buying her first females. FSA provides direct and guaranteed loans to beginning farmers and ranchers who are unable to obtain financing from commercial credit sources. FSA has available resources for beginning ranchers, women and minorities but is often overlooked by producers looking for financial assistance. The day after her 18th birthday, she went and got a direct loan to expand her herd. However, Anderson took advantage of the low interest rates to start building up her cowherd, and she has quickly developed a strong group of females that she is proud of.

It’s not everyday that a young female decides to take on cattle production and build up her own cowherd. More often than not, farm kids are abandoning their roots and heading for big city jobs away from rural communities and farm life, but not Staci Anderson. Anderson, of Parkston, SD, has quickly become a recognizable face in the beef industry, both in the show ring and at cattle business events. It’s a natural fit for this 21-year old farm girl. After all, she grew up around livestock her entire life. Her grandpa, Harold Anderson, raised registered Herefords and held production sales for 26 years. Her dad, Dusty, is also very involved in the industry, as a cattle producer and an agriculture loan officer with First Dakota Bank. So, when it was time for Anderson to choose her path in life, it was an easy decision to follow in their footsteps and take on the challenges of beef cattle production.

When she was a freshman in high school, Anderson applied for a Beginner Farmer and Rancher Loan through the Farm Service Agency (FSA) to assist her in buying her first females. FSA provides direct and guaranteed loans to beginning farmers and ranchers who are unable to obtain financing from commercial credit sources. FSA has available resources for beginning ranchers, women and minorities but is often overlooked by producers looking for financial assistance. The day after her 18th birthday, she went and got a direct loan to expand her herd. However, Anderson took advantage of the low interest rates to start building up her cowherd, and she has quickly developed a strong group of females that she is proud of.