Young & Landless: Beware of too-good-to-be-true markets | TSLN.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Young & Landless: Beware of too-good-to-be-true markets

Elizabeth Williams

INDIANOLA, IA – The last time production agriculture attracted so many young farmers back to the business was in the 1970s. Exports expanded, grain prices shot higher, technology improved, land values exploded and interest rates were low. Sound familiar?

While the Federal Reserve believes farm operators younger than 35 are the most vulnerable to another shock to prices, interest rates and land values, some youngsters are taking steps to avoid becoming casualties in the next boom-bust cycle.

INDIANOLA, IA – The last time production agriculture attracted so many young farmers back to the business was in the 1970s. Exports expanded, grain prices shot higher, technology improved, land values exploded and interest rates were low. Sound familiar?

While the Federal Reserve believes farm operators younger than 35 are the most vulnerable to another shock to prices, interest rates and land values, some youngsters are taking steps to avoid becoming casualties in the next boom-bust cycle.

INDIANOLA, IA – The last time production agriculture attracted so many young farmers back to the business was in the 1970s. Exports expanded, grain prices shot higher, technology improved, land values exploded and interest rates were low. Sound familiar?

While the Federal Reserve believes farm operators younger than 35 are the most vulnerable to another shock to prices, interest rates and land values, some youngsters are taking steps to avoid becoming casualties in the next boom-bust cycle.

INDIANOLA, IA – The last time production agriculture attracted so many young farmers back to the business was in the 1970s. Exports expanded, grain prices shot higher, technology improved, land values exploded and interest rates were low. Sound familiar?

While the Federal Reserve believes farm operators younger than 35 are the most vulnerable to another shock to prices, interest rates and land values, some youngsters are taking steps to avoid becoming casualties in the next boom-bust cycle.

INDIANOLA, IA – The last time production agriculture attracted so many young farmers back to the business was in the 1970s. Exports expanded, grain prices shot higher, technology improved, land values exploded and interest rates were low. Sound familiar?

While the Federal Reserve believes farm operators younger than 35 are the most vulnerable to another shock to prices, interest rates and land values, some youngsters are taking steps to avoid becoming casualties in the next boom-bust cycle.

INDIANOLA, IA – The last time production agriculture attracted so many young farmers back to the business was in the 1970s. Exports expanded, grain prices shot higher, technology improved, land values exploded and interest rates were low. Sound familiar?

While the Federal Reserve believes farm operators younger than 35 are the most vulnerable to another shock to prices, interest rates and land values, some youngsters are taking steps to avoid becoming casualties in the next boom-bust cycle.

INDIANOLA, IA – The last time production agriculture attracted so many young farmers back to the business was in the 1970s. Exports expanded, grain prices shot higher, technology improved, land values exploded and interest rates were low. Sound familiar?

While the Federal Reserve believes farm operators younger than 35 are the most vulnerable to another shock to prices, interest rates and land values, some youngsters are taking steps to avoid becoming casualties in the next boom-bust cycle.

editor’s note: this is part two of a two-part series entitled “young and the landless.” for a summary of beginning farmer finance programs, go to http://www.cfra.org/resources/beginning_farmer/fundingsources.


Start a dialogue, stay on topic and be civil.
If you don't follow the rules, your comment may be deleted.

User Legend: iconModerator iconTrusted User